Date   

This week's destination: 7/22

Naomi Lloyd
 

Hey Thursday birders! Are you dried out yet? Thursday is supposed to be perfect and they're not forecasting more Biblical floods for Wednesday, so let's give last week's destination another try.

Btw if you're doing any birding in RensCo, particularly downslope of the Plateau, be careful where you pull off the road. What looks like a washed-out shoulder may be in fact undercut pavement. Still closures and a lot of repairs in my area.

------------------

Hey Thursday birders! It's supposed to be the nicest day of the week (what luck!) but after this week+ of monsoons I'd rather stay off muddy slippery trails. Let's explore part of the new Albany-Hudson Electric Trail, starting in the Village of Nassau. Meet at the Village Commons off John Street at 8:00am and we'll walk south from there on a paved path. Plenty of parking in a gravel lot.

https://www.google.com/maps/dir//42.5144858,-73.6122449/@42.5148318,-73.6128323,18z/data=!4m2!4m1!3e0?hl=en&authuser=0

Checklist from this (last) weekend:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S91629864
(Past results are no guarantee of future performance.)

Info on the whole 36-mile trail:
https://hudsongreenway.ny.gov/albany-hudson-electric-trail



Naomi





Re: UPDATE NO DESTINATION This week's destination: 7/15

Naomi Lloyd
 

Repeat for the morning crowd:


On Wed, Jul 14, 2021 at 10:37 PM, naomi lloyd
<naomi_kestrel@...> wrote:
CANCELLED DUE TO ROADS WASHED OUT ETC

There are lots of roads damaged by the rain, creeks are still rising. I think it best to stay off the roads and let emergency crews do their job. Sorry!

Naomi


On Wednesday, July 14, 2021, 06:49:27 PM EDT, naomi lloyd <naomi_kestrel@...> wrote:


Heads up folks! All of RensCo is under a State of Emergency. We've had 3" to 6"of rain in a few hours, roads are flooded, trees are down, culverts washed out. I have no idea what the road conditions will be like by tomorrow morning.

If I know anything by about 6am, I'll let you all know. Otherwise check 511NY for info. On the positive side, the rain is supposed to be ending soon and with luck my sump pump will stem the tide...

See you tomorrow, maybe.


Naomi











UPDATE NO DESTINATION This week's destination: 7/15

Naomi Lloyd
 

CANCELLED DUE TO ROADS WASHED OUT ETC

There are lots of roads damaged by the rain, creeks are still rising. I think it best to stay off the roads and let emergency crews do their job. Sorry!

Naomi


On Wednesday, July 14, 2021, 06:49:27 PM EDT, naomi lloyd <naomi_kestrel@...> wrote:


Heads up folks! All of RensCo is under a State of Emergency. We've had 3" to 6"of rain in a few hours, roads are flooded, trees are down, culverts washed out. I have no idea what the road conditions will be like by tomorrow morning.

If I know anything by about 6am, I'll let you all know. Otherwise check 511NY for info. On the positive side, the rain is supposed to be ending soon and with luck my sump pump will stem the tide...

See you tomorrow, maybe.


Naomi











Re: This week's destination: 7/15

Naomi Lloyd
 

Heads up folks! All of RensCo is under a State of Emergency. We've had 3" to 6"of rain in a few hours, roads are flooded, trees are down, culverts washed out. I have no idea what the road conditions will be like by tomorrow morning.

If I know anything by about 6am, I'll let you all know. Otherwise check 511NY for info. On the positive side, the rain is supposed to be ending soon and with luck my sump pump will stem the tide...

See you tomorrow, maybe.

Naomi











This week's destination: 7/15

Naomi Lloyd
 

Hey Thursday birders! It's supposed to be the nicest day of the week (what luck!) but after this week+ of monsoons I'd rather stay off muddy slippery trails. Let's explore part of the new Albany-Hudson Electric Trail, starting in the Village of Nassau. Meet at the Village Commons off John Street at 8:00am and we'll walk south from there on a paved path. Plenty of parking in a gravel lot.

https://www.google.com/maps/dir//42.5144858,-73.6122449/@42.5148318,-73.6128323,18z/data=!4m2!4m1!3e0?hl=en&authuser=0

Checklist from this weekend:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S91629864
(Past results are no guarantee of future performance.)

Info on the whole 36-mile trail:
https://hudsongreenway.ny.gov/albany-hudson-electric-trail


Naomi





Re: Granville CE Block

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

One way to deal with situations like this is to download mapping apps like Avenza or Google Earth onto your smartphone and then download the free atlas block map layers from the atlas website.  This lets you see block boundaries without a data connection, but in my experience they aren’t particularly reliable and will periodically forget that you’ve installed the layer.

On Sat, Jul 10, 2021 at 8:00 PM Susan <smbeaudoin1@...> wrote:

If you attempt to bird the Granville CE Priority Block, be sure to bring a road map with you and bring a copy of the block map. There is no internet/cell service out there, so no Google maps, no Atlas map, no phone  calls or messaging . Fortunately I was able to find the Mettawee Cemetery off of Rt 24. It’s a delightful place surrounded by mixed deciduous and evergreen woods. There were some mown paths behind the plots in the “J” section, a cornfield at the entrance and a small pond. Despite not arriving until 1:30, I had a nice assortment of birds. The first two I saw were phoebes going in and out of a nest. Great to start off with a confirmation. 

We went up and down Rt 24, but never did see the Granville Airport shown on the map. I had written down the names of some other roads I wanted to try, but without GPS, gave up on finding them. It was also frustrating 

not knowing which block I was in. 

It’s a beautiful area and I’d recommend a trip out there as long as you come prepared with your own maps. would be fun to bird as long as you knew ahead of time in wn Rt 24, but never did see the Granville Airport shown on the map. I had written down the names of some other roads I wanted to try, but without GPS, gave up on finding them. It was also frustrating 

not knowing which block I was in. 

It’s a beautiful area and I’d recommend a trip out there as long as you come prepared with your own maps. would be fun to bird as long as you knew ahead of time


Susan Beaudoin

--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Granville CE Block

Susan
 

If you attempt to bird the Granville CE Priority Block, be sure to bring a road map with you and bring a copy of the block map. There is no internet/cell service out there, so no Google maps, no Atlas map, no phone  calls or messaging . Fortunately I was able to find the Mettawee Cemetery off of Rt 24. It’s a delightful place surrounded by mixed deciduous and evergreen woods. There were some mown paths behind the plots in the “J” section, a cornfield at the entrance and a small pond. Despite not arriving until 1:30, I had a nice assortment of birds. The first two I saw were phoebes going in and out of a nest. Great to start off with a confirmation. 

We went up and down Rt 24, but never did see the Granville Airport shown on the map. I had written down the names of some other roads I wanted to try, but without GPS, gave up on finding them. It was also frustrating 

not knowing which block I was in. 

It’s a beautiful area and I’d recommend a trip out there as long as you come prepared with your own maps. would be fun to bird as long as you knew ahead of time in wn Rt 24, but never did see the Granville Airport shown on the map. I had written down the names of some other roads I wanted to try, but without GPS, gave up on finding them. It was also frustrating 

not knowing which block I was in. 

It’s a beautiful area and I’d recommend a trip out there as long as you come prepared with your own maps. would be fun to bird as long as you knew ahead of time


Susan Beaudoin


Re: Even MORE capital region priority blocks that need Atlasing

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

Thanks for that information, Scott.  Maybe it will be possible to negotiate access to these areas next spring.  But Inman Pond is on public land, as is the Pilot Knob Gazebo.


On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 2:50 PM Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...> wrote:
Just for the record, Crossett Pond and the Three Ponds are entirely private access only.  I will speak with the Camp Ranger at Camp Wakpominee about any possible admittance to the Three Ponds...highly unlikely, as their youth camp season is in full swing and doesnt finish until the end of August. 

Scott Varney
Salem, NY

On Fri, Jul 9, 2021, 11:54 AM zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:
Due to popular demand, here are some other atlas blocks no one has visited yet.  These three blocks are in Washington County, and they aren't the only unvisited blocks in Washington County, but all three have some public lands that makes them easier to atlas than some of the other unbirded blocks in the region.

Granville CE - No visits.  Multiple cemeteries, an airport, and several ponds should make for a good diversity of habitats and species.  

West Pawlet CE - This block hosts the Pember Nature Preserve and a lot of riparian habitat along Black Creek, as well as farmland.  It hasn't been atlassed at all.  

Putnam Mountain NW - This block, near the eastern shore of Lake George, hosts Inman Pond and the trail to it from Sly Pond Road.  The Inman Pond trail also continues to the far end of the block and crosses into the adjoining non-priority block, and could be useful for covering a fairly large section of the block.  The south end of Crossett Pond is in-block, as are the Three Ponds (though I'm not sure how these are accessed.)  So is the Pilot Knob Gazebo (but not Pilot Knob itself.)

As noted above, there are many more unvisited blocks in Warren, Washington, and Fulton Counties, as well as in Greene and Schoharie counties, and even more blocks that only have a few hours logged and few if any species confirmed.  I will continue to highlight some of these blocks as fledgling season continues.  I'm happy to report that the merlin nest i have been monitoring all spring in Albany has three nestlings who have spent the last few days working their way down the branches of the tree where the nest is, and it looks like they'll fledge any day now if they haven't already done so today.
--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774



--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Re: Even MORE capital region priority blocks that need Atlasing

Scott Varney
 

Just for the record, Crossett Pond and the Three Ponds are entirely private access only.  I will speak with the Camp Ranger at Camp Wakpominee about any possible admittance to the Three Ponds...highly unlikely, as their youth camp season is in full swing and doesnt finish until the end of August. 

Scott Varney
Salem, NY

On Fri, Jul 9, 2021, 11:54 AM zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:
Due to popular demand, here are some other atlas blocks no one has visited yet.  These three blocks are in Washington County, and they aren't the only unvisited blocks in Washington County, but all three have some public lands that makes them easier to atlas than some of the other unbirded blocks in the region.

Granville CE - No visits.  Multiple cemeteries, an airport, and several ponds should make for a good diversity of habitats and species.  

West Pawlet CE - This block hosts the Pember Nature Preserve and a lot of riparian habitat along Black Creek, as well as farmland.  It hasn't been atlassed at all.  

Putnam Mountain NW - This block, near the eastern shore of Lake George, hosts Inman Pond and the trail to it from Sly Pond Road.  The Inman Pond trail also continues to the far end of the block and crosses into the adjoining non-priority block, and could be useful for covering a fairly large section of the block.  The south end of Crossett Pond is in-block, as are the Three Ponds (though I'm not sure how these are accessed.)  So is the Pilot Knob Gazebo (but not Pilot Knob itself.)

As noted above, there are many more unvisited blocks in Warren, Washington, and Fulton Counties, as well as in Greene and Schoharie counties, and even more blocks that only have a few hours logged and few if any species confirmed.  I will continue to highlight some of these blocks as fledgling season continues.  I'm happy to report that the merlin nest i have been monitoring all spring in Albany has three nestlings who have spent the last few days working their way down the branches of the tree where the nest is, and it looks like they'll fledge any day now if they haven't already done so today.
--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Even MORE capital region priority blocks that need Atlasing

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

Due to popular demand, here are some other atlas blocks no one has visited yet.  These three blocks are in Washington County, and they aren't the only unvisited blocks in Washington County, but all three have some public lands that makes them easier to atlas than some of the other unbirded blocks in the region.

Granville CE - No visits.  Multiple cemeteries, an airport, and several ponds should make for a good diversity of habitats and species.  

West Pawlet CE - This block hosts the Pember Nature Preserve and a lot of riparian habitat along Black Creek, as well as farmland.  It hasn't been atlassed at all.  

Putnam Mountain NW - This block, near the eastern shore of Lake George, hosts Inman Pond and the trail to it from Sly Pond Road.  The Inman Pond trail also continues to the far end of the block and crosses into the adjoining non-priority block, and could be useful for covering a fairly large section of the block.  The south end of Crossett Pond is in-block, as are the Three Ponds (though I'm not sure how these are accessed.)  So is the Pilot Knob Gazebo (but not Pilot Knob itself.)

As noted above, there are many more unvisited blocks in Warren, Washington, and Fulton Counties, as well as in Greene and Schoharie counties, and even more blocks that only have a few hours logged and few if any species confirmed.  I will continue to highlight some of these blocks as fledgling season continues.  I'm happy to report that the merlin nest i have been monitoring all spring in Albany has three nestlings who have spent the last few days working their way down the branches of the tree where the nest is, and it looks like they'll fledge any day now if they haven't already done so today.
--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


More priority blocks that need some atlassing!

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

Hello and Happy July to everyone.

As promised, here's another round of priority blocks that need more attention in our region.  If you get a chance in the next few weeks, head out and check some of these areas for breeding behavior!  Here are three blocks no one has visited yet!

Harrisburg CE - This block has zero checklists during the atlas period.  It's in the adirondack park and includes what seem to be public trails to Saint John Lake and Little Pond, both of which are entirely within the block.  This should be prime habitat for a lot of adirondacky species.

Harrisburg NW - another untouched block in the heart of the adirondacks, almost all of which is on public lands.  This block is accessed from W Stony Creek Road, and could be combined with a trip to Harrisburg CE

Brant Lake NW - Another unvisited block, this one includes Beaver Pond and a sizeable chunk of Brant Lake.  Much of this block is private land, so it might be a good block to take if you're someone who is comfortable having conversations with property owners to get access to land.  

All of these blocks desperately need birders to visit them and start confirming species, and all of them offer great opportunities to find unusual breeders for the region.  
--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


No destination this week: 7/8

Naomi Lloyd
 

Okay, I called it wrong last week, the morning turning out pretty decent after all. But if I'm faked out again blame NOAA not me! Look at this forecast!

Better luck next week I hope

Naomi


Re: No destination this week, 6/30

Naomi Lloyd
 

That should be 7/1, of course.

Naomi


On Wednesday, June 30, 2021, 10:01:16 AM EDT, naomi lloyd <naomi_kestrel@...> wrote:


Hey Thursday birders! Looks like we're finally getting that much-needed steady rain tomorrow and for several days after, so let's enjoy the less-brainmeltingly-hot weather coming and try again next week. Check flooded fields etc for early shorebird migrants!


Naomi





No destination this week, 6/30

Naomi Lloyd
 

Hey Thursday birders! Looks like we're finally getting that much-needed steady rain tomorrow and for several days after, so let's enjoy the less-brainmeltingly-hot weather coming and try again next week. Check flooded fields etc for early shorebird migrants!

Naomi





Re: Distressed Blue Jay

Ellen
 

Perhaps it was a fledgling that had fallen from a nest and was unable to fly?

 

Regarding the news report, I’ve heard that the cause of the bird deaths may have been pesticide poisoning rather than disease.

 

Ellen

 

From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert S Pastel
Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2021 11:36 PM
To: HMBirds <hmbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [hmbirds] Distressed Blue Jay

 

Ideas any one? 

Robert S. Pastel

 


Begin forwarded message:

From: rhdana6@...
Date: June 24, 2021 at 10:17:04 PM EDT
To: rspastel@...
Subject: Distressed Blue Jay



Bob and Nettye,

 

I went running today in the Pine Bush, Blueberry Hill section.  I came upon a blue jay acting very strangely.  After running across an article in National Geographic this evening (see link below) about an unidentified disease killing many birds, including blue jays, I now realize the bird was in distress and probably dying.

 

I heard a very loud mournful cooing right next to me that stopped me in my tracks.  It was the jay, no more than ten feet from me in a bush.  He continued to coo (a noise I’ve never heard a jay make) and was bobbing up and down on his legs.  I talked to him to see if he was perhaps stuck and couldn’t fly away.  He tried to fly but only got 3 feet higher in the bush, stumbling into branches as he flew.  So I left him there and continued running.

 

Is there someone I should report this to? The article did not mention New York State as one of the places the disease has been identified.  There’s always the NYSDEC Wildlife Pathology Unit, formerly headed by Ward Stone.  But I wanted to check with you two first to see if you had any insight.

 

Thanks,

 

Dick

 

 

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/scientists-don-t-know-why-hundreds-birds-are-getting-sick-n1271936


Re: Distressed Blue Jay

K O
 

A few years ago I had a few birds at my feeders, pretty sure they had finch eye disease. I sent an email to wildlife@... and they answered right away. 

On Fri, Jun 25, 2021 at 7:31 AM, Alan Mapes
<alanmapes@...> wrote:
The DEC Wildlife Pathology Unit would be the one, plus perhaps the Pine Bush Discovery Center. The biologists there may have interest in this, also.

On Thu, Jun 24, 2021 at 11:36 PM Robert S Pastel <rspastel@...> wrote:
Ideas any one? 

Robert S. Pastel


Begin forwarded message:

From: rhdana6@...
Date: June 24, 2021 at 10:17:04 PM EDT
To: rspastel@...
Subject: Distressed Blue Jay



Bob and Nettye,

 

I went running today in the Pine Bush, Blueberry Hill section.  I came upon a blue jay acting very strangely.  After running across an article in National Geographic this evening (see link below) about an unidentified disease killing many birds, including blue jays, I now realize the bird was in distress and probably dying.

 

I heard a very loud mournful cooing right next to me that stopped me in my tracks.  It was the jay, no more than ten feet from me in a bush.  He continued to coo (a noise I’ve never heard a jay make) and was bobbing up and down on his legs.  I talked to him to see if he was perhaps stuck and couldn’t fly away.  He tried to fly but only got 3 feet higher in the bush, stumbling into branches as he flew.  So I left him there and continued running.

 

Is there someone I should report this to? The article did not mention New York State as one of the places the disease has been identified.  There’s always the NYSDEC Wildlife Pathology Unit, formerly headed by Ward Stone.  But I wanted to check with you two first to see if you had any insight.

 

Thanks,

 

Dick

 

 

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/scientists-don-t-know-why-hundreds-birds-are-getting-sick-n1271936


Re: Distressed Blue Jay

Alan Mapes
 

The DEC Wildlife Pathology Unit would be the one, plus perhaps the Pine Bush Discovery Center. The biologists there may have interest in this, also.

On Thu, Jun 24, 2021 at 11:36 PM Robert S Pastel <rspastel@...> wrote:
Ideas any one? 

Robert S. Pastel


Begin forwarded message:

From: rhdana6@...
Date: June 24, 2021 at 10:17:04 PM EDT
To: rspastel@...
Subject: Distressed Blue Jay



Bob and Nettye,

 

I went running today in the Pine Bush, Blueberry Hill section.  I came upon a blue jay acting very strangely.  After running across an article in National Geographic this evening (see link below) about an unidentified disease killing many birds, including blue jays, I now realize the bird was in distress and probably dying.

 

I heard a very loud mournful cooing right next to me that stopped me in my tracks.  It was the jay, no more than ten feet from me in a bush.  He continued to coo (a noise I’ve never heard a jay make) and was bobbing up and down on his legs.  I talked to him to see if he was perhaps stuck and couldn’t fly away.  He tried to fly but only got 3 feet higher in the bush, stumbling into branches as he flew.  So I left him there and continued running.

 

Is there someone I should report this to? The article did not mention New York State as one of the places the disease has been identified.  There’s always the NYSDEC Wildlife Pathology Unit, formerly headed by Ward Stone.  But I wanted to check with you two first to see if you had any insight.

 

Thanks,

 

Dick

 

 

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/scientists-don-t-know-why-hundreds-birds-are-getting-sick-n1271936


Distressed Blue Jay

Robert S Pastel
 

Ideas any one? 

Robert S. Pastel


Begin forwarded message:

From: rhdana6@...
Date: June 24, 2021 at 10:17:04 PM EDT
To: rspastel@...
Subject: Distressed Blue Jay



Bob and Nettye,

 

I went running today in the Pine Bush, Blueberry Hill section.  I came upon a blue jay acting very strangely.  After running across an article in National Geographic this evening (see link below) about an unidentified disease killing many birds, including blue jays, I now realize the bird was in distress and probably dying.

 

I heard a very loud mournful cooing right next to me that stopped me in my tracks.  It was the jay, no more than ten feet from me in a bush.  He continued to coo (a noise I’ve never heard a jay make) and was bobbing up and down on his legs.  I talked to him to see if he was perhaps stuck and couldn’t fly away.  He tried to fly but only got 3 feet higher in the bush, stumbling into branches as he flew.  So I left him there and continued running.

 

Is there someone I should report this to? The article did not mention New York State as one of the places the disease has been identified.  There’s always the NYSDEC Wildlife Pathology Unit, formerly headed by Ward Stone.  But I wanted to check with you two first to see if you had any insight.

 

Thanks,

 

Dick

 

 

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/scientists-don-t-know-why-hundreds-birds-are-getting-sick-n1271936


Big Atlas Weekend Kickoff Event Tonight at 7 pm!

Matthew Medler
 

Join atlasers in ME, MD/DC, NY and NC to kick off the Big Atlas Weekend with introductory notes from the four atlas coordinators and a guest speaker.

The Big Atlas Weekend is an exciting new event and a fun way for birders from across Maine, Maryland, New York, and North Carolina to document breeding birds and come together as a birding community. It’s a great time to confirm breeding and fill gaps in the Atlas data within each state. 

To attend this Zoom event at 7 pm on Wednesday, June 23, register here: 


This week's destination: 6/24

Naomi Lloyd
 

Hey Thursday birders! I fear the Upland Sandpipers may have deserted the horse farm in West Ames - no sightings in repeated checks the past two months. So instead let's do a Fort Edward Grasslands exploration, with a side stop in Schuylerville for the Prothonotary Warbler that as of yesterday was still singing away. In previous years we've had Sedge Wren, Clay-colored Sparrow, and Uppies in the area. No reports of any of those, either, but I'm not seeing a lot of eBirding going on around there. Maybe we'll be the lucky finders!

Meet at 8:00am at the south end of the Surrender March Trail ("The Hemlocks") and from there we can move on to Cary Rd, the Grassland trail, and maybe Dowmont Rd and the rocky flats back off Harris Road. You can decide if you're comfortable with carpooling or wish to drive alone, but parking is limited in some spots and I only have one pair of working walkie-talkies.

Hope to see you - good birding!

About .15 miles past the Garnsey Ln and all the empty trailers, on the right. Blue historical marker reads "The Hemlocks".
https://www.google.com/maps/dir//43.0751499,-73.5841882/@43.0766386,-73.5840397,1225a,35y,93.41h/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!4m1!3e0?hl=en&authuser=0



Naomi




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