Date   

eBird Report - Zim Smith Trail, Oak Street to Underpass Road starting at Ballston Spa US-NY (42.9973,-73.8396), Jul 3, 2020

Ronald Harrower
 




Begin forwarded message:

From: ebird-checklist@...
Date: July 5, 2020 at 6:38:05 PM EDT
To: rharrower@...
Subject: eBird Report - Zim Smith Trail, Oak Street to Underpass Road starting at Ballston Spa US-NY (42.9973,-73.8396), Jul 3, 2020

Zim Smith Trail, Oak Street to Underpass Road starting at Ballston Spa US-NY (42.9973,-73.8396), Saratoga, New York, US
Jul 3, 2020 7:05 PM - 7:50 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Checklist Comments:     I went to the end of Zepko Road and parked near where the Zip Smith Trail parallels the railroad tracks. I walked to the beginning of the ZST and back, noting birds, but keeping to original purpose of collecting wildflowers for my art projects. My focus changed completely when I heard the unmistakable hoot of a Great-horned Owl and an answering call. I joined in the "conversation" and we all hooted for 20 minutes. The wind was blowing a bit as showers got started and stopped and some thunder was heard a ways off. One of the owls took off from a tall Pine tree in the forest about 1000 feet away across a large field. It flew to a tree about halfway up on the side of the field, seemingly checking me out. I got a dim view of hime or her just as it flew back to the woods. I was finally able to see the white throat patch and aimed my camera towards it. I was pleasantly surprised that I got something recognizable as an owl. I recorded the calls as well.It is cool that this spot is about a mile from my house, so I plan to go back. Very cool.
27 species

Mourning Dove  2
Great Horned Owl  2     One higher voice, one lower, suggesting male and female in that order. I thought I heard other owls calling farther away, but couldn't verify that. I will come back to this spot to "talk" and listen again.
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  4
Fish Crow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
House Wren  2
Gray Catbird  2
Eastern Bluebird  1
Veery  2
Wood Thrush  4
American Robin  6
American Goldfinch  3
Chipping Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  1
Common Grackle  2
Common Yellowthroat  2
Scarlet Tanager  2
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S71174010

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


Mourning Warbler

Steve Mesick
 

Really sorry to everyone who asked me specifics about this bird. I’ve been without email for a few days. The fire Tower Road that I’m talking about is off of Route 43 in Rensselaer County. If you search for fire Tower Road in Dunham Hollow, New York you will get the correct road. The bird was a hike in from the end of the road. If anyone wants to go for it call or text me at 518-8590973 (call or text) or 603-323-7 300 (call only) and I will send you more specific directions. The bird was singing constantly at about 9 AM so as long as you get to the right general area YOU should hear him. By the way I did post a recording of it on the eBird list today. If you don’t get me on either line text the first number because I will eventually get that.

Steve Mesick


Mourning Warbler

Steve Mesick
 

Alison Van Keuren and I had a Mourning Warbler singing repeatedly Fire Tower Rd extension today. Very difficult to see but sang repeatedly at mid morning. Will post the recording on ebird when I figure out how.

Steve Mesick


change of address

Barb, Rod and Jill
 

Hello,

Please note our change of email address . Our old one will work for a little while, but please note this change in your contacts list. New address is:   bapalmer144@gmail.com

Thanks,

Barb and Rod


Up close and personal with a black vulture

jeffdeal
 

During a walk we spotted a black vulture land along US Route 4, approximately 1/2 mile south of Hudson Valley Community College.  It was dodging cars to pick a piece of roadkill out of the traffic lane, and we were able to get quite close.  



Night time hummers

Alison Van Keuren
 

Let me try this again
Alison - please do me a favor and post on my behalf on HMBIRD a response to Scott Varney's 6/8/20 post that his camera is not likely detecting nocturnal hummingbirds. They go into overnight torpor, thus are not airborne. His recorded subjects are most likely sphinx moths which are nocturnally active. Hummers don't fly at night.

Thanks,

Bob


Clay-colored Sparrow

Richard Guthrie
 

Thanks to Cathy and Greg’s directions, I was able to find the Clay-colored Sparrows -yes plural. I heard at least two from opposite directions at the same time. See Gregg ‘s earlier post. It would be best to approach Dingman Road by way of Salt Springville Road since the Town is working on Dingman and it is officially closed. The bird I saw best was singing from a White Pine sapling on the north side of the mowed field.

There’s no need to go off the road since the birds can be seen and heard well from the road.

The nice lady in the mobile home across the road is very friendly and fun to chat with. I promised her a nice cold ice tea next time I visit. Beat me to it if you get there sooner.

Rich Guthrie
NewBaltimore
The Greene County
NY


Nighttime hummers

Alison Van Keuren
 





Begin forwarded message:

From: anneboby <anneboby@...>
Date: June 17, 2020 at 6:02:10 PM EDT
To: "aev12159@..." <aev12159@...>
Subject: Nighttime Hummers
Reply-To: anneboby <anneboby@...>

Alison - please do me a favor and post on my behalf on HMBIRD a response to Scott Varney's 6/8/20 post that his camera is not likely detecting nocturnal hummingbirds.  They go into overnight torpor, thus are not airborne.  His recorded subjects are most likely sphinx moths which are nocturnally active.  Hummers don't fly at night.

Thanks,

Bob


Nighttime Hummers

Alison Van Keuren
 




Begin forwarded message:

From: anneboby <anneboby@...>
Date: June 17, 2020 at 6:02:10 PM EDT
To: "aev12159@..." <aev12159@...>
Subject: Nighttime Hummers
Reply-To: anneboby <anneboby@...>

Alison - please do me a favor and post on my behalf on HMBIRD a response to Scott Varney's 6/8/20 post that his camera is not likely detecting nocturnal hummingbirds.  They go into overnight torpor, thus are not airborne.  His recorded subjects are most likely sphinx moths which are nocturnally active.  Hummers don't fly at night.

Thanks,

Bob


Re: Night Bird Call Mystery

Alan
 

Thanks to everyone for the helpful replies.

It was most definitely a fledgling Great Horned Owl's "begging" call. After hearing it for a total of about five hours over two nights it was immediately recognized from recordings on the web. My wife concurred. I do hear adult Great Horned Owls up here on the hill occasionally.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnS9v0O69_o

Always nice to have a mystery solved, rather than lingering in unknown status.

Clear skies, Alan


Re: Night Bird Call Mystery

Steve M. Chorvas
 

Try listening to a recording of a fledgling Great Horned Owl.  Your description, the time interval, and repetitiveness sound right for a young GHOW.


Steve


Steve Chorvas
Saugerties, NY 


-----Original Message-----
From: Alan <adfrench@...>
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jun 17, 2020 9:09 am
Subject: [hmbirds] Night Bird Call Mystery

Good Morning,

My wife and I have been out with a telescope for the past two nights.
Both nights we've heard a bird calling (it moves around, so I'm pretty
sure it's a bird). I'm not sure I can describe it well enough for an ID,
but I could check  out suggestions by listening to them at the Cornell
web site. After several hours of it over two nights, I think I'd
recognize it.

It was a short call, sort of a gentle, slightly hoarse screech.
Something like a "Pfweet." It was given once, with tens of seconds
before the next. Occasionally it might be repeated after perhaps just 10
seconds. It was rather uniform with little inflection. It usually
sounded a little hoarse or raspy, but sometimes it seemed a bit
"cleaner." There were also were variations that were softer. But the
word "monotonous" also came to mind fairly early on. I don't recall
hearing this call before, but might not have paid a lot of attention if
it didn't go on for so long.

The only other bird we heard was a distant Barred Owl.

Thanks for your help!

Clear skies, Alan
Glenville
(Semi-rural western part, with lots of woods and fields)




Baby bird Season

Scott Varney
 

As I finished up my 12 hour grading session for school today (yahoo...last day today!), I finally have a moment to breathe and take in some backyard birding. The White-breasted Nuthatches fledged at least 7 chicks, the Tufted Titmice have produced at least 8 babies, and the Robin nest on a corner beam of my log home is still being incubated. My entire yard is resonating with squeaky babies.  A male and female Scarlet Tanager have been making regular flights across the mowed lawn between my front and back yard...there is a nest somewhere close by, but I haven't had time to search for it. The baby birds are so fun to watch due to their bumbling and stumbling activities. 

Happy Birding and last day of school,

Scott Varney
Salem NY


Common Gallinule - Vischer Ferry

jhershey2
 

I found a Common Gallinule this morning at Vischer Ferry Preserve in the "back pond", the one along the west side of the main path that leads from the Whipple Bridge to the river. It was visible from the main gravel path, calling occasionally.   I've attached 2 pics of the Gallinule, plus a hen Common Merganser I saw in the River at the Vischer Ferry Power Plant and a mother Wood Duck with young in tow along the towpath west of the Whipple Bridge. 

John H.   


Re: Night Bird Call Mystery

Alan Mapes
 

Possibly a young owl, calling for the parents to feed it. 

On Wed, Jun 17, 2020 at 9:09 AM Alan <adfrench@...> wrote:
Good Morning,

My wife and I have been out with a telescope for the past two nights.
Both nights we've heard a bird calling (it moves around, so I'm pretty
sure it's a bird). I'm not sure I can describe it well enough for an ID,
but I could check  out suggestions by listening to them at the Cornell
web site. After several hours of it over two nights, I think I'd
recognize it.

It was a short call, sort of a gentle, slightly hoarse screech.
Something like a "Pfweet." It was given once, with tens of seconds
before the next. Occasionally it might be repeated after perhaps just 10
seconds. It was rather uniform with little inflection. It usually
sounded a little hoarse or raspy, but sometimes it seemed a bit
"cleaner." There were also were variations that were softer. But the
word "monotonous" also came to mind fairly early on. I don't recall
hearing this call before, but might not have paid a lot of attention if
it didn't go on for so long.

The only other bird we heard was a distant Barred Owl.

Thanks for your help!

Clear skies, Alan
Glenville
(Semi-rural western part, with lots of woods and fields)




Re: Night Bird Call Mystery

Shelley Gum
 

I know most of you are better at recognizing bird calls/songs than I am, but
I have resident catbirds who talk to me in the garden all day.  Recently I
am fairly certain that they are also "talking" at night; they seem to be 
right out the window behind my chair where I read at night (they also
have a nest in the bushes out that window).  

Cheers, Shelley in Poughkeepsie


-----Original Message-----
From: Alan <adfrench@...>
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jun 17, 2020 9:09 am
Subject: [hmbirds] Night Bird Call Mystery

Good Morning,

My wife and I have been out with a telescope for the past two nights.
Both nights we've heard a bird calling (it moves around, so I'm pretty
sure it's a bird). I'm not sure I can describe it well enough for an ID,
but I could check  out suggestions by listening to them at the Cornell
web site. After several hours of it over two nights, I think I'd
recognize it.

It was a short call, sort of a gentle, slightly hoarse screech.
Something like a "Pfweet." It was given once, with tens of seconds
before the next. Occasionally it might be repeated after perhaps just 10
seconds. It was rather uniform with little inflection. It usually
sounded a little hoarse or raspy, but sometimes it seemed a bit
"cleaner." There were also were variations that were softer. But the
word "monotonous" also came to mind fairly early on. I don't recall
hearing this call before, but might not have paid a lot of attention if
it didn't go on for so long.

The only other bird we heard was a distant Barred Owl.

Thanks for your help!

Clear skies, Alan
Glenville
(Semi-rural western part, with lots of woods and fields)




Night Bird Call Mystery

Alan
 

Good Morning,

My wife and I have been out with a telescope for the past two nights. Both nights we've heard a bird calling (it moves around, so I'm pretty sure it's a bird). I'm not sure I can describe it well enough for an ID, but I could check  out suggestions by listening to them at the Cornell web site. After several hours of it over two nights, I think I'd recognize it.

It was a short call, sort of a gentle, slightly hoarse screech. Something like a "Pfweet." It was given once, with tens of seconds before the next. Occasionally it might be repeated after perhaps just 10 seconds. It was rather uniform with little inflection. It usually sounded a little hoarse or raspy, but sometimes it seemed a bit "cleaner." There were also were variations that were softer. But the word "monotonous" also came to mind fairly early on. I don't recall hearing this call before, but might not have paid a lot of attention if it didn't go on for so long.

The only other bird we heard was a distant Barred Owl.

Thanks for your help!

Clear skies, Alan
Glenville
(Semi-rural western part, with lots of woods and fields)


clay-colored sparrow - ft plain

gregg_recer
 

I had good success this morning locating and viewing the clay-colored sparrow that's been present for a couple of weeks along dingman rd in the town of Ft Plain, Mont. Co. The bird stayed mostly on the north side of the road and close to the intersection with Salt Springville Rd. (CR 75). Very vocal and perching up for good scope views. At one point I was watching the bird sing when it seemed like a second song was answering from a different location, but it was only for a few phrases, so I can't be sure it wasn't some kind of audio artifact.

Also of interest was a pair of N harriers with the female appearing to carry food to a potential nest site.

while in the area I checked out the Ames horse farm and was eventually able to hear a upland sandpiper flight call, but never could locate the bird. The meadows and hay fields are very tall out there now.

--
gregg recer
malta NY


Virginia Rail and Chick

jhershey2
 

I walked the length of the Bog Meadow Brook Trail in Saratoga Springs this morning mainly looking for butterflies and wildflowers.  I was surprised to spot a dark bird feeding on the mud that turned out to be a Virginia Rail.  It moved a little further away but kept foraging while for some of the time another smaller dark bird seemed to join it.  After I looked carefully at my pictures I realized the smaller bird was a black, downy Virginia Rail chick - first I have ever seen.  A little further down the trail I spotted another grown Virginia Rail in the open. The rest of the birds I noticed on the trail were the expected ones.  I attached a few rail pics mostly for i.d. purposes. 

John H. 


Mourning Warbler, Rensselaerville State Forest

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

I found a male Mourning Warbler singing on territory in appropriate breeding habitat in Rensselaerville State Forest this morning.  I stayed on the bird for close to an hour and did not see a female at any point, so my guess is that this bird is prospecting, but who knows.  Unlike the second year male that hung around Partridge Run for a while in 2015, this bird was in adult plumage.  Photo and audio on my EBird checklist.  

ZSW
--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Re: Bittern?

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

It is not uncommon to see bitterns in trees during migration, though it is too late for either bittern to be migrating at the moment.  It's hard to rule out Green Heron from this photo.  And Black-Crowned is also a possibility, though they are somewhat uncommon in the area.


On Mon, Jun 8, 2020 at 5:17 PM Dan Leonard <dannyboy67leonard@...> wrote:
Is it too early for an immature Black-Crowned Night Heron (would be more likely in a tree)?

On Mon, Jun 8, 2020 at 5:07 PM bookconservator via groups.io <bookconservator=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I heard a new bird sound in the yard, sort of a squonk. Then saw what looked to be a bittern in a tree. Held its head with beak up and neck extended and streaky brown, just like those I gave seen at Montezuma when I lived out there. Larger than a crow. A bit bigger than the green herons we have had in the yard by the pond. See image upper center.

Would you find a bittern in a tree and if not, any ideas on what it could be?

Thanks for the input.

Donia
Ballston Spa



--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774

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