Date   

Five Rivers New Year's count

John Kent
 

The annual New Year's Day species count was held at Five Rivers this morning. The highlight was a Veery, seen at the research ponds by Naomi L. and the group she was leading. The only previous January records of Veery in New York were of one that was in Manhattan for a couple of weeks in 2020. The only records in surrounding states/provinces in January were one in Toronto in 1993 and one in Greenwich, CT in 1980. Almost all Veeries are in South or Central America in January. Other sightings were unremarkable by comparison. Early in the morning we had Common Mergansers, Red-Winged Blackbirds, and a Winter Wren, but unfortunately none of those were found after the group gathered. We had two Cooper's Hawks and a Northern Harrier. There were plenty of Eastern Bluebirds. Sparrows were scarce, but some saw White-throated and Song Sparrows. The species count was at least 34, with a couple more (including Brown-headed Cowbird) seen by those birding on their own.

This afternoon at Stanton Pond in Coeymans Hollow I saw multiple American Wigeon, Northern Pintail, and Gadwall. On Rowe Road a little south of where it crosses Coeymans Creek, I found a Yellow-rumped Warbler with some bluebirds feeding on juniper berries.

John Kent
Selkirk


Day 1

Jeffrey Schoonmaker
 

Happy New Year everyone!

Saratoga Lake, fog and overcast notwithstanding, yielded Ring-necked Ducks, Mallards, Common Mergansers, Hooded Mergansers, Buffleheads, Common Goldeneye, a Lesser Scaup, and a Kingfisher, along with Mallards, Canada Geese, and Ring-billed Gulls.  With very light traffic, we were able to stop right on the road at times which helped.

Not a bad 2022 start for an amateur like me!

Jeff Schoonmaker 


White-winged Crossbill, Salem

Scott Varney
 

While out in the yard this morning at 7:45 am (dog dooty time), I found a single White-winged Crossbill in my backyard.  I grabbed my bins and phone from the house and was able to get good looks at a very reddish-pink body with bold white wing bars. (Adult male!)  2 minutes later, It took flight and started calling loudly and clearly, heading south along Route 22 toward the Cambridge direction.  A yard-bird first!  

I've been routinely checking the Salem Crabapple trees in hopes of finding Pine Grosbeaks, but none as of this post.

A group of 25-30 Pine Siskins have been hanging out on West Broadway/Route 30 near the intersection with Cemetary Road.

Happy Birding,

Scott Varney 
Salem,  NY 


Catbird

Robert S Pastel
 

One catbird among house sparrows in city of Albany.

Robert S. Pastel


This week's destination: 12/30

Naomi Lloyd
 

Hey Thursday birders! It's the last Thursday of a very strange year - here's hoping 2022 is closer to normal!

It seems freeze-up on the big lakes comes later every year. It's beginning on Saratoga Lake, so let's meet at Brown's Beach at 9:00am for our first circumnavigation of the season.

https://www.google.com/maps/dir//''/@42.9845298,-73.7327109,14z/data=!4m9!4m8!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x89de3c1f8226f623:0x625e3ce3f840736!2m2!1d-73.7429022!2d42.9858443!3e0?hl=en&authuser=0

And if I don't see you then, may you all have a happy and healthy year to come!

Naomi










eBird Report - Saratoga Lake, Dec 26, 2021: Long-tailed Duck, Redhead, White-winged Scoter

Ronald Harrower
 

Saratoga Lake, Saratoga, New York, US
Dec 26, 2021 1:14 PM - 1:59 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: I drove up the East side of Saratoga Lake after making a report at Brown's Beach. I stopped at St Isaac Jogues Chapel and was able to observe Long-tailed Duck at leisure. In that cove was the first sizable raft of Ring-necked Ducks, which continued to have larger rafts out a ways from the shore. Also at that cove, I saw the ongoing drake Northern Pintail which had been at Brown's Beach for many weeks. I stopped along the road where it was safe to stay for a couple of minutes. I was not afforded the time to set up the scope after that first stop and had to do what I call "drive by shooting" where I take dozens of photos of each raft of ducks and if I have the time, go over them again if they are actively diving so as not to miss any. I could see 200+ Scaups of both species, at least 220 Ring-necked Ducks, Scattered Hooded Mergansers, Common Mergansers, Mallards, a couple of Gadwalls, Black Ducks, Buffleheads and Common Goldeneyes. It wasn't until I looked through my photos later that I picked up the drake Redhead and a pair of White-winged Scoters. That is why I do the drive by shooting: I don't want to miss anything because I don't have the time to set up a scope and really observe at leisure. Saratoga Lake is not birder friendly along most of the ay around. And where it is, (like Brown's Beach, the chapel, Riley Cover and Silver Beach, it is by accident not by intention. Frustrating because the lake is such an important spot for waterfowl to rest and feed before heading on.
23 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose 575
Gadwall 2
Mallard 115
American Black Duck 9
Northern Pintail 1
Redhead 1
Ring-necked Duck 220 There were large rafts of them up from Snake Hill to Fitch Rd
Greater Scaup 50
Lesser Scaup 75
Greater/Lesser Scaup 120 They were fairly close to the shore. As I stated in the beginning notes I am 99% sure these ducks along with the Ring-necked Ducks came to Saratoga Lake from Loughberry Lake when it froze over last week. The numbers were even higher there.
White-winged Scoter 2
Long-tailed Duck 1
Bufflehead 33
Common Goldeneye 160
Hooded Merganser 43
Common Merganser 32
Ring-billed Gull 27
Herring Gull 1
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 7
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
European Starling 75
American Robin 2
Common Grackle 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S99562699

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


Re: Cackling Geese Population

Raymond Perry
 

This looked interesting so I perused the Kingbird archives for sightings of large groups of Cackling Goose in NYS. I wanted to know how  often 30 or more Cackling Geese have been observed in NY  I did not do an exhaustive search but I did find some interesting reports.
The highest count I found was 81 from Oak Orchard WMA on March 12, 2010 and 79 on March 14, 2010. There may have been overlap between the two sets of observations. Other observations included:
41 Hamlin Beach Nov. 2, 2014
39 Seneca Lake SP Nov. 2, 2017
37 Hartland (Niagara County) Mar. 11 and Mar. 20, 2011
37 Seneca Lake SP Mar. 5, 2018
35 Iroquois NWR Oct. 25, 2012
31 Town of Danby Feb 27, 2018
30 Hartland Mar. 24, 2013
Additionally there were 9 observations of 20-29 and 35 between 10-19. 
Central and Western NY accounted for all the observation I could find of 10 or more Cackling Geese. Observations  in the Hudson Mohawk region were 1-2 individuals 
The records I looked at were from 2010-2018. 
The Cackling Goose was not split out as a separate species until 2004. It was not often reported as a subspecies  until the 1990’s so early records may under represent them
The eBird report I saw was from Niagara on March 15,2010, 79 birds by Jim Pawlicki which would be the same record as the one referenced above (in spite of the one day difference in dates) 


On Dec 23, 2021, at 7:31 PM, zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:


Hi Scott,

In short, no, probably not.  We are a thousand miles east of the core winter range of Richardson’s Cackling Goose, the easternmost subspecies of cackling.  Any large gatherings are likely to be mostly or entirely one of the Canada populations.  There is one record of 79 cackling geese in eBird from the finger lakes eleven years ago, but we don’t get numbers anywhere near that in our region.  The best way to settle this would be photo documentation, of course.

On Thu, Dec 23, 2021 at 7:22 PM Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...> wrote:
I have a question.  Is it possible to have a population (about 30 birds) of Cackling Geese in our region?  

Each day (during the cold season) I drive along Route 29 from Salem to Schuylerville, following the bends of the Battenkill River.  In Greenwich, near Heppatica Way (a private lane), I have been seeing approximately 30 Geese that are all stubby-billed and slightly larger than a Mallard duck. 

They keep themselves upsream and isolated from the much larger Canada Geese that are found on the much wider portions of the river closer to the village.  I see them every day in the winter at 7:15 am and again at about 2:45 pm.   There is nowhere to park the car and traffic is a bit scary.  

Has anyone else noticed this flock?  

Tomorrow (day off work), I'm going to park at the Town beach and trek to the spot with my camera...and hopefully solve my 3-year long riddle...and yes, I know about the smaller subspecies of Canada Geese.

Share your thoughts?

Scott Varney
Salem, NY

--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Field Sparrow - Saratoga

Alan Mapes
 

For the first time this winter, a single field sparrow showed up at the feeders today. 

Alan Mapes


Waterfowl at Stanford's Bridge

Alan Mapes
 

Waterfowl are grouped up at Stanford’s on Fish Creek, Saratoga, as the ice begins to form. One northern shoveler, 2 green-winged teal and 4 northern pintail were among the usual suspects this morning.

Alan Mapes
Saratoga


Snowy Owl

Scott Varney
 

While travelling home today, on Rowe Hill Road in Hartford, NY (near the Dollar General and the intersection with Route 40), I observed a very black-peppered, Snowy Owl flying over the road and heading northeast.  The owl perched in a tree behind a house and I was able to pull over with my car and get great scope views.  

It was really nice to see this species outside the Washington County Grasslands area.  

Scott Varney
Salem, NY


Re: Cackling Geese Population

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

Hi Scott,

In short, no, probably not.  We are a thousand miles east of the core winter range of Richardson’s Cackling Goose, the easternmost subspecies of cackling.  Any large gatherings are likely to be mostly or entirely one of the Canada populations.  There is one record of 79 cackling geese in eBird from the finger lakes eleven years ago, but we don’t get numbers anywhere near that in our region.  The best way to settle this would be photo documentation, of course.

On Thu, Dec 23, 2021 at 7:22 PM Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...> wrote:
I have a question.  Is it possible to have a population (about 30 birds) of Cackling Geese in our region?  

Each day (during the cold season) I drive along Route 29 from Salem to Schuylerville, following the bends of the Battenkill River.  In Greenwich, near Heppatica Way (a private lane), I have been seeing approximately 30 Geese that are all stubby-billed and slightly larger than a Mallard duck. 

They keep themselves upsream and isolated from the much larger Canada Geese that are found on the much wider portions of the river closer to the village.  I see them every day in the winter at 7:15 am and again at about 2:45 pm.   There is nowhere to park the car and traffic is a bit scary.  

Has anyone else noticed this flock?  

Tomorrow (day off work), I'm going to park at the Town beach and trek to the spot with my camera...and hopefully solve my 3-year long riddle...and yes, I know about the smaller subspecies of Canada Geese.

Share your thoughts?

Scott Varney
Salem, NY

--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Cackling Geese Population

Scott Varney
 

I have a question.  Is it possible to have a population (about 30 birds) of Cackling Geese in our region?  

Each day (during the cold season) I drive along Route 29 from Salem to Schuylerville, following the bends of the Battenkill River.  In Greenwich, near Heppatica Way (a private lane), I have been seeing approximately 30 Geese that are all stubby-billed and slightly larger than a Mallard duck. 

They keep themselves upsream and isolated from the much larger Canada Geese that are found on the much wider portions of the river closer to the village.  I see them every day in the winter at 7:15 am and again at about 2:45 pm.   There is nowhere to park the car and traffic is a bit scary.  

Has anyone else noticed this flock?  

Tomorrow (day off work), I'm going to park at the Town beach and trek to the spot with my camera...and hopefully solve my 3-year long riddle...and yes, I know about the smaller subspecies of Canada Geese.

Share your thoughts?

Scott Varney
Salem, NY


Iceland Gull, Mohawk at crescent park

gregg_recer
 

a juv/1st cycle Iceland gull currently in view in the large group of gulls on the sand bar across from the crescent park parking. black bill, long wing extension, nearly white overall, but with faint dirty-gray edging on body and primary feathers. good light right now, but needs a scope 
--
gregg recer
malta NY


Fort Edward grasslands this afternoon

scottjstoner
 

Denise and I checked various areas, including Cary, Fitzpatrick, Plum, and Swamp roads. We had 11 Northern Harriers, 1 Rough-legged Hawk, 1 American Kestrel, several Red-tails, and 1 Short-eared Owl. The strong and bitter wind made birding and photography challenging, and may have reduced the Owl activity. Scott Stoner, Loudonville NY



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: No destination this week

Richard Guthrie
 

Thanks and same to you! 

On Wed, Dec 22, 2021 at 8:22 AM naomi lloyd <naomi_kestrel@...> wrote:
Hey Thursday birders! No destination this week, since I'm sure we're all busy.

Happy holidays - may you get all the birds you wish for and see you next week!

Naomi






--
Richard Guthrie


No destination this week

Naomi Lloyd
 

Hey Thursday birders! No destination this week, since I'm sure we're all busy.

Happy holidays - may you get all the birds you wish for and see you next week!

Naomi





Town of Austerlitz, NY Golden Eagle

kernscot
 

Not seen today, Dec.21, 2021

Nancy

Austerlitz, Columbia County, New York, US
Dec 20, 2021 9:00 AM - 1:10 PM
 
Checklist Comments:     Town of Austerlitz, NY. Sunny, 35F temp., breeze.
25 species

Ring-necked Pheasant (Ring-necked)  2     cocks near a feeder
Mourning Dove  2
Golden Eagle  1     Dark brown eagle with white band on the tail. legs feathered, golden sheen on head and neck. See eBird photos
Bald Eagle  4     feeding on a deer carcass in a field along with a Golden Eagle, raven.
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker (Eastern)  2
Hairy Woodpecker (Eastern)  1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  7
Common Raven  9
Black-capped Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)  2
Carolina Wren  1
Eastern Bluebird  2
American Robin  5
Cedar Waxwing  2
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  3
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  5
White-throated Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  1

View this checklist online at https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS99255227&amp;data=04%7C01%7C%7Ce3788a8521d24ad6c2c208d9c4f85583%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637757393156703294%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000&amp;sdata=V%2B0%2FFAHygO9%2FPqPq%2FaFiqLoNTRMseu5DlDBaeYzz54w%3D&amp;reserved=0


Initial results for the Schenectady CBC, Saturday, December 18

Larry & Penny Alden
 

Initial results are in from all field parties from Saturday’s Schenectady CBC.  This count has been held each year since December 1929. This year’s count was held in wet weather, with temperatures hovering around freezing and snow/sleet/rain falling from around 11:00 onward.

 

Nine field parties found a total of 61 species, with two additional species reported from within the count circle by non-participants.  Highlights include: 2 Wood Ducks, 4 Gadwalls, I Common Goldeneye, 3 Hooded Mergansers, 3 Double-crested Cormorants, 6 Eastern Screech-Owls, 1 Great Horned Owl, 3 Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, 1 American Kestrel, 9 Brown Creepers, 6 Winter Wrens, 4 Golden-crowned Kinglets, 1 Hermit Thrush, 1 Gray Catbird, 2 Swamp Sparrows, 10 Red-winged Blackbirds, and 2 Brown-headed Cowbirds.  The two additional species were White-crowned Sparrow and Yellow-rumped Warbler.

 

The 3 cormorants represent a record, with single individuals reported in just five counts prior to this one.  We also topped the previous highs with 95 Black Vultures and 560 Cedar Waxwings.

 

Larry Alden

Compiler


Re: Schenectady CBC

Larry & Penny Alden
 

That would be me.

 

Larry Alden

overlook@...

 

From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Earthday49 via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 20, 2021 10:30 PM
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Subject: [hmbirds] Schenectady CBC

 

Who is the coordinator for the Schenectady CBC ?

Alan Schroeder


Schenectady CBC

Alan Schroeder
 

Who is the coordinator for the Schenectady CBC ?

Alan Schroeder

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