Date   

DICK redux

Tristan Lowery
 

I found another DICKCISSEL in Albany County this morning, this time at what will become the new Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy Bender Melon Farm property. This property isn't yet open to the public, but will be soon; some Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club members have been allowed access ahead of the official opening to begin documenting species occurring there, which should help inform MHLC management plans for the farm.

Good birding!

Tristan Lowery
Albany


Barnacle Goose Schoharie county

Richard Guthrie
 

FYI, a Barnacle Goose was found today, Oct. 6, in with a bunch of Canada Geese at the Cobleskill Reservoir in Schoharie County.

Rich Guthrie
NewBaltimore
The Greene County


zim smith from halfmoon to mechanicville - lotsa sparrows

gregg_recer
 

I walked the newest segment of the zim smith this morning, running from halfmoon east to mechanicville. compared to the halfmoon to round lake segment, it's more uplands type habitat with mature forest mixed with plenty of weedy edges. the excellent sparrow habitat produced many big groups of song and white-throats, a small party of chipping, and a single savanna. all the warblers I saw were yellow-rumps except a single palm. also of interest was a pretty late yellow-bellied flycatcher. 
--
gregg recer
malta NY


Fall Color at Hudson Crossing

Scott Varney
 

In a single tree right next to the gravel parking lot, there are the following species at 10:23 am on 10/6.

Cardinals (2 males, 1 female)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Hairy Woodpecker (male)
Gray Catbird
Eastern Towhee
Blue Jay
Eastern Bluebird
Yellow-rumped Warbler

What an amazing blend of colors making up for the drab autumn foliage!


HMBC Field Trip reminders- Sat./Sun, Oct. 9-10

trwdsd
 

Saturday, October 9, FIVE RIVERS EEC (Albany County; morning)

Coordinator: John Kent jwkent@...

We’ll walk about 2 miles over generally flat terrain with some small hills, passing through a variety of habitats. Migrating sparrows are often abundant at this time of the year, with a good chance of Lincoln’s and White-crowned as well as more common species. Both species of kinglet may be present, as well as Yellow-rumped Warbler, Palm Warbler and Blue-headed Vireo. A late Nashville, Black-throated Green, Blackpoll or Magnolia Warbler might be found. Wood Duck and other waterfowl are possible, as well as Cooper’s and Sharp-shinned Hawks and Merlin. Wet grass and muddy spots may be encountered, so waterproof footwear is recommended.

Meet at 8:00 a.m. in the parking lot at Five Rivers EEC in Delmar.  Map and full information at this link:  https://hmbc.net/event-4382846


Sunday, October 10, BOG MEADOW BROOK NATURE TRAIL (Saratoga County; morning)

Coordinator: Ron Harrower ronharrower14@...

Bog Meadow Brook Trail, an old rail trail just east of Saratoga Springs, runs along the northern edge of a swamp and consists of wetland habitat with two ponds and a wet mixed forest in between. In October, sparrows are moving in and late migrants are still present. There should be a good variety of waterfowl and lingering shorebirds are possible.

 

Meet at 8:00 AM at the trailhead pull-off on Meadowbrook Road, about .3 miles west of Stafford Bridge Rd/Rt 67. If we have enough participants, we will stage some vehicles at the Lake Ave. end to save walking the round trip.  Map and full information at this link:  https://hmbc.net/event-4382863


This week's destination: 10/7

Naomi Lloyd
 

Hey Thursday birders! I've been told the bug situation at Vischer Ferry is greatly improved the past week, so let's try a walk through there. The towpath should be all right, but the woods trails will probably be muddy (over 2.5" on my side of the river...) so be prepared. Meet at the Whipple Bridge at 8:00am

https://www.google.com/maps/dir//''/@42.7912276,-73.7979325,16z/data=!4m9!4m8!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x89de1287ecd09d73:0x171382585076b2d3!2m2!1d-73.7958229!2d42.7926947!3e0?hl=en&authuser=0

Naomi





program reminder - HMBC Zoom program Monday Oct 4 6:30 PM - Piping Plovers

scottjstoner
 

  • HMBC Program Notice
  • Recovery of an Endangered Shorebird Population: the Piping Plover in the Great Lakes
  • Monday, October 4, 2021, 6:30PM via Zoom meeting
  •  
Hello HMBC Members:
    This is a reminder that the HMBC October program will be held via a Zoom meeting on Monday October 4th at 6:30 PM. Use the meeting link below to join the meeting as a participant. All participants will enter the "waiting room" until the meeting host opens the meeting. Participants' audio lines will be muted on entry. We ask that participants keep their lines muted except when prompted for Q&A during the program.
    NOTE: The first time you use Zoom on a device, you will be prompted to download the Zoom app when you click on the meeting link below. Follow the prompts to download the app and then launch the meeting using the meeting ID from the invite. (The app is recommended, but if you prefer, there is also an option when you open the link below to join the meeting via a web browser window, but with limited capabilities.) Audio connections can be through the app on your device or through a separate dial-in phone number given below.
    Program details:
    Title: Recovery of an Endangered Shorebird Population: the Piping Plover in the Great Lakes
    Speaker: Dr. Francie Cuthbert

    The Great Lakes Piping Plover population was listed as endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1986. Francie Cuthbert began her long-term (~35 years) research and conservation efforts to recover this population at the time of listing. This presentation will cover the history of plovers in the Great Lakes, threats that caused their decline to only 12-17 pairs and strategies that were used to increase numbers to 60-70 pairs currently. Join us to learn about the plover's recovery from this distinguished scientist, as well as how a large commercial airliner was named for her! 
    Dr. Francesca J. Cuthbert is a Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. She is also a Scientific Investigator at the University of Michigan Biological Station during the summer. For the past 30 years her research has focused on three topics in avian biology and conservation: recovery of federal or state listed species (especially piping plovers); ecology and population dynamics of colonial nesting waterbirds; and ecology and management of abundant species (especially double-crested cormorants). Most of her research involves working closely with federal and state agency biologists to facilitate conservation and management in the Great Lakes Region. She has advised > than 50 MS and PhD students and published >100 peer-reviewed research papers. Dr. Cuthbert is a past President of the Waterbird Society, Member of the Waterbird Conservation Council of the Americas and a Fellow in the American Ornithological Society. In 2009 she was honored as a Recovery Champion by US Fish and Wildlife Service for her career-long contributions to the conservation of the Great Lakes population of the Piping Plover.

    Meeting details:
    Topic: HMBC October Program Meeting
    Time: Oct 4, 2021 06:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
    Join Zoom Meeting
    Meeting ID: 876 6503 7216
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    --
    • Scott Stoner, Program Chair
    • Gregg Recer, Membership Chair


    Re: DICK

    Craig Driggs
     

    The Dickcissel is still present at the same location Sunday morning. I got brief looks at it on the red fence. The bird and the house sparrows are mostly staying hidden.

    Craig Driggs


    On Oct 2, 2021 2:24 PM, "trwdsd via groups.io" <trwdsd@...> wrote:
    Bird still present at same location (red cow pen) at 2:15pm.

    Tom Williams 
    Colonie


    Great Blue Heron eating snakes and voles at Five Rivers

    scottjstoner
     

    To further the discussion of a week ago with some personal documentation, a Great Blue Heron has been frequenting the visitor center area of Five Rivers EEC for at least 5 days. While its diet is generally mostly fish, they do feed upon snakes, small mammals, and other creatures. Clearly, this bird has been finding enough non-piscine food. Denise and I other visitors have observed and photographed it catch and consume several snakes and meadow voles. It sometimes stand on the green roof of the visitor center, and walks around various points on the grounds, from the bird feeding area to water collection basins to un-mowed grass areas between the building and Game Farm Rd. - Scott Stoner, Loudonville


    DSC_2483 great blue heron with meadow vole at 5R by park lot SJS cr-denoise-denoise.jpg


    DSC_2701 Great Blue Heron with snake at 5R SJS 4x6 near vis cntr CR-denoise-denoise resixed.jpg


    Saratoga Battlefield Trip

    Susan
     

    It was a sparrow and warbler day at SNHP this morning. Twelve of us enjoyed a pleasant day with several mixed flocks interspersed between dead quiet areas. Sparrows included White-throated, Song, Swamp, Field, and Chipping.The first two were by far the most numerous. Not surprisingly, out of the eight species of warblers we saw, yellow-rumped was by far the most plentiful. The others included Palm, Tennessee, Blackpoll, Bay-breasted, Nashville, Black-throated Green and Common Yellowthroat. Brown Creeper, Blue-headed Vireo, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Cooper's Hawk, Eastern Towhee, Phoebe, Cedar Waxwing and Eastern Bluebird were among the other species observed. Goldfinches were heard and seen almost everywhere. One was seen feeding its offspring. 
    Thanks to everyone for their spotting and id help.
    Susan Beaudoin


    Re: DICK

    trwdsd
     

    Bird still present at same location (red cow pen) at 2:15pm.

    Tom Williams 
    Colonie


    Re: DICK

    Tristan Lowery
     

    John Kent and I refound the bird about fifteen minutes after my initial observation, at the same location.


    On Sat, Oct 2, 2021, 10:25 Tristan Lowery via groups.io <tristanlowery=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
     I just photographed a DICKCISSEL at Normanskill Farm. It was hanging out at the cow pen near the old hay barn, just beyond the main parking lot. I'm not on it now but it was with a flock of about two dozen House Sparrows. There are usually House Sparrows in this spot, so there's a chance the Dickcissel will hang out.

    Good birding!

    Tristan Lowery
    Albany


    Re: Five Rivers Thursday and Friday-warblers, land-feeding great blue, and greater yellowlegs

    Robert S Pastel
     

    Saturday at 10 am on wild turkey trail I had a black billed cuckoo.  It’s birdy on the trail just north east of bus parking lot.  

    Robert S. Pastel


    On Oct 2, 2021, at 7:02 AM, scottjstoner via groups.io <ScottJStoner@...> wrote:

    
    At Five Rivers EEC in Delmar...Warblers include palm, Tennessee, and dozens of Yellow-rumped; towhees and catbirds are still present, and the land-foraging great blue heron comtinues in the general vicinity of the visitor center and parking lot. Yesterday afternoon I photographed it with a vole. Yesterday morning there was a flyover Greater Yellowlegs from the parking lot!  -Scott Stoner, Loudonville




    Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


    DICK

    Tristan Lowery
     

     I just photographed a DICKCISSEL at Normanskill Farm. It was hanging out at the cow pen near the old hay barn, just beyond the main parking lot. I'm not on it now but it was with a flock of about two dozen House Sparrows. There are usually House Sparrows in this spot, so there's a chance the Dickcissel will hang out.

    Good birding!

    Tristan Lowery
    Albany


    Five Rivers Thursday and Friday-warblers, land-feeding great blue, and greater yellowlegs

    scottjstoner
     

    At Five Rivers EEC in Delmar...Warblers include palm, Tennessee, and dozens of Yellow-rumped; towhees and catbirds are still present, and the land-foraging great blue heron comtinues in the general vicinity of the visitor center and parking lot. Yesterday afternoon I photographed it with a vole. Yesterday morning there was a flyover Greater Yellowlegs from the parking lot!  -Scott Stoner, Loudonville




    Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


    Vischer Ferry Warblers

    jhershey2
     

    The variety of fall warblers at Vischer Ferry is declining but the Yellow-rumps are making up for that in big numbers.  I estimate at least 100 Yellow-rumps along the western towpath this morning.  They were chasing each other, flitting from bushes to trees, and eating poison ivy berries.  I found just 2 other warbler species there.  They can be easily missed if you get bored with all of the Yellow-rumps and stop looking at each one.  I posted 3 warbler pics below. 


     



    They are in order: Palm, Yellow-rumped with poison ivy, and Blackpoll.  

    John H.


    FOTF

    Jeffrey Schoonmaker
     

    A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker visited my yard a short while ago this morning, a FOTF bird for me.  I'm still missing out on Blackpoll, Blackburnian, Swainson's, and Merlin, but I met my goal of reaching 300 birds in the Lower 48 States during this, my first full calendar year of retirement.  I'm at 312 so far with 314 being my record back in 2010 when Doris and I traveled more than normal.  Spending 2 weeks in SEAZ in mid-April was a huge boost this year!

    Jeff Schoonmaker


    Re: Hunting season Oct. 1

    Naomi Lloyd
     

    Thanks for the info, Rich.

    In addition, Vischer Ferry has a short duck season October 16 - 22, 2021

    Naomi


    On Thursday, September 30, 2021, 12:05:09 PM EDT, Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie@...> wrote:


    Heads-up


    Small game and beginning with Snow Goose, waterfowl hunting season starts tomorrow, Oct. 1st.

    Despite objections, duck hunting and deer hunting are permitted on the Coxsackie Grasslands. The persuading argument put up was that there's no evidence that birders are discouraged from entering the grounds even though the posting signs indicate that hunters may be present. 

    At the Coxsackie Grasslands, the duck season runs from Oct. 16 through Nov. 28th, and Dec. 4th through Dec. 10th. The second season elsewhere in the southeastern zone runs through Dec. 19th.

    So, be aware that at the Coxsackie Grasslands, duck hunting is permitted  up to 3 hours after sunrise and then from 3 hours before sunset. And, deer hunting  is permitted in the deer season.  For December, the permitted hunting hours would be up to apx. 10 AM and after apx. 1:30 PM. Hunting will also be permitted through December 10th, and during the week of Dec. 26th through Jan. 1st. 

    Plan and dress accordingly.

    Rich Guthrie
    --
    Richard Guthrie


    Hunting season Oct. 1

    Richard Guthrie
     

    Heads-up


    Small game and beginning with Snow Goose, waterfowl hunting season starts tomorrow, Oct. 1st.

    Despite objections, duck hunting and deer hunting are permitted on the Coxsackie Grasslands. The persuading argument put up was that there's no evidence that birders are discouraged from entering the grounds even though the posting signs indicate that hunters may be present. 

    At the Coxsackie Grasslands, the duck season runs from Oct. 16 through Nov. 28th, and Dec. 4th through Dec. 10th. The second season elsewhere in the southeastern zone runs through Dec. 19th.

    So, be aware that at the Coxsackie Grasslands, duck hunting is permitted  up to 3 hours after sunrise and then from 3 hours before sunset. And, deer hunting  is permitted in the deer season.  For December, the permitted hunting hours would be up to apx. 10 AM and after apx. 1:30 PM. Hunting will also be permitted through December 10th, and during the week of Dec. 26th through Jan. 1st. 

    Plan and dress accordingly.

    Rich Guthrie
    --
    Richard Guthrie


    Hudson crossing this morning

    gregg_recer
     

    about 2.5 hours walking the Champlain canal trails from Hudson crossing park to Schuylerville was fairly productive this morning. I totalled 40 spp highlighted by multiple warbler foraging flocks. yellow-rumps predominated, but there were several blackpolls, Blackburnian, bt green, 1 identifiable bay-breastfed, and 1 orange-crowned (bright yellow undertail contrasting with paler belly). one spot on the canal trail was apparently the raptor zone. I initially stopped because of am crows mobbing something that turned out to be a very un-impressed red-tailed hawk. while watching, a cooper's hawk flew from across the canal and then a few minutes after the rt departed a merlin came zooming over and then circled back for a better view. 

    --
    gregg recer
    malta NY

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