Date   

Vischer Ferry Warblers

jhershey2
 

The variety of fall warblers at Vischer Ferry is declining but the Yellow-rumps are making up for that in big numbers.  I estimate at least 100 Yellow-rumps along the western towpath this morning.  They were chasing each other, flitting from bushes to trees, and eating poison ivy berries.  I found just 2 other warbler species there.  They can be easily missed if you get bored with all of the Yellow-rumps and stop looking at each one.  I posted 3 warbler pics below. 


 



They are in order: Palm, Yellow-rumped with poison ivy, and Blackpoll.  

John H.


FOTF

Jeffrey Schoonmaker
 

A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker visited my yard a short while ago this morning, a FOTF bird for me.  I'm still missing out on Blackpoll, Blackburnian, Swainson's, and Merlin, but I met my goal of reaching 300 birds in the Lower 48 States during this, my first full calendar year of retirement.  I'm at 312 so far with 314 being my record back in 2010 when Doris and I traveled more than normal.  Spending 2 weeks in SEAZ in mid-April was a huge boost this year!

Jeff Schoonmaker


Re: Hunting season Oct. 1

Naomi Lloyd
 

Thanks for the info, Rich.

In addition, Vischer Ferry has a short duck season October 16 - 22, 2021

Naomi


On Thursday, September 30, 2021, 12:05:09 PM EDT, Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie@...> wrote:


Heads-up


Small game and beginning with Snow Goose, waterfowl hunting season starts tomorrow, Oct. 1st.

Despite objections, duck hunting and deer hunting are permitted on the Coxsackie Grasslands. The persuading argument put up was that there's no evidence that birders are discouraged from entering the grounds even though the posting signs indicate that hunters may be present. 

At the Coxsackie Grasslands, the duck season runs from Oct. 16 through Nov. 28th, and Dec. 4th through Dec. 10th. The second season elsewhere in the southeastern zone runs through Dec. 19th.

So, be aware that at the Coxsackie Grasslands, duck hunting is permitted  up to 3 hours after sunrise and then from 3 hours before sunset. And, deer hunting  is permitted in the deer season.  For December, the permitted hunting hours would be up to apx. 10 AM and after apx. 1:30 PM. Hunting will also be permitted through December 10th, and during the week of Dec. 26th through Jan. 1st. 

Plan and dress accordingly.

Rich Guthrie
--
Richard Guthrie


Hunting season Oct. 1

Richard Guthrie
 

Heads-up


Small game and beginning with Snow Goose, waterfowl hunting season starts tomorrow, Oct. 1st.

Despite objections, duck hunting and deer hunting are permitted on the Coxsackie Grasslands. The persuading argument put up was that there's no evidence that birders are discouraged from entering the grounds even though the posting signs indicate that hunters may be present. 

At the Coxsackie Grasslands, the duck season runs from Oct. 16 through Nov. 28th, and Dec. 4th through Dec. 10th. The second season elsewhere in the southeastern zone runs through Dec. 19th.

So, be aware that at the Coxsackie Grasslands, duck hunting is permitted  up to 3 hours after sunrise and then from 3 hours before sunset. And, deer hunting  is permitted in the deer season.  For December, the permitted hunting hours would be up to apx. 10 AM and after apx. 1:30 PM. Hunting will also be permitted through December 10th, and during the week of Dec. 26th through Jan. 1st. 

Plan and dress accordingly.

Rich Guthrie
--
Richard Guthrie


Hudson crossing this morning

gregg_recer
 

about 2.5 hours walking the Champlain canal trails from Hudson crossing park to Schuylerville was fairly productive this morning. I totalled 40 spp highlighted by multiple warbler foraging flocks. yellow-rumps predominated, but there were several blackpolls, Blackburnian, bt green, 1 identifiable bay-breastfed, and 1 orange-crowned (bright yellow undertail contrasting with paler belly). one spot on the canal trail was apparently the raptor zone. I initially stopped because of am crows mobbing something that turned out to be a very un-impressed red-tailed hawk. while watching, a cooper's hawk flew from across the canal and then a few minutes after the rt departed a merlin came zooming over and then circled back for a better view. 

--
gregg recer
malta NY


Re: Vischer Ferry Warbler Pics and Quiz

jhershey2
 

I failed to mention the best bird of the morning at Vischer Ferry which was my first-of-the-year Swainson's Thrush.  This is my pic of the thrush.

John H. 


 


Vischer Ferry Warbler Pics and Quiz

jhershey2
 

I usually stay away from Vischer Ferry during much of the summer because of the bugs that seem to get worse as you get closer to the river.  This morning I finally decided to venture into that buggy “no man’s land” in search mostly of warblers because I hoped the chilly morning would deter the bugs and not the warblers.  Walking the 3 or so mile western loop starting at the main entrance wasn’t as bad as usual near the river so I kept on going.  There were plenty of warblers along much of the loop although most of them were Yellow-rumps.  However, after looking at my photos I see that there were at least 5 other warblers in the mix but in much smaller numbers.  I’ve posted my low quality warbler pics (and one non-warbler) below with my guess on the i.d. at the very bottom.  Let me know if I’m wrong.  Besides the warblers I should also mention I had Ruby-
crowned Kinglet; plus, Winter, Marsh and Carolina Wrens.  Also, lots of White-throated Sparrows. 

John H.



 


My answers in order: Yellow-rumped, Tennessee, Blackpoll (I think the orangish feet are useful here), Black-throated Green, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Magnolia, Nashville.   
 


Re: Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

rob snell
 

I watched a GBH attempt to swallow a large rat for about 45 minutes. The rat was so big the heron had to lower its head and let it’s neck rest intermittently while half the rat was sticking out of its mouth. Not sure if it ever choked it down, but it sure tried. 

Rob Snell


On Sep 28, 2021, at 4:21 PM, kernscot <kernscot@...> wrote:


I have seen G-b Herons catching and swallowing field voles and mice.

Nancy


From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> on behalf of scottjstoner via groups.io <ScottJStoner@...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 28, 2021 3:04 PM
To: bdudek34 <bdudek2@...>; hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [hmbirds] Great Blue Heron Foraging Question
 
Bruce (et al.) ,  while I don't have specific observations to add on Great Blue Heron, Denise and I have seen Green Heron foraging for insects in a dry field at Five Rivers EEC. Years ago, I also observed egrets eating exhausted songbirds from a spring migration fallout inside Fort Jefferson on the Dry Tortugas! -Scott Stoner



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: bdudek34 <bdudek2@...>
Date: 9/28/21 11:13 (GMT-05:00)
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Subject: [hmbirds] Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

Twice in the past week, I have seen a Great Blue Heron foraging in an open field as I drove by. The first time was an abandoned horse pasture and the second was the grassy area off the west end of the E/W runway of the Albany airport.  Neither location had any sort of vernal pool or wetland.  This struck me a so odd that each time I circled back to make sure that I wasn't seeing a Sandhill Crane.  Given the proximity of the two locations, it is possible that it was the same bird.

Are these herons known to forage for insects/rodents, etc in dry fields?  Having never seen this, and not finding any thing written on it in a cursory search, I can't be sure if I've seen something unusual or whether my expectations of only seeing them in wetlands are incorrect.

Can anyone point me to a literature on Great Blue foraging behavior where this may have been studied?

Thanks,
Bruce


5 Rivers this morning warblers and land-feeding Great Blue Heron

scottjstoner
 

I ran into a large flock of at least 25 or 30 Yellow-rumped warblers on the old field trail, with Tennessee, Nashville, and one Blue-headed Vireo mixed in. A Great Blue Heron continues to forage for insects and voles on dry land near the visitor center! 
-Scott Stoner, Loudonville


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


This week's destination: 9/30

Naomi Lloyd
 

Hey Thursday birders! Warblers are waning, while sparrows are beginning to show up. Let's try the Normanskill Farm fields at 8:00am. Take Mill Rd off Delaware Ave down to the creekside parking lot.

https://www.google.com/maps/dir//42.6349602,-73.8002699/@42.6345757,-73.7995225,393m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!4m1!3e0?hl=en&authuser=0



Naomi





Re: Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

Richard Guthrie
 

Yes they regularly feed on meadow mammals, especially in winter.

Ken Kaufmann mentions their menu preferences in his Lives of North American Birds. And, check the Bent series. It has everything imaginable about bird behavior, said in many words. Although a lot of it was from anecdotal observations in the style of the time. 

And then there's that photo of a GBHE carrying a Black Rail in its beak - and it was one the endangered Black Rail population of the west coast. 

Rich Guthrie


On Tue, Sep 28, 2021 at 4:21 PM kernscot <kernscot@...> wrote:
I have seen G-b Herons catching and swallowing field voles and mice.

Nancy


From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> on behalf of scottjstoner via groups.io <ScottJStoner=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, September 28, 2021 3:04 PM
To: bdudek34 <bdudek2@...>; hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [hmbirds] Great Blue Heron Foraging Question
 
Bruce (et al.) ,  while I don't have specific observations to add on Great Blue Heron, Denise and I have seen Green Heron foraging for insects in a dry field at Five Rivers EEC. Years ago, I also observed egrets eating exhausted songbirds from a spring migration fallout inside Fort Jefferson on the Dry Tortugas! -Scott Stoner



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: bdudek34 <bdudek2@...>
Date: 9/28/21 11:13 (GMT-05:00)
Subject: [hmbirds] Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

Twice in the past week, I have seen a Great Blue Heron foraging in an open field as I drove by. The first time was an abandoned horse pasture and the second was the grassy area off the west end of the E/W runway of the Albany airport.  Neither location had any sort of vernal pool or wetland.  This struck me a so odd that each time I circled back to make sure that I wasn't seeing a Sandhill Crane.  Given the proximity of the two locations, it is possible that it was the same bird.

Are these herons known to forage for insects/rodents, etc in dry fields?  Having never seen this, and not finding any thing written on it in a cursory search, I can't be sure if I've seen something unusual or whether my expectations of only seeing them in wetlands are incorrect.

Can anyone point me to a literature on Great Blue foraging behavior where this may have been studied?

Thanks,
Bruce



--
Richard Guthrie


HMBC Field Trip reminders- Sat./Sun., Oct. 2nd & 3rd

trwdsd
 

Saturday, October 2, SARATOGA BATTLEFIELD (Saratoga County; morning)

Coordinator: Susan Beaudoin 518-796-7868 smbeaudoin1@...

This popular trip features beautiful foliage and a good chance to see hawks, woodpeckers, sparrows, bluebirds and late migrants as we walk the woods and grasslands of the battlefield. You never know what will turn up. There is no longer a fee for use of the trails.

Meet at 8:30 AM in the parking lot near the park's visitor center off SR 32. Full info and map at this link:   https://hmbc.net/event-4382835


Sunday, October 3, THE LITTLE SIT (Albany County; morning-afternoon)

Coordinators: Tom and Colleen Williams twill0526@...

The Big Sit! is an annual birding event held throughout the United States on the second weekend of October. Groups set up a 'circle' at a location from which many birds can be viewed and record their sightings for the day. Observers can leave the circle to stretch their legs and take walks, but only birds initially seen from the designated circle can be counted.

 

HMBC has participated in this event several times previously, but there have been obstacles to overcome. First and foremost, the annual calendar dates occur just after most migrant songbirds have passed through our area on the way to their wintering grounds. Secondly, the club offers annually-scheduled field trips on that weekend, and we didn't want to dilute participation by offering conflicting events.

 

Our solution this year is to use the Big Sit concept, but tailor it to local needs and timing. We have an open date on the field trip calendar on Sunday, October 3rd. The 'Little Sit' group will meet at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center, then make the short walk up the trail from the parking lot to the dune overlook area, which has an expansive view to the south and west, and is otherwise surrounded by pitch pine/scrub oak habitat. 10-12 chairs can comfortably fit at this spot. We'll start at 7:30am and observe until 12:30pm, or later if other people arrive and wish to continue. If you can't arrive at the start, feel free to drop in during the morning and join the group.

 

Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center parking lot, 195 New Karner Rd. in Albany.  Map located at this link:  https://albanypinebush.org/corecode/uploads/document6/uploaded_pdfs/corecode/1-KarnerBarrens_14.pdf   Later arrivals- Take the yellow/blue trail from the Discovery Center up the hill to the spot marked 'the overlook' on the map. 


Re: Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

kernscot
 

I have seen G-b Herons catching and swallowing field voles and mice.

Nancy


From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> on behalf of scottjstoner via groups.io <ScottJStoner@...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 28, 2021 3:04 PM
To: bdudek34 <bdudek2@...>; hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [hmbirds] Great Blue Heron Foraging Question
 
Bruce (et al.) ,  while I don't have specific observations to add on Great Blue Heron, Denise and I have seen Green Heron foraging for insects in a dry field at Five Rivers EEC. Years ago, I also observed egrets eating exhausted songbirds from a spring migration fallout inside Fort Jefferson on the Dry Tortugas! -Scott Stoner



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: bdudek34 <bdudek2@...>
Date: 9/28/21 11:13 (GMT-05:00)
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Subject: [hmbirds] Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

Twice in the past week, I have seen a Great Blue Heron foraging in an open field as I drove by. The first time was an abandoned horse pasture and the second was the grassy area off the west end of the E/W runway of the Albany airport.  Neither location had any sort of vernal pool or wetland.  This struck me a so odd that each time I circled back to make sure that I wasn't seeing a Sandhill Crane.  Given the proximity of the two locations, it is possible that it was the same bird.

Are these herons known to forage for insects/rodents, etc in dry fields?  Having never seen this, and not finding any thing written on it in a cursory search, I can't be sure if I've seen something unusual or whether my expectations of only seeing them in wetlands are incorrect.

Can anyone point me to a literature on Great Blue foraging behavior where this may have been studied?

Thanks,
Bruce


Re: Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

bdudek34
 


Orange-crowned Warbler, Albany Pine Bush Preserve 9/28

trwdsd
 

After observing at the bird-banding station this morning, I walked the first portion (northward leg) of the yellow trail counter-clockwise from the trailhead. At 11:30am I found a sizable and very diverse mixed-flock at the recently cleared, and now weedy open area just before the trail goes uphill and turns sharply to the east. This area is informally (but accurately) known as 'the catbird spot', as one can almost always hear or see a Gray Catbird or two when passing by. There are still grape vines on either side of the trail, they are just farther back on the west side. The flock grew larger while I was standing still and observing, and contained the following species and numbers, approximately: White-throated Sparrow (30), American Robin (15), Cedar Waxwing (25), Scarlet Tanager (1), Gray Catbird (3) (see!), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (4), Red-breasted Nuthatch (2), Blue Jay (8), Red-eyed Vireo (1), Philadelphia Vireo (1), Tennessee Warbler (2), Nashville Warbler (3), Blackpoll Warbler (4), Black-throated Blue Warbler (1) (nice adult male), Yellow-rumped Warbler (2), Black-throated Green Warbler (9). The sparrows were in the leaf litter.  The robins, catbirds, and waxwings were eating grapes and poison ivy berries. Blue Jays flew past with acorns in the mouths and crops. All the others were down low in the birches and weedy areas gleaning insects. It was one of those rare but happy situations in which you don't know what to look at next, as birds flit all about you. Two small birds came down to my eye level about twenty-five feet away, in a downed white birch. The first was a Nashville Warbler with its gray hood and white eye ring, they seem to like foraging down low as I can often find them in goldenrod and similar plants. The other bird was a drab yellow warbler, with a pointy bill and a vague eye line. I expected it to be an immature Tennessee Warbler, but the undertail coverts were yellow, not white. It had white arcs above and below the eye. Finally, a lifer Orange-crowned Warbler. This species wasn't on my radar quite yet, I think of trying to find them in October, when most of the other warblers have departed. So there are still plenty of migrants to come. Bird every bird.

Tom Williams 
Colonie   


Re: Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

scottjstoner
 

Bruce (et al.) ,  while I don't have specific observations to add on Great Blue Heron, Denise and I have seen Green Heron foraging for insects in a dry field at Five Rivers EEC. Years ago, I also observed egrets eating exhausted songbirds from a spring migration fallout inside Fort Jefferson on the Dry Tortugas! -Scott Stoner



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: bdudek34 <bdudek2@...>
Date: 9/28/21 11:13 (GMT-05:00)
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Subject: [hmbirds] Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

Twice in the past week, I have seen a Great Blue Heron foraging in an open field as I drove by. The first time was an abandoned horse pasture and the second was the grassy area off the west end of the E/W runway of the Albany airport.  Neither location had any sort of vernal pool or wetland.  This struck me a so odd that each time I circled back to make sure that I wasn't seeing a Sandhill Crane.  Given the proximity of the two locations, it is possible that it was the same bird.

Are these herons known to forage for insects/rodents, etc in dry fields?  Having never seen this, and not finding any thing written on it in a cursory search, I can't be sure if I've seen something unusual or whether my expectations of only seeing them in wetlands are incorrect.

Can anyone point me to a literature on Great Blue foraging behavior where this may have been studied?

Thanks,
Bruce


FW: [nysbirds-l] FLCC grad’s bird sighting is a first for New York

scottjstoner
 

FYI -Scott

-------- Original message --------
From: "Johnson, Alyssa" <Alyssa.Johnson@...>
Date: 9/28/21 12:22 (GMT-05:00)
To: Nysbirds-l@..., oneidabirds@..., Cayugabirds-L <Cayugabirds-L@...>, geneseebirds-l <GeneseeBirds-L@...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] FLCC grad’s bird sighting is a first for New York

Another congrats to Sarah, for this exciting first sighting!

FLCC grad’s bird sighting is a first for New York

“It’s not a standard job title: piping plover technician.

For nearly a year, Sarah Forestiere, a 2018 graduate of Finger Lakes Community College, has monitored two nesting pairs of the federally endangered shorebird at Sandy Island Beach State Park on Lake Ontario, for the state Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Only 60 nesting pairs are known to be scattered throughout the Great Lakes.

She has kept records of the birds’ activity, taught park visitors about piping plovers, and set up snow fence around their nests to protect their eggs and the chicks, which she describes as “cotton balls that weigh the same as two pennies.”

All this made Forestiere qualified to recognize that a visitor to Sandy Island on Sept. 13 was a plover, but not a piping plover.

She checked guides and concluded it was a snowy plover, common to the southern and western U.S. and the Caribbean. She confirmed her find with an amateur birdwatcher, Matt Brown, who encouraged her to post it on the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s eBird app.”

 

--

Alyssa Johnson

Environmental Educator

315.365.3588

 

Montezuma Audubon Center

PO Box 187

2295 State Route 89

Savannah, NY 13146

Montezuma.audubon.org

Pronouns: She, Her, Hers

 

From: bounce-125911115-79436705@... <bounce-125911115-79436705@...> On Behalf Of Jay McGowan
Sent: Monday, September 13, 2021 11:28 PM
To: Nysbirds-l@...; oneidabirds@...; Cayugabirds-L <Cayugabirds-L@...>; geneseebirds-l <GeneseeBirds-L@...>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Snowy Plover and Common Ringed Plover, Sandy Pond (Oswego Co.)

 

Matt Brown found a SNOWY PLOVER on the beach at Sandy Pond in Oswego County this morning. The bird was still present this evening, on the lake side of the south spit. At about 6:04PM, it took off to join a passing flock of Sanderlings and they headed south out of sight down the beach. It's possible they stopped farther down, but they were definitely gone from the pond outlet area before dusk. Access to this area is best by boat, but you can reportedly also walk north from Sandy Island Beach State Park.

 

Then just before dusk I found a juvenile COMMON RINGED PLOVER on the sandy shoal on the west side of Carl's Island in the bay. I was checking out some of the array of shorebirds there, which included Red Knot, American Golden-Plover, and Long-billed Dowitcher. As it was getting dark, I got on a small plover giving melancholy calls in flight, quite unlike Semipalmated, and I immediately suspected it was a ringed. Once it landed I was able to get closer and call Drew Weber and Larry Chen who I had been birding with back over to the island, and we were able to get some documentation shots in the fading light. Plumage seemed consistent with a juvenile Common Ringed: overall noticeably larger and plumper than nearby Semipalmated. Dark breast band distinctly broken in center and bulging down on both sides. Lores dark and no white wedge at gape. Closeups on photos show no sign of paler orbital ring around eye. It continued to call occasionally when other shorebirds would vocalize. It was still present on the south side of the shoal when we left well after sunset. This flock would be visible by scope from the south spit of the pond outlet, but ID would be challenging at that distance. Otherwise access is by boat, putting in either at Greene Point marina (paddlecraft launch fee $7) or the public launch on Doreen Dr. at the far east side of the bay.

 

Checklist with photos and a recording of the ringed plover here:

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:

Archives:

Please submit your observations to eBird!

--

--
NYSbirds-L List Info:
Archives:
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--


Re: Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

Tom Lake
 

Here is a good example of a GBH that will try anything. Tom Lake


-----Original Message-----
From: Will Raup <Hoaryredpoll@...>
To: bdudek34 <bdudek2@...>; hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Sep 28, 2021 11:18 am
Subject: Re: [hmbirds] Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

Absolutely!  

Pretty much if a Great Blue Heron can swallow it, it's fair game for food.

Snakes and rodents (even other birds) are commonly hunted by Great Blue Herons.

Perhaps there was some sort of insect hatch or a lot of rodent activity that attracted the Heron.  You more often see this kind of behavior in winter, when water freezes up.

Will Raup
Glenmont, NY



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



-------- Original message --------
From: bdudek34 <bdudek2@...>
Date: 9/28/21 11:13 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Subject: [hmbirds] Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

Twice in the past week, I have seen a Great Blue Heron foraging in an open field as I drove by. The first time was an abandoned horse pasture and the second was the grassy area off the west end of the E/W runway of the Albany airport.  Neither location had any sort of vernal pool or wetland.  This struck me a so odd that each time I circled back to make sure that I wasn't seeing a Sandhill Crane.  Given the proximity of the two locations, it is possible that it was the same bird.

Are these herons known to forage for insects/rodents, etc in dry fields?  Having never seen this, and not finding any thing written on it in a cursory search, I can't be sure if I've seen something unusual or whether my expectations of only seeing them in wetlands are incorrect.

Can anyone point me to a literature on Great Blue foraging behavior where this may have been studied?

Thanks,
Bruce


Re: Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

Will Raup
 

Absolutely!  

Pretty much if a Great Blue Heron can swallow it, it's fair game for food.

Snakes and rodents (even other birds) are commonly hunted by Great Blue Herons.

Perhaps there was some sort of insect hatch or a lot of rodent activity that attracted the Heron.  You more often see this kind of behavior in winter, when water freezes up.

Will Raup
Glenmont, NY



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



-------- Original message --------
From: bdudek34 <bdudek2@...>
Date: 9/28/21 11:13 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Subject: [hmbirds] Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

Twice in the past week, I have seen a Great Blue Heron foraging in an open field as I drove by. The first time was an abandoned horse pasture and the second was the grassy area off the west end of the E/W runway of the Albany airport.  Neither location had any sort of vernal pool or wetland.  This struck me a so odd that each time I circled back to make sure that I wasn't seeing a Sandhill Crane.  Given the proximity of the two locations, it is possible that it was the same bird.

Are these herons known to forage for insects/rodents, etc in dry fields?  Having never seen this, and not finding any thing written on it in a cursory search, I can't be sure if I've seen something unusual or whether my expectations of only seeing them in wetlands are incorrect.

Can anyone point me to a literature on Great Blue foraging behavior where this may have been studied?

Thanks,
Bruce


Great Blue Heron Foraging Question

bdudek34
 

Twice in the past week, I have seen a Great Blue Heron foraging in an open field as I drove by. The first time was an abandoned horse pasture and the second was the grassy area off the west end of the E/W runway of the Albany airport.  Neither location had any sort of vernal pool or wetland.  This struck me a so odd that each time I circled back to make sure that I wasn't seeing a Sandhill Crane.  Given the proximity of the two locations, it is possible that it was the same bird.

Are these herons known to forage for insects/rodents, etc in dry fields?  Having never seen this, and not finding any thing written on it in a cursory search, I can't be sure if I've seen something unusual or whether my expectations of only seeing them in wetlands are incorrect.

Can anyone point me to a literature on Great Blue foraging behavior where this may have been studied?

Thanks,
Bruce

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