Date   

HMBC field trip reminder - May 15

Tristan Lowery
 

Saturday, May 15, CENTURY RUN (NYS Region 8; all day)

Compiler: Larry Alden 518-861-6087 overlook@...

This Saturday, the Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club is holding the 76th annual Guy Bartlett Century Run, an event in which birders try to find as many species of birds as they  can in a 24-hour period within the 11-county HMBC area (New York State Ornithological Association Region 8).  A good Century Run (so named for the goal of reaching a “century”, or at least 100 species) calls for proper planning to hit a wide variety of habitats at the right time. Coverage can include the whole HMBC area (Albany, Schenectady, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Washington, Warren, Fulton, Montgomery, Schoharie, Greene, and Columbia counties) or can be limited to a smaller geographic area – a single county, town, etc. You decide where you want to go – and at what pace – to see what you can find.

Reports should be emailed to the compiler by May 24th, in order to be counted and published in the Club newsletter Feathers. Reports should include a list and count of total species observed, hours afield, team members, and geographical areas (counties) covered. Also, please send an email to the HMBirds group (https://groups.io/g/hmbirds/messages) with the total number of species observed and highlights for your group.

COVID-19 GUIDANCE: Should you choose to participate in the Century Run on Saturday, May 15th, your safety and the safety of the community are of the utmost importance.  Please follow all current New York State Executive Order directives and public health guidelines while out birding.  You could also consider visiting some of the less-birded locations in the club’s 11-county area, particularly more remote or rural parts of Schenectady, Schoharie, Greene, Columbia, Washington, Fulton, Warren, Rensselaer, and Montgomery counties.  An added bonus to visiting these areas could be to fill in some blank spaces in the latest New York State Breeding Bird Atlas effort


Re: VFNHP this morning

jhershey2
 

I too was at Vischer Ferry this morning but taking the western loop instead.  One highlight I should mention was seeing Julie's Hooded Merganser with a very regal-looking hairdo and 3 fledglings in tow - very fitting for Mother's Day.  I noticed the same dearth of passing-through migrant warblers but did hear many singing American Redstarts (FOY).  Finally I should mention that Gregg and Cathy's loop from the main entrance to Clute's Dry Dock is a walking route that is now possible because of the new bridge over the canal at the Clute's Dry Dock entrance. 

John H. 


Re: VFNHP this morning

Sue Rokos
 

We just got back from walking from the vischer ferry power plant to original lock 19 and back, found an indigo bunting, two ruby throated hummingbirds (not sure I have seen them.mentioned), three Baltimore Orioles way up high, an earful of cedar waxwings, and gross of rose breasted grosbeaks. We met a man who saw a juvenile night heron yesterday, but his camera on empty, noted the yellow legs. We looked but no luck.

Are the Dozers creating a new path to the river?

Sue Rokos

On Sun, May 9, 2021, 11:54 AM gregg_recer <gregg_recer@...> wrote:
Cathy Graichen and I did a walk around Vischer Ferry preserve this morning, covering the loop between the main entrance road and Clute's dry dock entrance. Highlights included 1 male orchard oriole, many rose-breasted grosbeaks and baltimore orioles, calling common gallinule, and a pair of copulating virginia rails.  Through-migrants were again pretty sparse today, with numbers of yellow-rumped warblers, and a few bt green, bt blue, and no. waterthrush.

--
gregg recer
malta NY


Weekend migrants

Ellen
 

Friday evening, in my yard:  Blue-Winged Warbler and 3 Pine Siskins.

 

Saturday morning, I got great looks at a Veery as I was out walking the dog.

 

While visiting a cemetery in Loudonville this morning:  Northern Parula and Great-Crested Flycatcher.

 

Ellen P.

West Charlton


Virginia Rails and Warblers, Salem

Scott Varney
 

During my 20 mile bike ride today, I was completely alarmed by a single but exceptionally loud-grunting Virginia Rail in a marshy cattail section opposite White Creek on Route 153 in Salem.  It was so sudden and loud that it scared me enough to almost dump my bike!  Funny!

At home this morning, a small wave of Warblers pushed through the canopy in my front yard in the same manner as last year, from North to South. Each time the wind picked up, there was more movement. Included were 4 warbler species:

Magnolia Warbler
Black & White Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler

Happy Birding,

Scott Varney 
Salem,  NY


VFNHP this morning

gregg_recer
 

Cathy Graichen and I did a walk around Vischer Ferry preserve this morning, covering the loop between the main entrance road and Clute's dry dock entrance. Highlights included 1 male orchard oriole, many rose-breasted grosbeaks and baltimore orioles, calling common gallinule, and a pair of copulating virginia rails.  Through-migrants were again pretty sparse today, with numbers of yellow-rumped warblers, and a few bt green, bt blue, and no. waterthrush.

--
gregg recer
malta NY


Bog Meadow Virgunia Rail

Susan
 

I heard a grunting Virginia rail near the observation platform off the boardwalk section of the trail. Didn’t have a lot of warbler action except for yellow-rumps, one blue-winged and the breeders. Did have yellow-throated  vireos, gnatcatcher, Eastern kingbird  and several Baltimore Orioles.
Susan Beaudoin


Re: Extraordinary Sighting

Larry & Penny Alden
 

Jeff,

While I haven’t personally witnessed the parade you describe, there are many videos of this routine on YouTube, many put to music. 

Larry Alden


On May 8, 2021, at 3:21 PM, Jeffrey Schoonmaker <j.schoonmaker@...> wrote:


At 12:30 p.m. this afternoon my wife and I rounded a curve on the drive through the Saratoga Battlefield and were delighted to see a family of plump brown birds crossing the road.  Our minds both said "Ruffed Grouse" before we had a chance to think about an ID.  Our minds were wrong.  In the next millisecond we realized we were seeing American Woodcocks!  Five of them!  And they were not in any hurry to cross the road.  We stopped the car, looked through our binoculars, and witnessed an amazing display.  They were all imitating Spotted Sandpipers.  All five of them were bobbing up and down as they meandered forward!  They were moving so slowly, with a straggler or two turning to go back the other way, that I had plenty of time to get my camera, open the car door, and take photos.  They didn't get spooked and flee away.  They kept up their slow, bouncing pace toward the other side.  I excitedly said to Doris, "Get a video of them!"  She had plenty of time to get her door open and get her smartphone on the right setting to get a generous amount of video footage as the five woodcocks bobbled their way across, onto the grassy shoulder, and down the hill where they finally disappeared into the brush.  

The lead woodcock seemed a bit larger, probably the parent.  I got a good close-up of that one.  Has any one of you witnessed this behavior or read about it?  We will never forget this extraordinary birding experience.  And it came after I made a couple of bone-headed and time-consuming wrong turns requiring much backtracking.  Had I made the correct turns on my way to the SBHP, we would have missed this display completely.  While my timing was way off, God's timing was perfect!  Thanks!

Two photos are obviously included here.  If I can handle the transfer of the video from my wife's smartphone to this computer and attach it to another email, I will do so.  Does the listserve have the capacity to accept and send videos?

Jeff Schoonmaker
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Extraordinary Sighting

Jeffrey Schoonmaker
 

At 12:30 p.m. this afternoon my wife and I rounded a curve on the drive through the Saratoga Battlefield and were delighted to see a family of plump brown birds crossing the road.  Our minds both said "Ruffed Grouse" before we had a chance to think about an ID.  Our minds were wrong.  In the next millisecond we realized we were seeing American Woodcocks!  Five of them!  And they were not in any hurry to cross the road.  We stopped the car, looked through our binoculars, and witnessed an amazing display.  They were all imitating Spotted Sandpipers.  All five of them were bobbing up and down as they meandered forward!  They were moving so slowly, with a straggler or two turning to go back the other way, that I had plenty of time to get my camera, open the car door, and take photos.  They didn't get spooked and flee away.  They kept up their slow, bouncing pace toward the other side.  I excitedly said to Doris, "Get a video of them!"  She had plenty of time to get her door open and get her smartphone on the right setting to get a generous amount of video footage as the five woodcocks bobbled their way across, onto the grassy shoulder, and down the hill where they finally disappeared into the brush.  

The lead woodcock seemed a bit larger, probably the parent.  I got a good close-up of that one.  Has any one of you witnessed this behavior or read about it?  We will never forget this extraordinary birding experience.  And it came after I made a couple of bone-headed and time-consuming wrong turns requiring much backtracking.  Had I made the correct turns on my way to the SBHP, we would have missed this display completely.  While my timing was way off, God's timing was perfect!  Thanks!

Two photos are obviously included here.  If I can handle the transfer of the video from my wife's smartphone to this computer and attach it to another email, I will do so.  Does the listserve have the capacity to accept and send videos?

Jeff Schoonmaker


Century run

David DiSiena
 

Is there a date set for this years century run? 


Late winter finches, Wrights Loop and VFNHP

Susan
 

I arrived home yesterday after being away since January to find 4 Red Crossbills and a Pine Siskin at my feeders. I was especially thrilled with the crossbills as I hadn't seen them before leaving.
Yesterday after a tip from Ron H., I went to Wrights Loop to see both yellowlegs and solitary and spotted sandpipers. While I didn't see the least sandpipers Ron found, I was lucky to see an American pipet who flew in for a brief time.
At VFNHP this morning, I had 7 species of warblers. Black throated blue and greens, parula, redstart, and ovenbird, were the most interesting along with dozens of yellow-rumps and yellow warblers and many common yellowthroats. Brown creeper, veery, yellow-throated vireo and several Baltimore orioles were seen. Most exciting were 4 screaming male rose-breasted grosbeaks streaking through the woods after each other. They were all bunched up together like a big black and white ball carooming around. Quite a sight.
Susan Beaudoin


Oriole Feeders

Alan
 

Several years ago I bought an oriole feeder, essentially an overgrown hummingbird feeder with larger capacity, larger holes, and more robust perches. I tried it but there was absolutely no interest, although I certainly had orioles around. Since I now have orioles coming to my suet feeder often, and there appear to be at least two pair around, I decided to give it another try. I put it up two days ago.

A hummingbird checked it out five minutes after I put it up, but quickly returned to my hanging hummingbird feeder. Today is the first time orioles have checked it out, or at least that I've seen. A male oriole landed on it, but then another arrived and they both left. A bit later a male landed on it again, but seemed a bit puzzled and soon flew off to the suet feeder.

Has anyone had any success with one of these in getting regular visitors? Since I've had a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker at my hummingbird feeder and a friend had problems with Downy and the Red-bellied Woodpeckers essentially taking over her hummingbird feeders last summer, I figure there are other candidates for regular users. I also have an open spot on the same pole where I could add a feeder for jelly and oranges, something else I had no luck with in the past.

Thanks, and clear skies, Alan
Glenville


Evening Grosbeaks and Returning Birds

Alan
 

I had 4 and then 6 Evening Grosbeaks here from April 29 to May 2. They then disappeared and I figured they'd headed north once the winds died down. But this morning I have four Evening Grosbeaks again, two males and two females.

A pair of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks have been here for about a week and a pair of Baltimore Orioles showed up soon after, the male one day and the female the next. They are big fans of my relatively new suet feeder (vertical, two cake capacity, with long "tail").

I added a window hummingbird feeder to their opportunities and a male quickly took advantage of it. Nice to just look to my left, while sitting at the desk, and see Mr. Ruby-throat enjoying some sweets less than 3-feet away. A fun addition added last year.

Clear skies, Alan
Glenville


Scarlet Tanager, Salem

Scott Varney
 

Did an 18 mile cyclobirding trip today and found a single Scarlet Tanager about 1/4 mile before the Vermont border along Route 153 (Rupert Road).  It was calling with several "Chick-brees" as I watched it in the high canopy along the roadside.  A first of year for me!

Scott Varney
Salem, NY


Warblers in Sycaway area of Troy

Heidi
 

Saw and heard a NASHVILLE WARBLER in my apple tree this morning and heard but couldn’t see a YELLOW WARBLER in a large wild cherry tree near the edge of my yard while gardening this afternoon.

Heidi Klinowski
Troy
May 6


Ballston Lake Rec area

Linda M Wheeler
 

A quick visit to the Ballston Lake rec area and fishing pier resulted in many observations of Redwing Blackbirds, Common Grackles, 3 Canada Geese, a Waterthrush (unable to properly identify due to it moving quickly, I did see the long pinkish legs and striped breast). A fly over by a Great Blue Heron was also observed as well as swallows darting around above the water.  Too far out to ID.
--
Happy Birding!


Chimney Swifts Schuylerville

Scott Varney
 

A group of 5 Chimney Swifts (cigars with wings) are flying above the school and campus pond right now.

Happy Spring,

Scott Varney
Salem, NY


Stockport Flats Wed. Am. Bittern

kernscot
 

Raining, cool 60F at 5 pm, Stockport Creek water muddy and tributaries roaring out to the Hudson River as the tide went out.

Very wet, young owl with yellow eyes, downy light feathered Great-horned Owl sitting in a tall white pine tree. Not revealing exact location off Station Rd.

Heard American Bittern "pumping", several Yellow Warblers, also seen Baltimore Oriole, Black-throated Blue also -green Warblers, numerous White-throated Sparrows and Red-winged Blackbirds. 1 pair Wood Ducks.

At least 400 swallows over the Hudson River: some Tree, Rough-winged and mostly Bank Swallows which are traditionally there.

Two adult Bald Eagles at the nest on the island. One feeding an eaglet. Difficult to see how many because of some intense rain.

21 Double-crested Cormorants and a few C. Geese north of the island.

Nancy Kern



Re: Common Gallinule - Vischer Ferry

Dan Leonard
 

Just there, saw TWO Common Gallinules, same location.

 

Dan Leonard

Scotia

 

From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of jhershey2
Sent: Wednesday, May 5, 2021 11:26 AM
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Subject: [hmbirds] Common Gallinule - Vischer Ferry

 

I made a brief stop at Vischer Ferry Preserve, main entrance this morning.  Walking on the main path after crossing the Whipple Bridge I heard a short call note in the reeds which is very similar to one I heard yesterday.  Then I eventually saw a Common Gallinule.  I posted 2 pics below of this bird.  After listening to the short, recorded "keep" note for Sora and the "keek" for Common Gallinule I believe that the Sora I reported yesterday (based on hearing the short note) is more likely the same Gallinule as today in the pics.  To make it even more interesting I heard a grunt call from a Virginia Rail just like yesterday morning in the same area.  

John H.


Common Gallinule - Vischer Ferry

jhershey2
 

I made a brief stop at Vischer Ferry Preserve, main entrance this morning.  Walking on the main path after crossing the Whipple Bridge I heard a short call note in the reeds which is very similar to one I heard yesterday.  Then I eventually saw a Common Gallinule.  I posted 2 pics below of this bird.  After listening to the short, recorded "keep" note for Sora and the "keek" for Common Gallinule I believe that the Sora I reported yesterday (based on hearing the short note) is more likely the same Gallinule as today in the pics.  To make it even more interesting I heard a grunt call from a Virginia Rail just like yesterday morning in the same area.  

John H.

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