Date   

Winter Finches, Latham- 1/19

trwdsd
 

On a walk along the bike path in Latham, I encountered groups of finches in several locations. I heard at least two flyover Red Crossbills ("jip-jip") near the parking lot. The highest concentration, both heading eastbound and then on the return leg, was at the gravel pull off about 1000' east of Chrissie B's Farm & Greenhouse on River Rd. There are many ash and alder trees with catkins and last year's cones, which seemed to be the attraction for the birds. Two large flocks of redpolls were zooming back and forth from the open field on the south side the road to the trees surrounding the bike path. I also heard, and then located with binoculars, a half-dozen White-winged Crossbills atop an ash tree. At one point a group of finches settled in a stand of alders adjacent to River Rd., at eye level. At first it was a small flock of Pine Siskins, but they were soon joined by Common Redpolls. One of the redpolls was noticeably "frostier" than the rest, with no streaks on the flanks (or the rump when it hung upside down) and a different head/face shape. It was easy to follow this bird among the flock, even when they left briefly and returned. I marked it as a Hoary Redpoll, although the debate as to whether Common & Hoary are really distinct species continues. Visually, it was clearly cleaner and paler than its cohorts. There was also a Brown Creeper that flew in to investigate the ruckus. Finally, at the extensive wet/reedy area near the Buhrmaster Rd. intersection there was a flock of 38 Red-winged Blackbirds, which I presume to be "never left-ers" rather than "early returnees."

Tom Williams
Colonie


Re: red crossbills - pine bush

Mark Silo
 

Thank you, Greg. About 1:00 pm there were 10+ working the pitch pines on the dune just north of trail post 38 on the red trail. They eventually flew off to the west.

On Jan 19, 2021, at 9:51 AM, gregg_recer <gregg_recer@...> wrote:


a group of 14 red crossbills right now in the blueberry hill west section of the pine bush preserve. seen along the red/yellow trail segment 

Gregg Recer
gregg_recer@...

--
gregg recer
malta NY


lesser black-backed gull - cohoes

gregg_recer
 

found an adult lbb gull on the Mohawk from the landfill pulloff area. may be the same individual that's been present for at least a couple of weeks either here or on green mtn Rd. despite much effort, no white-winged gulls found. 
--
gregg recer
malta NY


Champlain Canalway Trail, Waterford

Lindsey Duval <lindsey.duval@...>
 

I just walked the section of the Champlain Canalway Trail from Brookwood Road to behind Momentive and found it quite birdy. Highlights include a Field Sparrow, Hermit Thrush, and 14 Common Redpolls. 

Lindsey D. 


DEC Accepting Applications for Annual Pheasant Release Program

Andy Mason
 

In light of the recent pheasant discussion, thought this might be of interest.

Andy Mason


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: DEC Accepting Applications for Annual Pheasant Release Program
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2021 10:30:02 -0600
From: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation <nysdec@...>
Reply-To: nysdec@...
To: andymason@...


DEC Delivers press release
DEC Delivers Press Release - Information to keep you connected and informed from the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation
Share or view as a web page || Update preferences or unsubscribe

DEC Accepting Applications for Annual Pheasant Release Program

Applications for Cooperative Program Due March 25

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos today announced that applications are now available for DEC's cooperative Day-Old Pheasant Chick Program, which allows people to participate in raising and releasing pheasants to enhance the state's fall hunting opportunities. The program is provided through DEC's partnership with hunters, 4-H youth, and interested landowners.

"For more than a century, volunteers have been working with DEC to successfully raise and release pheasant chicks to bolster hunting opportunities in New York State," Commissioner Seggos said. "The Day-OId Pheasant Chick Program is a great way to learn about animal husbandry and wildlife management."

The Day-Old Pheasant Chick Program began in the early 1900s. At that time, the state Conservation Department (precursor to DEC) distributed pheasant eggs and chicks to farmers and rural youth, a tradition that continues to this day. Day-old chicks are available at no cost to participants that can provide a brooding facility, covered outdoor rearing pen, and an adequate release site. Approved applicants will receive the day-old chicks in April, May, or June. No chicks obtained through the Day-Old Pheasant Chick Program can be released on private shooting preserves and all release sites must be approved in advance by DEC and be open for public pheasant hunting opportunities. The program is funded through the State Conservation Fund from license fees paid by hunters, trappers, and anglers.

Applicants are required to provide daily care to the rapidly growing chicks, monitor the birds' health, and ensure the chicks have adequate feed and water. The pheasants may be released beginning when they are eight weeks old and must be released no later than Dec. 1. Individuals interested in these programs should contact the nearest DEC regional office for applications and additional information.

In 2020, DEC distributed more than 31,500 day-old pheasant chicks to qualified applicants. Applications must be filed with a DEC regional wildlife manager by March 25 (contact information below). A "Pheasant Rearing Guide" and applications are available on the DEC website. For questions about the program or eligibility, email wildlife@... or call 607-273-2768.

Region 1 - Nassau and Suffolk counties:
SUNY at Stony Brook
50 Circle Road
Stony Brook, NY 11790
(631) 444-0310

Region 3 - Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster, and Westchester counties:
21 South Putt Corners Rd.
New Paltz, NY 12561
(845) 256-3098

Region 4 - Albany, Columbia, Delaware, Greene, Montgomery, Otsego, Rensselaer, Schenectady, and Schoharie counties:
65561 State Hwy 10, Suite 1
Stamford, NY 12167
(607) 652-7367

Region 5 - Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Saratoga, Warren, and Washington counties:
1115 Route 86, PO Box 296
Ray Brook, NY 12977
(518) 897-1291

Region 6 - Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Oneida, and St. Lawrence counties:
317 Washington Street
Watertown, NY 13601
315-785-2263

Region 7 - Broome, Cayuga, Chenango, Cortland, Madison, Onondaga, Oswego, Tioga, and Tompkins counties:
1285 Fisher Ave.
Cortland, NY 13045
(607) 753-3095 x 247

Region 8 - Chemung, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Orleans, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Wayne, and Yates counties:
6274 East Avon-Lima Rd.
Avon, NY 14414
(585) 226-5380

Region 9 - Allegany, Chautauqua, Cattaraugus, Erie, Niagara, and Wyoming counties:
182 East Union, Suite 3
Allegany, NY 14706-1328
(716) 372-0645

https://www.dec.ny.gov/press/press.html


This email was sent to andymason@... using GovDelivery Communications Cloud on behalf of: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation · 625 Broadway · Albany, NY 12233 · (518) 402-8013

--
Andrew Mason
13 Boylston St.
Oneonta, NY  13820
(607) 652-2162
AndyMason@... 



red crossbills - pine bush

gregg_recer
 

a group of 14 red crossbills right now in the blueberry hill west section of the pine bush preserve. seen along the red/yellow trail segment 

Gregg Recer
gregg_recer@...

--
gregg recer
malta NY


Austerlitz - Bald Eagle photos

kernscot
 

Nancy Kern

 
 
US-New York-Austerlitz - Columbia, New York, US
Jan 18, 2021 11:10 AM - 12:30 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Checklist Comments:     Overcast, Temp. 36 F, ground mostly bare of snow. Birds in the adjacent field and on bird feeders.
18 species

Mourning Dove  2
Bald Eagle  1     Adult flew around the field and landed in a tree
Red-tailed Hawk  1     Eating on a deer hide dragged into the field by coyotes. Deer and hawk ignored each other.
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker (Eastern)  2
Hairy Woodpecker (Eastern)  1
Blue Jay  6
American Crow  3
Common Raven  1
Black-capped Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  3
Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)  1
Carolina Wren  1
European Starling  2
American Goldfinch  7
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  4
Northern Cardinal  1

View this checklist online at https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS79525051&amp;data=04%7C01%7C%7Cfb7573c2661144ec758c08d8bc200aa8%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637466193082640348%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&amp;sdata=Y0Ame7AA86aqG%2FgLu1c2aVwDQ0jd2z84rLgh%2BBcWqDo%3D&amp;reserved=0

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&amp;data=04%7C01%7C%7Cfb7573c2661144ec758c08d8bc200aa8%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637466193082640348%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&amp;sdata=z5F3%2BgWiCbwMGOqj9kVs4%2FcosLs5LwFl%2Fj4fjP0yNII%3D&amp;reserved=0)


Kinderhook- Peregrine Falcon, Snow Goose, Horned Larks

kernscot
 

Nancy Kern


From: ebird-checklist@... <ebird-checklist@...>
Sent: Monday, January 18, 2021 8:22 PM
To: kernscot@... <kernscot@...>
Subject: eBird Report - 3508 County Road 21, Kinderhook, New York, US (42.428, -73.723), Jan 18, 2021
 
3508 County Road 21, Kinderhook, New York, US (42.428, -73.723), Columbia, New York, US
Jan 18, 2021 4:09 PM - 5:23 PM
Protocol: Traveling
12.62 mile(s)
Checklist Comments:     Temperature 36F dusk
12 species

Snow Goose  1     Immature
Canada Goose  1800     Most on cornfields  some flying
Mourning Dove  1
Cooper's Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Peregrine Falcon  1
Horned Lark  25     On cornfield
European Starling  200
White-crowned Sparrow  5     3 Adults in brush pile
White-throated Sparrow  11     Around a brush pile
Savannah Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  5

View this checklist online at https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS79513910&amp;data=04%7C01%7C%7C3b2d8958595e4987f18308d8bc18bc9b%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637466161716688559%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&amp;sdata=73YnGkxhgcp1nHU6gs3Kx35P9QB1t%2F5ORtJqXeBP1Mo%3D&amp;reserved=0

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&amp;data=04%7C01%7C%7C3b2d8958595e4987f18308d8bc18bc9b%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637466161716688559%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&amp;sdata=WjPYd5Wv9w0c5nDPP0e9Vbi2NFN7EJ4Cj%2BsAk8%2B5BS4%3D&amp;reserved=0)


eBird Report - US-New York-Valatie-3052 Main Street - C. Merganzers

kernscot
 


Oil soaked Canada Geese - Coeymans

Richard Guthrie
 

Doing the waterfowl count today, I saw two Canada Geese with substantial layer of oil on their feathers.

I will send a report to DEC tomorrow.

Keep an eye out for any other victims of an oil spill on the Hudson River.

Rich Guthrie


Redpolls, Snow Buntings - Northumberland

jhershey2
 

I made a quick trip to Northumberland to check for field birds this afternoon.  I saw less than 10 Snow Buntings at Williams Ln. and about 20 on Callahan Rd. east of Stonebridge.  About 10 Common Redpolls showed up along the road while I was watching the Buntings.  Then on King Rd. near Homestead I saw a flock of several hundred Snow Buntings and a few Horned Larks, as reported previously.  I posted a few pics below of the Snow Buntings and Common Redpolls. 

John H.


Saratoga Battlefield: American tree sparrows

Marne Onderdonk
 

Walked portions of the tour road via service road this afternoon. (Hoped for owls but none seen.) Did have a handsome group of 6-7 American tree sparrows feeding in weeds/brush along the side of the road near the Rockefeller monument. There was a chattery flock of feathered friends but too far/bad lighting for me to ID visually and not familiar with their calls. Other nice finds include pileated, hairy and downy woodpeckers, northern flicker, red-tailed hawks, red-breasted nuthatch, brown creeper and the Usual Suspects. Lots of white-tailed deer; counted over 20.

Very icy on roads and trails so yaktrax, microspikes or similar advised.

Happy New Year and stay safe,

Marne


Halfmoon Town Park

Lindsey Duval <lindsey.duval@...>
 

This morning I had at least one small flock of Common Redpolls moving around the numerous birches at the Halfmoon Town Park. Snow Buntings also seem pretty reliable in or near the field adjacent to the park as I've easily had them the last two times I've gone. 

More common but enjoyable, the location also had a few White-throated Sparrows and a Northern Mockingborb. 

Lindsey D. 


eBird Report - County Road 21, Stuyvesant, New York, US, Jan 15, 2021

kernscot
 


eBird Report - Chatham, New York, Jan 15, 2021

kernscot
 


Princeton University Books 75% off many birding titles

Richard Guthrie
 

Several of my favorite books came from there.


I bought a couple and have a lot of the others.

--
Richard Guthrie


Re: [EXT] Re: [hmbirds] Pheasant

Richard Guthrie
 

Awww - gowan

That EGGO was a wild fly in (origin uncertain) until it was taken down by an eagle. Those things should be entered in CBCs and the data taken for what they're worth. Feral populations started somewhere and it might be good to know when and where  if it comes to that. Or not. CBCs give us a running history of the rise and fall of feral populations of more exotic species. We have the coming and going of pheasant, Bob White, Monk Parakeets in several places including the Capital District, Eurasian Skylark, Eurasian Goldfinch, Hill Myna, pigeons, ...., ... And no. barnyard fowl are just that. 





On Sat, Jan 16, 2021 at 5:32 PM Larry & Penny Alden <overlook@...> wrote:
As compiler of both the club’s Century Run and two local CBC’s, I can give you the following rules. 

For CBC’s, we would count these species, since they were seen. It would be with a nod and a wink, though. Hey, the former compiler for the Catskills-Coxsackie CBC counted Egyptian Goose for one of those counts. I believe he may have been suffering from temporary insanity that year. He was going to count some barnyard fowl, too, that year but was shouted down at the compilation. Ok. I made that last part up. 

The rules for the Century Run are a little more flexible and up to me s compiler.  I wouldn’t count them myself, and would probably take into account the specifics of where they were seen and what their behavior was before considering anyone else’s sighting. 

Larry Alden


On Jan 16, 2021, at 12:18 PM, emberiza_tristrami <tristanlowery@...> wrote:



Like Zach said, “countability” for competitive listing is an entirely different matter from the citizen science purposes of eBird. I’m not a compiler for any of the local competitive birding events (viz., the Century Run, the Fun Run, etc.), but I have been a participant and it seems to me that each contest has its own rules for what can be counted. If everyone is following the same standard for each event, everything should be fair. Going back to Jeff’s original question, Ring-necked Pheasant is on the Fun Run list, so its participants seem to have agreed that species can be counted when encountered regardless of provenance, meaning that everyone involved has an equal chance to add that species to their total. On the other hand, I’ve encountered Northern Bobwhite on the Century Run, which my team did not count, as it’s understood they’re either escapees from captivity or introduced gamebirds in our area. I’m not sure if there’s an official Century Run rule on Ring-necked Pheasant though.

 

I’ve never seen a pheasant on a Christmas Bird Count and can’t recall their mention in any compilation I’ve ever attended, so I’m not sure how they should be treated. If they are observed on a local CBC, it seems they are surviving in the wild at that moment, regardless of provenance and however temporarily, and should be recorded. But maybe not. Perhaps some of the CBC compilers can weigh in on how pheasant reports have been handled historically.


Tristan Lowery

Albany


On Sat, Jan 16, 2021 at 11:30 AM zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:
I cannot speak for CBCs but eBird reviewers don’t generally use countability to evaluate whether a sighting can be confirmed.  (There are exceptions to this, like when a sighting is rejected by a state rarities committee.).  But even then, eBird generally wants the reports regardless of whether the birds are countable or even confirmable.  Upstate reports of Northern Bobwhite, for instance, are generally marked Unconfirmed by reviewers because it is an introduced species to this area and it isn’t forming self-sustaining wild populations, but those unconfirmed records are still useful for and searchable by researchers who are tracking introduced populations.  Individual eBird users never need to worry about whether a bird is countable before reporting it, unless you’re doing something like eBirding hornbills in a glass enclosure at the Bronx Zoo.  “Countability” is a separate concern for competitive listing. 

On Sat, Jan 16, 2021 at 11:21 AM Ellen Pemrick <lnmp@...> wrote:

With regard to CBCs and eBird – NOT the Breeding Bird Atlas – isn’t it presumptuous to assume that the observer will know that a Ring-Necked Pheasant isn’t “countable”?  I saw  my first pheasant in Nova Scotia many years ago, and honestly, I haven’t the slightest idea whether it was a “wild”/breeding or “introduced” bird.

 

Ellen

 

From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of emberiza_tristrami
Sent: Friday, January 15, 2021 7:17 PM
To: zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...>
Cc: Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...>; HMBirds <hmbirds@groups.io>; John Kent <k2ent76@...>; Will Raup <hoaryredpoll@...>
Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [hmbirds] Pheasant

 

In 2020, the first year of the third New York State Breeding Bird Atlas, a “remarkably scant population of volunteer observers” of over 1,500 individuals submitted over 100,000 checklists that covered 73 percent of the state’s geographical area. Again, this is the third such five-year atlas conducted in the state, following up on efforts carried out from 1980-1985 and 2000-2005 – hardly “too short a time frame”.

 

To suggest that breeding bird atlas efforts such as the one currently taking place in New York are “inconsistent” or “inconclusive” is incorrect and misleading.

 

Tristan Lowery

Albany

 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021 at 7:15 PM zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:

The breeding bird atlas is not “ completely based on observational data by a remarkably scant population of volunteer observers.”  There is a concrete set of requirements for the completion of each priority atlas block.  This includes exhaustive coverage of each habitat zone within a block.  It is unlikely that a great number of Ring-Necked Pheasants was simply missed in previous atlases, and it is similarly unlikely in the present atlas.  (Speaking of which, I’m one of the regional coordinators for the Third Atlas, and we do need people to sign up and cover priority blocks, especially in areas like Warren and Fulton County, which didn’t get a ton of coverage last year.  You can do so at eBird.org/atlasny 

 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021 at 7:01 PM Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...> wrote:

Could you define "locally"?   I'd love to see the data that supports this conclusion. The Breeding Bird Atlas is completely based on observational data by a remarkably scant population of olunteer observers.  I am thankful for the contributions of these participating observers, but there are way too many uncovered areas over too short a time frame to support a conclusion such as this.  Scientific conclusions such as this have been proven historically inconsistent.  Perhaps it is more prudent to respect "that the possibility of breeding populations of Ring-necked Pheasant within our local region is within reason" or that "Our data on the breeding  populations of the Ring-necked Pheasant within our local region is inconclusive in determining the viability of a known breeding population."

 

Respectfully,

 

Scott Varney

Salem, NY

 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021, 4:56 PM Will Raup <hoaryredpoll@...> wrote:

We actually do.  It is called the breeding bird atlas.

 

There are no sustainable wild populations of Pheasants locally anymore.

 

Will Raup

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

 

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...>

Date: 1/15/21 4:23 PM (GMT-05:00)

To: John Kent <k2ent76@...>

Cc: HMBirds <hmbirds@groups.io>

Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [hmbirds] Pheasant

 

I completely agree with Tom's sentiments on this topic. At best, we have no real info on "wild" breeding vs non-breeding populations.  They should be counted as similarly as Starlings.  

 

Scott Varney

Salem, NY

 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021, 10:38 AM John Kent <k2ent76@...> wrote:

Bull's Birds of New York State, published in 1974 and updated in 1998, says that Ring-necked Pheasant bred widely in the Great Lakes Plain, and to a somewhat lesser extent in the Hudson Valley and on Long Island. They declined severely in the 1940s, the recovered and reached a peak in the late 1960s. Since then, habitat loss and predation caused another decline. Starting around 1980, the state released many each year for hunting. The impact of the released birds on "wild" populations is negligible, as fewer than 5% survive to the following spring.

My understanding is that since this was written, they have been extirpated as breeders in the Hudson Valley.

John Kent
Selkirk

On 1/15/2021 9:05 AM, emberiza_tristrami wrote:

The difference is starlings aren't regularly restocked in the wild for hunting. It's not likely that pheasant populations would survive on their own in most, if not all of New York State without this intervention.

 

Tristan Lowery

Albany

 

 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021 at 8:59 AM Tom Lake via groups.io <trlake7=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

The Ring-necked Pheasant seems to be a sticker for some as to counting in CBCs.

 

We count Starlings. Is there a difference?

 

With fish we count carp.

 

With trees we count the London plane.

 

With reptiles we count Red-eared Sliders.

 

Am I missing something?

 

Tom Lake

-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Mason <andymason@...>
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jan 14, 2021 9:04 pm
Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [hmbirds] Pheasant

Our rule of thumb with pheasants on the NJ World Series of Birding was to hold a hand out toward it.  If the bird came toward you, don't count it; if it walked away, check it off.  Not terribly scientific!

Andy Mason

On 1/14/2021 6:33 PM, zach schwartz-weinstein wrote:

Well, all Ring-necked pheasants in North America are descendents of artificially introduced birds, but the species is established and countable in New York.  For ABA purposes, this pheasant is probably not countable because it can reasonably be separated from wild, naturally occurring members of its species due to its location at a release site.  However, it can and should still be reported to eBird, where researchers can specifically search for introduced and exotic birds.

 

On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 6:25 PM Jeffrey Schoonmaker <j.schoonmaker@...> wrote:

So, are we not allowed to "count" them?  I was pretty excited to see one.  I'm embarrassed if everyone knows they are artificially introduced and therefore nothing to get excited about.

 


From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> on behalf of Lindsey Duval <lindsey.duval@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2021 6:14 PM
To: zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...>
Cc: Jeffrey Schoonmaker <j.schoonmaker@...>; HMBirds <hmbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [hmbirds] Pheasant

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: This email originated from a source outside HVCC. Do not click any links or open any attachments unless you trust the sender and know the content is safe.

 

Well look what I found, this link shows that the pheasants are released in the Washington County State Forest, which I presume to be that trail on Blackhouse Rd as our hotspot holds that same name, for youth hunts: https://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9349.html

 

I swear there used to be a release further up on Rt 41 in Kingsbury/Smith's Basin ages ago as well but that was word-of-mouth.

 

On Thu, Jan 14, 2021, 5:51 PM zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:

I believe the state releases them there for hunters.  (Or so a ranger told me once when he saw me walking along the new trail and mistook my scope for a firearm.)

 

On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 5:49 PM Jeffrey Schoonmaker <j.schoonmaker@...> wrote:

Found a Ring-necked Pheasant walking across the front lawn of house #323 on Blackhouse Rd. at the F. E. Grslnds at 3:27 p.m. today.

As of 4:35 p.m., no Short-eared Owls were showing up for the 10 car loads of hopeful folks waiting in the Plum Rd. Theater parking area.

 

Jeff Schoonmaker

--

Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774

--

Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774

 

--
Andrew Mason
13 Boylston St.
Oneonta, NY  13820
(607) 652-2162
AndyMason@... 

 

--

Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774

--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774



--
Richard Guthrie


Re: [EXT] Re: [hmbirds] Pheasant

Larry & Penny Alden
 

As compiler of both the club’s Century Run and two local CBC’s, I can give you the following rules. 

For CBC’s, we would count these species, since they were seen. It would be with a nod and a wink, though. Hey, the former compiler for the Catskills-Coxsackie CBC counted Egyptian Goose for one of those counts. I believe he may have been suffering from temporary insanity that year. He was going to count some barnyard fowl, too, that year but was shouted down at the compilation. Ok. I made that last part up. 

The rules for the Century Run are a little more flexible and up to me s compiler.  I wouldn’t count them myself, and would probably take into account the specifics of where they were seen and what their behavior was before considering anyone else’s sighting. 

Larry Alden


On Jan 16, 2021, at 12:18 PM, emberiza_tristrami <tristanlowery@...> wrote:



Like Zach said, “countability” for competitive listing is an entirely different matter from the citizen science purposes of eBird. I’m not a compiler for any of the local competitive birding events (viz., the Century Run, the Fun Run, etc.), but I have been a participant and it seems to me that each contest has its own rules for what can be counted. If everyone is following the same standard for each event, everything should be fair. Going back to Jeff’s original question, Ring-necked Pheasant is on the Fun Run list, so its participants seem to have agreed that species can be counted when encountered regardless of provenance, meaning that everyone involved has an equal chance to add that species to their total. On the other hand, I’ve encountered Northern Bobwhite on the Century Run, which my team did not count, as it’s understood they’re either escapees from captivity or introduced gamebirds in our area. I’m not sure if there’s an official Century Run rule on Ring-necked Pheasant though.

 

I’ve never seen a pheasant on a Christmas Bird Count and can’t recall their mention in any compilation I’ve ever attended, so I’m not sure how they should be treated. If they are observed on a local CBC, it seems they are surviving in the wild at that moment, regardless of provenance and however temporarily, and should be recorded. But maybe not. Perhaps some of the CBC compilers can weigh in on how pheasant reports have been handled historically.


Tristan Lowery

Albany


On Sat, Jan 16, 2021 at 11:30 AM zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:
I cannot speak for CBCs but eBird reviewers don’t generally use countability to evaluate whether a sighting can be confirmed.  (There are exceptions to this, like when a sighting is rejected by a state rarities committee.).  But even then, eBird generally wants the reports regardless of whether the birds are countable or even confirmable.  Upstate reports of Northern Bobwhite, for instance, are generally marked Unconfirmed by reviewers because it is an introduced species to this area and it isn’t forming self-sustaining wild populations, but those unconfirmed records are still useful for and searchable by researchers who are tracking introduced populations.  Individual eBird users never need to worry about whether a bird is countable before reporting it, unless you’re doing something like eBirding hornbills in a glass enclosure at the Bronx Zoo.  “Countability” is a separate concern for competitive listing. 

On Sat, Jan 16, 2021 at 11:21 AM Ellen Pemrick <lnmp@...> wrote:

With regard to CBCs and eBird – NOT the Breeding Bird Atlas – isn’t it presumptuous to assume that the observer will know that a Ring-Necked Pheasant isn’t “countable”?  I saw  my first pheasant in Nova Scotia many years ago, and honestly, I haven’t the slightest idea whether it was a “wild”/breeding or “introduced” bird.

 

Ellen

 

From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of emberiza_tristrami
Sent: Friday, January 15, 2021 7:17 PM
To: zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...>
Cc: Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...>; HMBirds <hmbirds@groups.io>; John Kent <k2ent76@...>; Will Raup <hoaryredpoll@...>
Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [hmbirds] Pheasant

 

In 2020, the first year of the third New York State Breeding Bird Atlas, a “remarkably scant population of volunteer observers” of over 1,500 individuals submitted over 100,000 checklists that covered 73 percent of the state’s geographical area. Again, this is the third such five-year atlas conducted in the state, following up on efforts carried out from 1980-1985 and 2000-2005 – hardly “too short a time frame”.

 

To suggest that breeding bird atlas efforts such as the one currently taking place in New York are “inconsistent” or “inconclusive” is incorrect and misleading.

 

Tristan Lowery

Albany

 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021 at 7:15 PM zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:

The breeding bird atlas is not “ completely based on observational data by a remarkably scant population of volunteer observers.”  There is a concrete set of requirements for the completion of each priority atlas block.  This includes exhaustive coverage of each habitat zone within a block.  It is unlikely that a great number of Ring-Necked Pheasants was simply missed in previous atlases, and it is similarly unlikely in the present atlas.  (Speaking of which, I’m one of the regional coordinators for the Third Atlas, and we do need people to sign up and cover priority blocks, especially in areas like Warren and Fulton County, which didn’t get a ton of coverage last year.  You can do so at eBird.org/atlasny 

 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021 at 7:01 PM Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...> wrote:

Could you define "locally"?   I'd love to see the data that supports this conclusion. The Breeding Bird Atlas is completely based on observational data by a remarkably scant population of olunteer observers.  I am thankful for the contributions of these participating observers, but there are way too many uncovered areas over too short a time frame to support a conclusion such as this.  Scientific conclusions such as this have been proven historically inconsistent.  Perhaps it is more prudent to respect "that the possibility of breeding populations of Ring-necked Pheasant within our local region is within reason" or that "Our data on the breeding  populations of the Ring-necked Pheasant within our local region is inconclusive in determining the viability of a known breeding population."

 

Respectfully,

 

Scott Varney

Salem, NY

 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021, 4:56 PM Will Raup <hoaryredpoll@...> wrote:

We actually do.  It is called the breeding bird atlas.

 

There are no sustainable wild populations of Pheasants locally anymore.

 

Will Raup

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

 

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...>

Date: 1/15/21 4:23 PM (GMT-05:00)

To: John Kent <k2ent76@...>

Cc: HMBirds <hmbirds@groups.io>

Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [hmbirds] Pheasant

 

I completely agree with Tom's sentiments on this topic. At best, we have no real info on "wild" breeding vs non-breeding populations.  They should be counted as similarly as Starlings.  

 

Scott Varney

Salem, NY

 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021, 10:38 AM John Kent <k2ent76@...> wrote:

Bull's Birds of New York State, published in 1974 and updated in 1998, says that Ring-necked Pheasant bred widely in the Great Lakes Plain, and to a somewhat lesser extent in the Hudson Valley and on Long Island. They declined severely in the 1940s, the recovered and reached a peak in the late 1960s. Since then, habitat loss and predation caused another decline. Starting around 1980, the state released many each year for hunting. The impact of the released birds on "wild" populations is negligible, as fewer than 5% survive to the following spring.

My understanding is that since this was written, they have been extirpated as breeders in the Hudson Valley.

John Kent
Selkirk

On 1/15/2021 9:05 AM, emberiza_tristrami wrote:

The difference is starlings aren't regularly restocked in the wild for hunting. It's not likely that pheasant populations would survive on their own in most, if not all of New York State without this intervention.

 

Tristan Lowery

Albany

 

 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021 at 8:59 AM Tom Lake via groups.io <trlake7=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

The Ring-necked Pheasant seems to be a sticker for some as to counting in CBCs.

 

We count Starlings. Is there a difference?

 

With fish we count carp.

 

With trees we count the London plane.

 

With reptiles we count Red-eared Sliders.

 

Am I missing something?

 

Tom Lake

-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Mason <andymason@...>
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jan 14, 2021 9:04 pm
Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [hmbirds] Pheasant

Our rule of thumb with pheasants on the NJ World Series of Birding was to hold a hand out toward it.  If the bird came toward you, don't count it; if it walked away, check it off.  Not terribly scientific!

Andy Mason

On 1/14/2021 6:33 PM, zach schwartz-weinstein wrote:

Well, all Ring-necked pheasants in North America are descendents of artificially introduced birds, but the species is established and countable in New York.  For ABA purposes, this pheasant is probably not countable because it can reasonably be separated from wild, naturally occurring members of its species due to its location at a release site.  However, it can and should still be reported to eBird, where researchers can specifically search for introduced and exotic birds.

 

On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 6:25 PM Jeffrey Schoonmaker <j.schoonmaker@...> wrote:

So, are we not allowed to "count" them?  I was pretty excited to see one.  I'm embarrassed if everyone knows they are artificially introduced and therefore nothing to get excited about.

 


From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> on behalf of Lindsey Duval <lindsey.duval@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2021 6:14 PM
To: zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...>
Cc: Jeffrey Schoonmaker <j.schoonmaker@...>; HMBirds <hmbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [hmbirds] Pheasant

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: This email originated from a source outside HVCC. Do not click any links or open any attachments unless you trust the sender and know the content is safe.

 

Well look what I found, this link shows that the pheasants are released in the Washington County State Forest, which I presume to be that trail on Blackhouse Rd as our hotspot holds that same name, for youth hunts: https://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9349.html

 

I swear there used to be a release further up on Rt 41 in Kingsbury/Smith's Basin ages ago as well but that was word-of-mouth.

 

On Thu, Jan 14, 2021, 5:51 PM zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:

I believe the state releases them there for hunters.  (Or so a ranger told me once when he saw me walking along the new trail and mistook my scope for a firearm.)

 

On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 5:49 PM Jeffrey Schoonmaker <j.schoonmaker@...> wrote:

Found a Ring-necked Pheasant walking across the front lawn of house #323 on Blackhouse Rd. at the F. E. Grslnds at 3:27 p.m. today.

As of 4:35 p.m., no Short-eared Owls were showing up for the 10 car loads of hopeful folks waiting in the Plum Rd. Theater parking area.

 

Jeff Schoonmaker

--

Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774

--

Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774

 

--
Andrew Mason
13 Boylston St.
Oneonta, NY  13820
(607) 652-2162
AndyMason@... 

 

--

Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774

--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Bufflehead

Susan
 

I spotted one male Bufflehead among 40 plus common goldeneyes and several of both species of mergansers. This was from the dirt section of N River Rd in Ft Edward. There may have been more. I didn’t have a scope. 
Susan Beaudoin 


White-winged Crossbills, Colonie- 1/16

trwdsd
 

We have an outdoor sound monitor (re-purposed baby monitor) here in Colonie to listen to bird sounds. Around 2:30 this afternoon we could hear an odd finch-sound from the yard. Went outside and tracked down a small flock of six White-winged Crossbills investigating cones in several of the pines. They flew off after a few minutes, but a separate male/female pair flew in about fifteen minutes later, making the same call. If you listen to the 0:34 second "calls" recording at allaboutbirds.org you will hear what we heard.    https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/White-winged_Crossbill/sounds

Enjoy the winter finch irruption!

Tom & Colleen Williams 
Colonie 

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