Date   

bog meadow trail this morning

gregg_recer
 

had a smattering of landbird migrants from the meadowbrook end of bog meadow trail this morning. highlights included swainson's thrush, yellow-bellied flycatcher, canada warbler.

--
gregg recer
malta NY


Egret, Burden Pond, Troy

Janet Wolkenstein
 

Stopped by Burden Pond on my way home last evening (Sun), and there was a solitary Egret, busy fishing for dinner there.


Great Horned Oels, Salem, NY

Scott Varney
 

Currently listening  to the incredible sounds of 3 Great Horned Owls in my backyard. I should be sleeping right now, but was awakened by the sounds of 3 Great Horned Owls.  Not an every day occurence, but was impressed by the vocalizations of 3 different individuals, all within my backyard. I will post the sound clips tomorrow. 

Scott Varney,
Salem, NY



bc night-heron - Cohoes

gregg_recer
 

immature night-heron continues near the south end of the dam above Cohoes flats. viewed from New st overlook as it flew across to the north end 

Gregg Recer
gregg_recer@...

--
gregg recer
malta NY


Re: Baird's Sandpiper, Cohoes

gregg_recer
 

Cathy Graichen and I were at cohoes flats from about 11:30 - 1:00. We had a good candidate for the bairds sand. when we first arrived -- broad, complete buffy breastband, and fairly pale-buffy overall, no streaking below, on the large-ish size compared to nearby Calidris. Couldn't study for a long time as a merlin chased the entire group of 2-dozen or so peeps down river south of peebles island, eventually landing but out of view. As birds eventually trickled back to the main channel closer to the dam, all were semis and least, and unlike the bird we saw early on, but that bird did not reappear while we were there.

--
gregg recer
malta NY


Baird's Sandpiper, Cohoes

John Kent
 

Baird's Sandpiper is still present at Cohoes Flats.

John Kent
Selkirk 


Black-headed Grosbeak...Black Creek Marsh

Frank Mitchell
 

At 1935 hrs Saturday evening at the Black Creek Marsh parking area on Hennessey Rd., my wife Catherine and I spotted a BHGR sitting in a snag with 4 MODOs.
See my eBird report for details.
Good birding,
Frank Mitchell


Re: Eastern Screech Owls in Salem, NY

Julie Hart
 

We’ve also had a resurgence of calling from our resident Great Horned Owl the past week, usually in early evening, but also heard just before dawn this morning. Please continue to note calling owls as singing for the Atlas!

Julie, Atlas Coordinator

On Aug 21, 2020, at 01:17, Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...> wrote:

As a reminder to myself, I thought it is important enough to note that this night, with cooler temperatures,  I am hearing the constant calling of an Eastern Screech Owl on my property in Salem, NY. This is the first night of these consistent calls (trilling) that I have heard of this species since the previous Spring season. I love all of the Owl species, but Eastern Screech Owl calls keep me grounded and are reminiscent of the calls of the wilderness. Thank goodness for that!

Happy Birding,

Scott Varney
Salem, NY


Migrant songbirds, Colonie

trwdsd
 

Yesterday morning Colleen and I heard some distinctively warbler call notes in the yard. We tracked it down and watched a Chestnut-sided Warbler moving through the trees.

Early this morning we did a loop around Karner Barrens East at Albany Pine Bush Preserve. Aside from the usual resident species we had a few migrant warblers and flycatchers. There were juvenile/female-type American Redstarts in two different locations, and two juvenile Magnolia Warblers foraging together on the hillside just past the landfill opening. This is where most of the flycatchers were as well. We had a good view of a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher on a sunlit branch, then had another one singing persistently ("chi-lik") farther down the trail. There were also three or four other empidonax flycatchers vocalizing while foraging, mostly "whit" calls, so probably Willow Flycatcher but not to certainty. Two Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were sparring with the interloping flycatchers, it was basically a draw...lol. Eastern Kingbirds, Prairie Warblers and Indigo Bunting were still present. Also notable was a higher than usual number of Red-breasted Nuthatches, even though it is the end of breeding season and they are relatively common here. It seems as if it is shaping up as an irruption year for that species, with reports noted well south of this region and the normal southern limit for this time of year. 

After we returned home in the late morning, a vocalizing warbler moved right through the yard low in the shrubs. It was another juvenile Magnolia Warbler. I haven't looked back at radar loops from last overnight, but I suspect there was some good movement. It might pay to survey your own property this evening 5-7 p.m. to see what you can turn up.


Tom & Colleen Williams
Colonie


Four good ones at Burden Pond in Troy today

Janet Wolkenstein
 

Green Heron (juvenile), Solitary Sandpiper, Belted Kingfisher (female), and a Killdeer.  Some photos below:


Eastern Screech Owls in Salem, NY

Scott Varney
 

As a reminder to myself, I thought it is important enough to note that this night, with cooler temperatures,  I am hearing the constant calling of an Eastern Screech Owl on my property in Salem, NY. This is the first night of these consistent calls (trilling) that I have heard of this species since the previous Spring season. I love all of the Owl species, but Eastern Screech Owl calls keep me grounded and are reminiscent of the calls of the wilderness. Thank goodness for that!

Happy Birding,

Scott Varney
Salem, NY


HMBC Field Trip Schedule- Latest Update 8/19

trwdsd
 


The Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club has cancelled upcoming field trips, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent guidelines and restrictions from the CDC, the NYS Department of Health and local agencies. A list of cancellations is shown below and may be revised and extended going forward as conditions warrant. Please note that the four "Counting Common Nighthawks" evening sessions will be held, but with updated guidance, as follows:

Updated guidance for Counting Common Nighthawk field trips August 24-27, 2020:

Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club has decided to limit attendance to these four evening gatherings to Club Members only. The Albany Pine Bush Preserve staff will not be inviting guests as they have cancelled their joint session. For club members attending, be prepared to maintain proper spacing with other participants, and please bring a face mask to wear in case you find yourself in a situation where you cannot do so. The events may also end earlier than normal, at 7:30 p.m. on some evenings. Be advised that the outdoor public restrooms are closed and unavailable. Thank you for your consideration.

Check in periodically at hmbc.net for the latest updates on scheduled events.

The following field trips are CANCELLED:

 
Sunday, August 30, PEEBLES ISLAND STATE PARK/COHOES FLATS

Saturday, September 5, ALBANY RURAL CEMETERY

Sunday, September 6, HAND HOLLOW CONSERVATION AREA

Saturday, September 12, HAWK WATCHING AND SONGBIRDS AT THACHER STATE PARK

Sunday, September 13, FALL MIGRANTS AT ALBANY PINE BUSH PRESERVE

Saturday, September 19, SARATOGA BATTLEFIELD

Sunday, September 20, SARATOGA SPA STATE PARK

Saturday, September 26, NUTTEN HOOK

Sunday, September 27, WOODLAWN PRESERVE



       


Re: Baird’s Sandpiper Cohoes Flats

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

Reviewing my photographs, I don’t think I had a Baird’s (but did have the white-rumpled). In person that Buffy semipalm seemed larger than the other semipalmated sandpipers, and even in my photos its wings look like they protrude past the tail, but it is clearly nevertheless a Semipalmated and not a Baird’s.  the light at 6:00 AM wasn’t great, and I didn’t get much of a chance to study the bird before all the peeps flushed over to Van Schaick Island.  At any rate it was nice to see some actual numbers and diversity of Calidrids.  
 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020 at 12:12 PM gregg_recer <gregg_recer@...> wrote:
Scott Stoner and I were at cohoes flats after Zach, roughly 9 - 10:30 this morning. We had one peep that was on the buffy side and appeared somewhat long-winged, but I was not sure it wasn't just a semi-palm with a more buffy tone to the plumage than average. We did have one white-rumped sandpiper mixed in with the leasts and semis.

I checked out champlain lock 2 after cohoes, but nothing different there.
--
gregg recer
malta NY







--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Re: Baird’s Sandpiper Cohoes Flats

gregg_recer
 

Scott Stoner and I were at cohoes flats after Zach, roughly 9 - 10:30 this morning. We had one peep that was on the buffy side and appeared somewhat long-winged, but I was not sure it wasn't just a semi-palm with a more buffy tone to the plumage than average. We did have one white-rumped sandpiper mixed in with the leasts and semis.

I checked out champlain lock 2 after cohoes, but nothing different there.
--
gregg recer
malta NY


Baird’s Sandpiper Cohoes Flats

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

A few minutes ago, I had a Baird’s Sandpiper mixed in with several semipalmated and least sandpipers on a rock at the edge of Cohoes Flats. A group of peeps flew by from the west and the flock on the rock that I was watching took off with them. Both groups seemed to land on the shoreline of Van Schaick Island. There are several greater and lesser yellowlegs also present.
--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Ruby-throated Hummingbird fledged

adir46er
 

Today, while visiting one of the locations where we have been “atlasing” nearby, Robert and I looked up ~ 40 feet to a branch of a black-cherry(?) tree to visualize what we suspected, an intact but empty Ruby-throated Hummingbird’s nest. 

On July 7th (photo 1), I happened to catch a glimpse of the Ruby in flight and relocated her on a small limb. She was nest-building, and the fluffy, partially-constructed cup was daintily decorated with a few pieces of greenery.

We returned on July 29th (photo 2) to find Mrs. Hummingbird sitting on the nest, incubating her egg(s). The avian structure was beautifully adorned with a camouflage of lichen. 

Friday, August 14th (photos 3, 4, 5) revealed a single not-so-small chick filling out the nest. After our 25-minute wait, Mother Ruby delivered food. She soon departed, and the young resumed activity of its own, busily exercising it’s wings which it would be putting to good use in  just a matter of day(s). Today was confirmation of that fact. 

Really, how good does it get? If there could be a benefit of Covid, it might be that of staying closer to home and taking the extra time and patience to find “things” one would never think possible.

Rita Reed
East Hoosick, NY







Re: black-billed cuckoo

Cynthia Edwardson
 

Good morning,
Just a quick confirmation that I was back in touch with Zach about the identification of this cuckoo sighting.  I sent him one more photo and have attached all three to our ebird list for Sunday's visit to Grafton State Park..  Zach is leaning toward the id of black-billed but see's characteristics of a very young yellow-billed cuckoo too so it's now up to the NYBBA data analysts to decide if they agree to count the record for FL black-billed for the atlas.  

Thanks to those who sent me follow up ideas.  I love this forum.

Cindy Edwardson

On Mon, Aug 17, 2020 at 9:28 AM Cynthia Edwardson <cjredwardson@...> wrote:
Good morning,
Yesterday Chris and I stumbled upon a black-billed cuckoo late morning at Grafton Lakes State Park.  We heard a cuckoo like sound and were able to watch the bird foraging in vegetation near the shore of Long Pond, east side, near the beach.  Although I've never seen a juvenile cuckoo, this one struck me as a young bird by its behavior.  Chris managed to get a few photos (two are attached) and it does appear to be a juvenile bird based on characteristics described in the National Geographic bird guide.  I welcome differing opinions.

We were also surprised by the number of red-breasted nuthatches we saw and heard on our hike, at least 12.  

Looking forward to cooler temperatures and Fall migration.

Cindy and Chris Edwardson


Re: black-billed cuckoo

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

Any photos of the underside of the tail?  


On Mon, Aug 17, 2020 at 9:28 AM Cynthia Edwardson <Cjredwardson@...> wrote:
Good morning,
Yesterday Chris and I stumbled upon a black-billed cuckoo late morning at Grafton Lakes State Park.  We heard a cuckoo like sound and were able to watch the bird foraging in vegetation near the shore of Long Pond, east side, near the beach.  Although I've never seen a juvenile cuckoo, this one struck me as a young bird by its behavior.  Chris managed to get a few photos (two are attached) and it does appear to be a juvenile bird based on characteristics described in the National Geographic bird guide.  I welcome differing opinions.

We were also surprised by the number of red-breasted nuthatches we saw and heard on our hike, at least 12.  

Looking forward to cooler temperatures and Fall migration.

Cindy and Chris Edwardson



--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


black-billed cuckoo

Cynthia Edwardson
 

Good morning,
Yesterday Chris and I stumbled upon a black-billed cuckoo late morning at Grafton Lakes State Park.  We heard a cuckoo like sound and were able to watch the bird foraging in vegetation near the shore of Long Pond, east side, near the beach.  Although I've never seen a juvenile cuckoo, this one struck me as a young bird by its behavior.  Chris managed to get a few photos (two are attached) and it does appear to be a juvenile bird based on characteristics described in the National Geographic bird guide.  I welcome differing opinions.

We were also surprised by the number of red-breasted nuthatches we saw and heard on our hike, at least 12.  

Looking forward to cooler temperatures and Fall migration.

Cindy and Chris Edwardson


Re: Offering a couple of books for FREE

ConserveBirds
 

You are first and I am happy to send them to you to aid in your birding adventures.  The books will be in the mail in a day or two.

Welcome to the area and good birding!

Mona

 

From: Cynthia Edwardson [mailto:cjredwardson@...]
Sent: Friday, August 14, 2020 2:24 PM
To: ConserveBirds <conservebirds@...>
Subject: Re: [hmbirds] Offering a couple of books for FREE

 

Hi Mona.

My husband and I are new to the area having moved from MN in October.  We are excited to bird in NY and New England and would be happy recipients of your books.  If we are the first, our address is:

 

Chris and Cindy Edwardson

 6 Highfield Lane, Albany, NY 12208

 

Thanks for the offer to send these to the "winner".  Hope it is us!  Enjoy Virginia.

 

Cindy Edwardson

 

 

 

On Fri, Aug 14, 2020 at 1:38 PM ConserveBirds <conservebirds@...> wrote:

I am soon moving to the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia and will gladly mail a couple books to anyone that might be able to put them to use.

 

“Adirondack Birding” by Mike Peterson and Gary Lee

 

“Birdwatching in Vermont” by Ted Murin and Brian Pfeiffer

 

First response for each is the winner!

 

Mona

 

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