Date   

Common Gallinule - Vischer Ferry

jhershey2
 

I found a Common Gallinule this morning at Vischer Ferry Preserve in the "back pond", the one along the west side of the main path that leads from the Whipple Bridge to the river. It was visible from the main gravel path, calling occasionally.   I've attached 2 pics of the Gallinule, plus a hen Common Merganser I saw in the River at the Vischer Ferry Power Plant and a mother Wood Duck with young in tow along the towpath west of the Whipple Bridge. 

John H.   


Re: Night Bird Call Mystery

Alan Mapes
 

Possibly a young owl, calling for the parents to feed it. 

On Wed, Jun 17, 2020 at 9:09 AM Alan <adfrench@...> wrote:
Good Morning,

My wife and I have been out with a telescope for the past two nights.
Both nights we've heard a bird calling (it moves around, so I'm pretty
sure it's a bird). I'm not sure I can describe it well enough for an ID,
but I could check  out suggestions by listening to them at the Cornell
web site. After several hours of it over two nights, I think I'd
recognize it.

It was a short call, sort of a gentle, slightly hoarse screech.
Something like a "Pfweet." It was given once, with tens of seconds
before the next. Occasionally it might be repeated after perhaps just 10
seconds. It was rather uniform with little inflection. It usually
sounded a little hoarse or raspy, but sometimes it seemed a bit
"cleaner." There were also were variations that were softer. But the
word "monotonous" also came to mind fairly early on. I don't recall
hearing this call before, but might not have paid a lot of attention if
it didn't go on for so long.

The only other bird we heard was a distant Barred Owl.

Thanks for your help!

Clear skies, Alan
Glenville
(Semi-rural western part, with lots of woods and fields)




Re: Night Bird Call Mystery

Shelley Gum
 

I know most of you are better at recognizing bird calls/songs than I am, but
I have resident catbirds who talk to me in the garden all day.  Recently I
am fairly certain that they are also "talking" at night; they seem to be 
right out the window behind my chair where I read at night (they also
have a nest in the bushes out that window).  

Cheers, Shelley in Poughkeepsie


-----Original Message-----
From: Alan <adfrench@...>
To: hmbirds@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jun 17, 2020 9:09 am
Subject: [hmbirds] Night Bird Call Mystery

Good Morning,

My wife and I have been out with a telescope for the past two nights.
Both nights we've heard a bird calling (it moves around, so I'm pretty
sure it's a bird). I'm not sure I can describe it well enough for an ID,
but I could check  out suggestions by listening to them at the Cornell
web site. After several hours of it over two nights, I think I'd
recognize it.

It was a short call, sort of a gentle, slightly hoarse screech.
Something like a "Pfweet." It was given once, with tens of seconds
before the next. Occasionally it might be repeated after perhaps just 10
seconds. It was rather uniform with little inflection. It usually
sounded a little hoarse or raspy, but sometimes it seemed a bit
"cleaner." There were also were variations that were softer. But the
word "monotonous" also came to mind fairly early on. I don't recall
hearing this call before, but might not have paid a lot of attention if
it didn't go on for so long.

The only other bird we heard was a distant Barred Owl.

Thanks for your help!

Clear skies, Alan
Glenville
(Semi-rural western part, with lots of woods and fields)




Night Bird Call Mystery

Alan
 

Good Morning,

My wife and I have been out with a telescope for the past two nights. Both nights we've heard a bird calling (it moves around, so I'm pretty sure it's a bird). I'm not sure I can describe it well enough for an ID, but I could check  out suggestions by listening to them at the Cornell web site. After several hours of it over two nights, I think I'd recognize it.

It was a short call, sort of a gentle, slightly hoarse screech. Something like a "Pfweet." It was given once, with tens of seconds before the next. Occasionally it might be repeated after perhaps just 10 seconds. It was rather uniform with little inflection. It usually sounded a little hoarse or raspy, but sometimes it seemed a bit "cleaner." There were also were variations that were softer. But the word "monotonous" also came to mind fairly early on. I don't recall hearing this call before, but might not have paid a lot of attention if it didn't go on for so long.

The only other bird we heard was a distant Barred Owl.

Thanks for your help!

Clear skies, Alan
Glenville
(Semi-rural western part, with lots of woods and fields)


clay-colored sparrow - ft plain

gregg_recer
 

I had good success this morning locating and viewing the clay-colored sparrow that's been present for a couple of weeks along dingman rd in the town of Ft Plain, Mont. Co. The bird stayed mostly on the north side of the road and close to the intersection with Salt Springville Rd. (CR 75). Very vocal and perching up for good scope views. At one point I was watching the bird sing when it seemed like a second song was answering from a different location, but it was only for a few phrases, so I can't be sure it wasn't some kind of audio artifact.

Also of interest was a pair of N harriers with the female appearing to carry food to a potential nest site.

while in the area I checked out the Ames horse farm and was eventually able to hear a upland sandpiper flight call, but never could locate the bird. The meadows and hay fields are very tall out there now.

--
gregg recer
malta NY


Virginia Rail and Chick

jhershey2
 

I walked the length of the Bog Meadow Brook Trail in Saratoga Springs this morning mainly looking for butterflies and wildflowers.  I was surprised to spot a dark bird feeding on the mud that turned out to be a Virginia Rail.  It moved a little further away but kept foraging while for some of the time another smaller dark bird seemed to join it.  After I looked carefully at my pictures I realized the smaller bird was a black, downy Virginia Rail chick - first I have ever seen.  A little further down the trail I spotted another grown Virginia Rail in the open. The rest of the birds I noticed on the trail were the expected ones.  I attached a few rail pics mostly for i.d. purposes. 

John H. 


Mourning Warbler, Rensselaerville State Forest

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

I found a male Mourning Warbler singing on territory in appropriate breeding habitat in Rensselaerville State Forest this morning.  I stayed on the bird for close to an hour and did not see a female at any point, so my guess is that this bird is prospecting, but who knows.  Unlike the second year male that hung around Partridge Run for a while in 2015, this bird was in adult plumage.  Photo and audio on my EBird checklist.  

ZSW
--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Re: Bittern?

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

It is not uncommon to see bitterns in trees during migration, though it is too late for either bittern to be migrating at the moment.  It's hard to rule out Green Heron from this photo.  And Black-Crowned is also a possibility, though they are somewhat uncommon in the area.


On Mon, Jun 8, 2020 at 5:17 PM Dan Leonard <dannyboy67leonard@...> wrote:
Is it too early for an immature Black-Crowned Night Heron (would be more likely in a tree)?

On Mon, Jun 8, 2020 at 5:07 PM bookconservator via groups.io <bookconservator=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I heard a new bird sound in the yard, sort of a squonk. Then saw what looked to be a bittern in a tree. Held its head with beak up and neck extended and streaky brown, just like those I gave seen at Montezuma when I lived out there. Larger than a crow. A bit bigger than the green herons we have had in the yard by the pond. See image upper center.

Would you find a bittern in a tree and if not, any ideas on what it could be?

Thanks for the input.

Donia
Ballston Spa



--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Chuck-wills-widow - Greene County

Richard Guthrie
 

We have two credible reports of CHUCK-WILLS-WIDOW from the Town of Athens and 5 miles away in the Town of Coxsackie, The Greene County.

The first was heard briefly last Tuesday evening and not since. The other was being heard that evening as well as each evening up to Friday (maybe Sunday morning at 4:30 AM ).

The homeowner got a clear recording of the second bird during one of those evenings. 

The birds were heard (and seen) from the roadway on Mountain View Road, off County Rt. 61, which is just north of State Highway 81 in the Town of Coxsackie, west of Rt. 9-W and the NYS Thruway. 

There are very few houses along this dead-end road and the few homeowners are ok with birders coming to try for the bird. The bird seemed to start the evening out down by the cul-de-sac, then working west to the area of the county road. The apparent 4:30 AM report was from a nearby home along Rt 61.

[I am told that there is an intimidating looking, but somewhat friendly, German Shepherd in one of the houses, that might come out to check on people. He is said to not like other dogs. ]

Rich Guthrie
New Baltimore
The Greene County
New York



--
Richard Guthrie


RT Feeding Video

Scott Varney
 

Enjoy this video recorded at 1:46 am on Sunday, July 7, 2020. 


RT Hummingbird Feeding times

Scott Varney
 

I was just reviewing an oddly- timed triggering of my home surveillance cameras from yesterday (Sunday). At 1:46 AM, I'm naturally inclined to ask, "What motion would have triggered a recording at that crazy hour?" The "intruder" was a hummingbird, presumably a Ruby-throated Hummingbird, feeding from one of my 4 porch feeders. I had no idea that they would be feeding at this hour of the morning!  Very cool!  

Anyone else ever witness late night feeding times such as this for hummingbirds?  I'd love to hear more about others' experiences. 

Happy Day,

Scott Varney
Salem, NY


Re: Bittern?

Dan Leonard
 

Is it too early for an immature Black-Crowned Night Heron (would be more likely in a tree)?


On Mon, Jun 8, 2020 at 5:07 PM bookconservator via groups.io <bookconservator=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I heard a new bird sound in the yard, sort of a squonk. Then saw what looked to be a bittern in a tree. Held its head with beak up and neck extended and streaky brown, just like those I gave seen at Montezuma when I lived out there. Larger than a crow. A bit bigger than the green herons we have had in the yard by the pond. See image upper center.

Would you find a bittern in a tree and if not, any ideas on what it could be?

Thanks for the input.

Donia
Ballston Spa


Bittern?

Donia Conn
 

I heard a new bird sound in the yard, sort of a squonk. Then saw what looked to be a bittern in a tree. Held its head with beak up and neck extended and streaky brown, just like those I gave seen at Montezuma when I lived out there. Larger than a crow. A bit bigger than the green herons we have had in the yard by the pond. See image upper center.

Would you find a bittern in a tree and if not, any ideas on what it could be?

Thanks for the input.

Donia
Ballston Spa


Prothonotary Warbler, Cedar Waxwing. eBird Report - Old Champlain Canal Trail--Schuylerville, Jun 5, 2020

Ronald Harrower
 

Old Champlain Canal Trail--Schuylerville, Saratoga, New York, US

Jun 5, 2020 11:45 AM - 1:05 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.3 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: I returned to Surrender March Trail for my third attempt to find the Prothonotary Warbler first reported May 30. Lindsey, the original discoverer of the. bird updated the location, placing a pin all the way at the end of the trail. I started to head that way after greeting two birders already there. We heard the Prothonotary sing loudly right by where the trail splits to go to the Southern parking lot and the spur that goes to the end of the trail. As my hearing for high. sounds isn't great, I heard it loud and clear. It crossed over the trail and skulked North in the brush down the trail. Then I lost it. The benefit of looking for a specific small bird, you start taking very close looks at every bird you encounter, with the benefit of really seeing and appreciating common species. I also found a Cedar Waxwing, a bird I have not seen since Winter time. In my three trips, I also saw where three species of Woodpeckers are nesting: Northern Flicker, Red-bellied Woodpecker and Downy Woodpecker.
But back to hunt for the PROW. After waiting at the old spot it was seen last week and at times today, I went down to the ned of the trail and listened. I pished a few times, and suddenly, the Prothonotary was right near me on a small Cherry Tree. I lifted my camera up and took photos. I kept piching in hopes he would be curious. He was there about 15 seconds before taking off into the swamp below to the East. Other birders I know arrived and I waved them up. The bird called often as he worked his way North agin through the swamp. Then he stopped calling for 15 minutes. He started up again back at the old spot and I left, not wanting to inadvertently scare him away for my birding friends. I am thankful to the birder who found the bird and kept. updating through return trips she took.
45 species (+1 other taxa)

Wood Duck 14 Mom and 13 ducklings still swimming around in the swamp. (Saw her and ducklings last trip, two days previous)
Mourning Dove 5
Great Blue Heron 6 Looking and I imagine sounding like Pteradactyls! The rookery is just North of the area I spent time in today and there is a lot of noise from there and from the birds that pass through
Green Heron 1 fly by, making odd call
Black Vulture 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
Downy Woodpecker 2
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 2
Eastern Wood-Pewee 2
Least Flycatcher 1
Eastern Phoebe 1
Great Crested Flycatcher 4
flycatcher sp. (Tyrannidae sp.) 1 Not sure which Flycatcher this is. It is likely one of the ones I heard, but this is one group certainly more easily identified by call than sight
Yellow-throated Vireo 1
Warbling Vireo 4
Red-eyed Vireo 6
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 2
Common Raven 1 loudly calling at South end of trail
Black-capped Chickadee 1
Tufted Titmouse 2
White-breasted Nuthatch 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
House Wren 1
Carolina Wren 1
Gray Catbird 8
Wood Thrush 2
American Robin 7
Cedar Waxwing 1
American Goldfinch 2 Bright yellow male had me fooled a couple of times when looking for Prothonotary Warbler
Song Sparrow 3
Swamp Sparrow 1
Baltimore Oriole 1
Red-winged Blackbird 4
Common Grackle 9
Ovenbird 1
Prothonotary Warbler 1 This is the bird that people have been coming to look for since his discovery a week ago. The habitat is perfect with extensive swamp, lots of trees with holes and low trees to skulk around in. The problem obviously is that he is several hundred miles North of his usual range.
Common Yellowthroat 2
American Redstart 1
Yellow Warbler 2
Northern Cardinal 4
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 6

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S70133452

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


Blue Grosbeak!

Susan
 

My son-in-law photographed a Blue Grosbeak at our feeders this morning. It stayed about 5 minutes, feeding with a titmouse. Very unfortunately, I was not at home. I’ve been staring at the feeder for hours with no luck. 
Susan Beaudoin
Luther Rd,
Stillwater


Rensselaerville State Forest this morning

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

I spent about an hour on my atlas block at Rensselaerville State Forest this morning.  Highlights were a recently fledged Common Raven, a flyover red crossbill, and a yellow-bellied flycatcher. (I assume the flycatcher was a late migrant.  I don’t think they breed in Albany County.)
--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Re: Red-headed WP Photo

ConserveBirds
 

Fabulous, Alan!  Congratulations on a wonderful yard bird!

 

From: hmbirds@groups.io [mailto:hmbirds@groups.io] On Behalf Of Alan Mapes
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2020 9:00 PM
To: HMBirds <hmbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [hmbirds] Red-headed WP Photo

 

See if this works for the visitor near Saratoga Springs this afternoon:

 

 


Re: Red-headed Woodpecker - Saratoga

Weiskotten, Kurt
 

Great bird Al for Saratoga!

On Jun 4, 2020 6:55 PM, "Alan Mapes via groups.io" <alanmapes@...> wrote:
My wife asked earlier today about a woodpecker she’d seen at our feeder, with lots of white on it. Sure enough, a beautiful adult red-headed woodpecker showed up again about 6:45 this evening. Photos to follow. 

Alan Mapes
Saratoga 
Per Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and other Nondiscrimination statutes, Greenman-Pedersen, Inc. and its related companies will not discriminate on the grounds of race, color or national origin in the selection and retention of subconsultants, including procurement of materials and leases of equipment. Greenman-Pedersen, Inc. and its related companies will ensure that minorities will be afforded full opportunity to submit proposals and will not be discriminated against in consideration for an award. This communication and any attachments are intended only for the use of the individual or entity named as the addressee. It may contain information which is privileged and/or confidential under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient or such recipient's employee or agent, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, copy or disclosure of this communication is strictly prohibited and to notify the sender immediately.


Red-headed WP Photo

Alan Mapes
 

See if this works for the visitor near Saratoga Springs this afternoon:



Red-headed Woodpecker - Saratoga

Alan Mapes
 

My wife asked earlier today about a woodpecker she’d seen at our feeder, with lots of white on it. Sure enough, a beautiful adult red-headed woodpecker showed up again about 6:45 this evening. Photos to follow. 

Alan Mapes
Saratoga 

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