Date   

Re: Bird song

Robert Lewis <rfermat@...>
 


house wren.


Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow




From: "'Louis J. Suarato' lsuarato@... [hmbirds]"
To: hmbirds@...
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:22 AM
Subject: [HMBirds] Bird song

 
Sorry about the previous attachment. I hope this link to a video is better. This bird started singing in the backyard a few days ago and sings continuously. I at first thought it was a pine warbler, but it doesn't perch in the pines.
 


Louis Suarato



Re: Bird song

Brian Smith
 

I agree with Alan here, posting it on YouTube or putting the audio file on a public Drop Box site would probably be best.

I would also pass on the install of the app/program since so many of them on the net have viruses and such.

Cheers!

Brian Smith
Averill Park, NY


To: lsuarato@...; hmbirds@...
From: hmbirds@...
Date: Tue, 27 May 2014 10:46:59 -0400
Subject: Re: [HMBirds] Bird song

 

Sorry, but I don't know anything about the required app to listen, and it wants to access all my contacts. I will pass on installing it. Could you just make a sound clip - or post on Youtube?

On May 27, 2014 9:22 AM, "'Louis J. Suarato' lsuarato@... [hmbirds]" <hmbirds@...> wrote:
 

Sorry about the previous attachment. I hope this link to a video is better. This bird started singing in the backyard a few days ago and sings continuously. I at first thought it was a pine warbler, but it doesn't perch in the pines.

 



Louis Suarato




Re: Bird song

Alan Mapes
 

Sorry, but I don't know anything about the required app to listen, and it wants to access all my contacts. I will pass on installing it. Could you just make a sound clip - or post on Youtube?

On May 27, 2014 9:22 AM, "'Louis J. Suarato' lsuarato@... [hmbirds]" <hmbirds@...> wrote:
 

Sorry about the previous attachment. I hope this link to a video is better. This bird started singing in the backyard a few days ago and sings continuously. I at first thought it was a pine warbler, but it doesn't perch in the pines.

 



Louis Suarato


Bird song

Louis J. Suarato
 

Sorry about the previous attachment. I hope this link to a video is better. This bird started singing in the backyard a few days ago and sings continuously. I at first thought it was a pine warbler, but it doesn't perch in the pines.

 



Louis Suarato


Backyard Bird

Louis J. Suarato
 

I haven't been able to get a view of this bird, but it sings all day in the backyard. Here's a recording. Can someone please help me identify it?


A recording from www.recordertheapp.com



----------




Louis Suarato


Cuckoo

Ellen
 

I was surprised to hear a Black-Billed Cuckoo calling early this morning.  It was probably in the wooded area that borders our property.  Yard bird #92!

 

Ellen P.

West Charlton


Re: Common Nighthawks

Alan Mapes
 

I had two common nighthawks over Five Rivers around 8:20 this evening. They were flying high and circling to feed, but working their way north.

Alan


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 7:36 PM, hoaryredpoll Hoaryredpoll@... [hmbirds] <hmbirds@...> wrote:
 


About a dozen Common Nighthawks flew over my location in Coeymans Hollow, Albany County flying west at 7:15pm this evening.

Good Birding!

Will Raup
Albany, NY

Sent from the Samsung Galaxy Rugby Pro, an AT&T LTE smartphone



Flycatcher Interaction

Larry & Penny Alden
 

While grilling at the end of the day today, I noticed a bird perched on the top of a dead tree.  Leaving the burgers for a minute, I set up my scope to see an Olive-sided Flycatcher doing its thing!  Shortly thereafter, a Great Crested Flycatcher chased it away from the tree.  A minute or two later, the Olive-sided was back and shortly after that the CG Fly chased it away again, this time for good.
 
This is only the second time I've had Olive-sided from my yard in over 14 years and it was good to compare size and shape with the more common Great Crested.
 
With the reports from Five Rivers today, it must be Olive-sided Flycatcher Day today instead of Memorial Day.  Who knows?  Maybe it was the same bird!
 
Larry Alden
Meadowdale
southern Guilderland
between Thacher Park
and Black Creek Marsh


Common Nighthawks

Will Raup
 


About a dozen Common Nighthawks flew over my location in Coeymans Hollow, Albany County flying west at 7:15pm this evening.

Good Birding!

Will Raup
Albany, NY

Sent from the Samsung Galaxy Rugby Pro, an AT&T LTE smartphone


Re: Vischer Ferry-5/24 Yellow-billed Cuckoos, Hooded Mergansers

jhershey2
 

This morning I got a look at the fledgling Hooded Mergansers that Neal reported at Vischer Ferry. I posted 2 pics.  I also was happy to hear Blackpoll Warblers singing in the woods which sound about as loud as a pin dropping, and have a crescendo in the middle of a 4 or 5 note-song.  There also were about an equal number of Alder and Willow Flycatchers (estimating 4 each).  And, one Least.    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/hmbirds/photos/albums/77752785/lightbox/1721356923


John H. 


central saratoga county -- 6 swallows

gregg_recer
 

thanks to sue's note from yesterday, cathy graichen and I took a quick walk at the malta tech park this morning to check out the active bank swallow colony.  hope the sand pile persists.  we also had a tennessee warbler in the 100 acre woods.

we checked a few other spots around saratoga/ballston -- crescent park on saratoga lake, saratoga airport and the county farm/public works facility.  between the lake and the county facility we had all 6 swallows -- martins at saratoga lake, a couple of cliff swallows at the county facility and more bank and rough-winged there too.

had scope views of grasshopper and vesper sparrows at the airport.  oddly, no savannah sparrow or horned lark, although they were in there last week.


gregg recer

malta



Re: Five Rivers Bicknell's

Alan Mapes
 

Larry makes good points on this topic. I very seldom use recorded bird calls in the field, not wanting to disturb breeding. In this instance, my rational was that the Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's Thrush was in migration, not nesting, and that the disturbance would be minimal. I played one single song of each species, very softly (cell phone), and no more. It looks like one other person attracted a thrush 8 hours later (possibly with a recording, we don't know) in the same location, taking good photos.

Will says that these two species will respond to each other's songs, so official ID can't come from the reaction of this bird. That said, the reaction I got from the bird seemed very clear to me. No reaction to Gray-cheeked; ready to rip my head off to Bicknell's.

Cheers, Alan


On Sat, May 24, 2014 at 8:43 AM, 'Penny and Larry Alden' overlook@... [hmbirds] <hmbirds@...> wrote:
 

I think with the recent sighting of Bicknell's Thrush at Five Rivers, it might be a good time for people to review the ABA Code of Ethics (http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html).  In particular,
 
"To avoid stressing birds or exposing them to danger, exercise restraint and caution during observation, photography, sound recording, or filming.

Limit the use of recordings and other methods of attracting birds, and never use such methods in heavily birded areas, or for attracting any species that is Threatened, Endangered, or of Special Concern, or is rare in your local area."

The Bicknell's Thrush is just passing through our area on its way to its breeding grounds in the high elevations of the Northeast or Canada.  It's had a long trip from shrinking winter habitat in the Dominican Republic.  Now that its location has been publicly announced, treat it like an overnight guest and let it do its thing without being pestered by recordings of non-existent rivals.

There are places in New York State, not far from the Capital District, that you can see and hear this bird in its breeding habitat. Yes, it's inconvenient to get up early and hike to the top of a mountain in the dark, but it is an amazing experience to hear these rare and threatened birds singing in the pre-dawn darkness.  And isn't it far better to visit this bird in its own home, on its own terms, rather than disturbing it en route, when it most needs to refuel after a long and arduous migration?

Larry Alden
Meadowdale
southern Guilderland
between Thacher Park
and Black Creek Marsh



Olive-sided Flycatcher

jw.kent@...
 

Tom and Colleen Williams and I just saw an Olive-sided Flycatcher perching atop various trees around Fox Marsh at Five Rivers in Delmar. We have also seen several Blackpoll warblers and numerous Willow and Alder Flycatchers, as well as two Orchard Orioles. While I was busy typing this Tom just saw a Wilson's Warbler.

John Kent
Selkirk


Gone

Alan Mapes
 

Olive-sided just flew off to the north, over the woods and off the property of Five Rivers - sorry.


Olive-sided

Alan Mapes
 

Moved to a dead pine near the Skeeter bowl Pond


Olive-sided, Five Rivers

Alan Mapes
 

I just watched an olive- sided flycatcher working d brushy field north of the Vlomankill Pavilion. It was near the observation platform on that Western stretch of the service road.

Alan Mapes


Mourning Warbler, Albany

jw.kent@...
 

Tristan Lowery and I just saw a male Mourning Warbler along Normanskill Drive in Albany.

John Kent
Selkirk



Schodack Island SP

Eric Molho
 

Took a few friends to Schodack Island SP this morning.  The highlights were the reliable Peregrine on the bridge, several Cerulean Warblers on Red and Yellow trails, Black-billed Cuckoo, and several Warblers including many Blackpoll, a couple Canada and Tennessee in addition to the usuals.
Eric Molho


Am. Bittern pumping vocalizing - video

Jeff Nadler
 

Doing some early morning exploring in the Lake Desolation area, some wet feet marsh maneuvers allowed me to get close to an American bittern. This was the first time I watched its pumping vocalizations at close range and video it.  Here is a link to the video plus a few photos of the bittern. It is the first image -click the arrow.

Along Fox Hill Rd, the usual variety of now breeding warblers, Swainson's and Hermit thrushes, and a very odd  Eastern palm warbler.  Odd because this early migrant should now be on its breeding grounds, and the wet coniferous woods I found it at is not an open spruce bog and is about 100 miles south of its most southern  breeding habitat. Must be just late in migrating


Hope you enjoy the bittern pumping . . . . along with other birds in the background.


Jeff Nadler



New Images - NADLERPHOTO

 


Malta Tech Park trip

Susan
 

Thirteen birders had a perfect spring day for the Malta Tech Park trip. We walked around and through the 100 Acre Wood trails and briefly on the bike trail. Several beautiful male Indigo Buntings were spotted, as were two male Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, and both male and female Baltimore Orioles and Eastern Towhees. Warblers seen included Black-throated Blue, Magnolia, Pine and Chestnut-sided. The later could be heard throughout the trip. The highlight of the heard only birds was a Canada Warbler identified by John and Neil. Also heard were Black-throated Green, Ovenbird, Common Yellowthroat and Yellow-rumped Warblers. We both saw and heard Veeries, but only heard Wood Thrush. Numerous Bank Swallows were flying in and out of their nest in a cliff of sand. Unfortunately a bulldozer was parked next to the cliff and there were fresh tracks. In this same area we got to watch an Eastern Kingbird working on its nest. Three sparrow species were spotted: Field, Song and Chipping. We had four woodpecker species: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Downy, Pileated, and Northern Flicker, The flycatcher family included Great-crested, E Wood-Peewee, and E Phoebe, as well as the previously mentioned Kingbird. Only Warbling and Red-eyed Vireos were heard. Our “Trip Bird,” as voted on by the group, was Barred Owl. It was found at the end of our day, just before the trail emptied into the athletic fields area. This is the same area where it was seen last week. After flushing it was difficult to relocate, but thanks to the sharp eyes of Elizabeth, we all had wonderful looks at this compelling bird. Other birds of note included Great-blue Heron, Red-tailed Hawk, Ruby-throated Hummingbird and Chimney Swifts. In all 51 species were identified. Two misses included Scarlett Tanager,  which was a surprise since I saw two and heard at least four last week, and Hermit Thrush, which unfortunately was not a surprise. Three years ago it was easy to hear the haunting notes of the Herrnit Thrush, their numbers seemed to be way down last year, and I have yet to hear one this year.

 

Susan Beaudoin


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