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During Cicada Boom, Birds Mysteriously Vanish - The Crux | Discovermagazine.com

Louis J. Suarato
 


White Pelican

grossman.bernard
 

I, too, noted Bruce Dudek's post concerning the White Pelican seen just up river of the Rexford Bridge at 7 AM this morning. I crossed the bridge this morning at 8:55 AM and looked for the bird on the up river spoils islands. Nothing was visible. About half way across the bridge, I saw a large white bird circling to gain altitude above the rowing club barn. It was the pelican, and field points such as flight posture, bill shape, white body color, and black trailing wing edge color were clearly visible. I was able to watch the bird make a couple of circles before I had to drive on. It seemed to be heading east or downriver. Having just seen Brown Pelicans flying along the coast at Ventura, CA, there was no question in my mind about my ID.


Re: White Pelican - Report

heather.labore
 

Thanks for sharing the pictures and the video!!

I was too late to catch him/her. I arrived around 10:30 and walked down
the trail but saw no sign of this beautiful bird. Drat!! Thanks for all
who are posting the pelican's location!! It is much appreciated!!

Heather Labore
Delmar


On Tue, Jun 18, 2013 at 1:11 PM, Thomas Williams <trwdsd@...> wrote:

**




Here are a couple of images, and a video, of the pelican at about 8:30AM
this morning:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31316159@N02/9075490815/in/photostream/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31316159@N02/9077768242/in/photostream/

video-

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31316159@N02/9077742074/in/photostream/

There is a trail, with a parking area, that runs along the river's edge
behind the Boat House on Aqueduct Rd. Some "scullers" from the Aqueduct
Rowing Club got very close views of the pelican. We observed the bird from
8:15AM until about 9:15AM when an adult Bald Eagle took a few swipes at the
pelican, forcing it up in the air. It circled overhead a few times, then
headed off slowly towards the south.

Thanks to Rich, Will and Bill for getting the word out, and especially to
Bruce for relocating the pelican this morning.

Tom Williams
Colonie


--- In hmbirds@..., "brucedudek" <bdudek2@...> wrote:

The Am Wh Pelican is on the Mohawk @the 7AM. West of Rexford Bridge (rt
146). Take path behind Boat House on Aqueduct Rd, Niskayuna. Can view from
bridge, but traffic.......

Bruce


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: White Pelican - Report

trwdsd
 

Here are a couple of images, and a video, of the pelican at about 8:30AM this morning:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31316159@N02/9075490815/in/photostream/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31316159@N02/9077768242/in/photostream/

video-

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31316159@N02/9077742074/in/photostream/


There is a trail, with a parking area, that runs along the river's edge behind the Boat House on Aqueduct Rd. Some "scullers" from the Aqueduct Rowing Club got very close views of the pelican. We observed the bird from 8:15AM until about 9:15AM when an adult Bald Eagle took a few swipes at the pelican, forcing it up in the air. It circled overhead a few times, then headed off slowly towards the south.

Thanks to Rich, Will and Bill for getting the word out, and especially to Bruce for relocating the pelican this morning.

Tom Williams
Colonie

--- In hmbirds@..., "brucedudek" <bdudek2@...> wrote:

The Am Wh Pelican is on the Mohawk @the 7AM. West of Rexford Bridge (rt 146). Take path behind Boat House on Aqueduct Rd, Niskayuna. Can view from bridge, but traffic.......

Bruce


Re: White Pelican - Report

bdudek34
 

The Am Wh Pelican is on the Mohawk @the 7AM. West of Rexford Bridge (rt 146). Take path behind Boat House on Aqueduct Rd, Niskayuna. Can view from bridge, but traffic.......

Bruce

--- In hmbirds@..., Will Raup <Hoaryredpoll@...> wrote:


Per Rich Guthrie:
I received a report of a WHITE PELICAN on an "island" on the Mohawk River,about 1/2 mile west of Rt. 146. This was from last night as it was gettingdark. So maybe the bird is still around the area.Rich GuthrieNew Baltimore*(temp. in Buffalo)



Re: Bird with Band

trwdsd
 

Hi Mark,

The bird appears to be one of the flycatchers in the genus Empidonax, which are notoriously difficult to identify in the field by sight only, or in photographs. Normally, a birder is most pleased to have the bird sing, or at least make a call note; that, along with the habitat and some field marks can produce a fairly solid identification. Since there is the single image to examine, no solid ID is easily determined.

However, never one to mind being embarrassed in public, I'll take a crack at it and say that it appears most like an Alder Flycatcher. Contrasting white throat and face, a thin but complete eye ring, substantial pale lore (in front of the eye), a bit of a peaked head (behind the crown), and relatively long winged and a broad, average length, blunt tail.

A recent approach to attempting Empidonax ID can be found here on the American Birding Association website:

http://aba.org/birding/v41n2p30.pdf

Intricate and only mildly mind-numbing reading ;).

I'll leave it to others to advise you on the banding questions. Thanks for putting this up, and I hope your friend didn't take the image in California!

Tom Williams
Colonie

--- In hmbirds@..., Mark Kirker <mkirker@...> wrote:

My friend took this picture of a bird with a leg band. I uploaded to the photo section of the group under MKirker. Its the newest picture, what kind of bird and why the leg band? I think its number 68. And should he report it to anyone?


Mark K
Glenville, NY


Bird with Band

Mark Kirker <mkirker@...>
 

My friend took this picture of a bird with a leg band. I uploaded to the photo section of the group under MKirker. Its the newest picture, what kind of bird and why the leg band? I think its number 68. And should he report it to anyone?


Mark K
Glenville, NY


White Pelican - Report

Will Raup
 

Per Rich Guthrie:
I received a report of a WHITE PELICAN on an "island" on the Mohawk River,about 1/2 mile west of Rt. 146. This was from last night as it was gettingdark. So maybe the bird is still around the area.Rich GuthrieNew Baltimore*(temp. in Buffalo)


Southern Albany County, 6/16

jw.kent <jw.kent@...>
 

I had never been to Bear Swamp Preserve or Recifo Preserve before, so I stopped by to check them out this morning. Both are located near South Westerlo in southern Albany County. At Bear Swamp, the main trail was both overgrown and deeply flooded a short distance from the beginning, so I was only able to bird within a few hundred feet of the entrance. The only notable bird I observed there was a heard-only Virginia Rail. Recifo Preserve consists of a pond and marshy area on either side of Maple Avenue Extension, with no apparent trails other than the road. I didn't hear or see any marsh birds, other than a Green Heron and a Swamp Sparrow. The surrounding trees had Least Flycatcher, Great Crested Flycatcher, Scarlet Tanager, Baltimore Oriole, Yellow Warblers, Ovenbird, Eastern Wood-Pewee, and a few other expected species.

I then went to Deer Mountain Nature Trail, south of South Bethlehem. I walked the west trail, which not surprisingly was very wet. As in most years at this time, Indigo Bunting was singing around the parking lot, Red-shouldered Hawk was flying around and vocalizing over the swamp, and Worm-eating and Black-throated Green Warblers were found along the trail, along with other expected species. I got good close looks at two Worm-eating Warblers, and heard two others. This was all along the west trail, and earlier this year I saw some that appeared to be on territory along the east trail. So, it seems safe to say that there are several pairs of Worm-eating Warblers breeding there. It is kind of surprising that there are that many, given that it is right at the northern edge of their breeding range. There was also a Louisiana Waterthrush singing along the west trail, near the swamp but not near any fast-flowing stream. Seems like it would be better Northern Waterthrush habitat. That trail has the highest density of "red eft" eastern newts of any place I know. In a short walk I saw at least 100 of them.

John Kent
Selkirk


Falcon Fist Pump

curtmorgan@rocketmail.com
 

Two young falcons congratulate each other* on their successful fledging.


http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hmbirds/photos/album/630365065/pic/1541891889/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=641&count=20&dir=asc

*with a little help from photoshop


HMBC field trip summary, Dyken Pond-6/15

Jim de Waal Malefyt
 

Three birders joined me on my first HMBC bird walk as leader on a beautiful
blue-sky morning at Dyken Pond on the Rensselaer Plateau. In a little over
three hours and 3 miles were tallied 43 species.

We first enjoyed some visual birds in the open area at the Environmental
Education Center and had a threesome in one tree - a Ruby-throated
Hummingbird, Tree Swallow, and Eastern Phoebe. As we entered the
Hemlock-Northern Hardwood Forest along the Abbt Farm Trail we quickly
switched to hearing songs from the ever-present Ovenbirds and Red-eyed
Vireos and an occasional Black-throated Green Warbler. A Blackburnian
Warbler entertained us at the bog boardwalk and later a Winter Wren on the
Long Trail.

We took a shortcut to the Dustin Swamp boardwalk and heard some wetland
species like the Swamp Sparrow, Common Yellowthroat, and an Alder
Flycatcher offering "free-beer." The snag tops were occupied by a Song
Sparrow and Eastern Bluebird.

We took a loop in the forest south of Dustin Swamp to hear Black-throated
Blue Warblers singing above the hobblebush thickets and had a male Ovenbird
who surrounded us with good views, possibly, due to a nest along the trail.

On a side trail to the swamp we encountered a Nashville Warbler and had a
Purple Finch and Scarlet Tanager directly overhead. Also, in the distance
was a Northern Waterthrush and Brown Creeper.

Down at Dyken Pond were a pair of circling Red-shouldered Hawks and
Rough-winged Swallows.

Thanks to the participants for sticking it out with me on my first leader
walk and for the fantastic weather and low bug count.

Jim de Waal Malefyt
Poestenkill


Troy Falcons Have Fledged

curtmorgan@rocketmail.com
 


Brant - New Baltimore

Richard Guthrie
 

While watching the high water here this evening, I saw three Canada Geese fly by - southward. A short while later, one BRANT flew by, also southward.

Also here today: two Bald Eagles, several fly-by Great-blue Herons, and a group of four Mallards dabbling casually on the surface as they were swept by swiftly. They flew by up river a short time later, perhaps to take the ride again.

Richard Guthrie
New Baltimore


Re: Cliff Swallows @ Normanskill Farm - 5/28

Naomi Lloyd
 

Tristan, thanks for the heads-up on the Cliff Swallows. I went out to Normanskill Farm this afternoon and found them nesting in the eaves of the first building on the right -- the old Blacksmith shop. One was in its mud nest, and the other flew in with food. I didn't hear or see any young, but the creek was deafeningly loud and might have drowned them out.

Naomi Lloyd
West Sand Lake

http://kestrelhill.wordpress.com

--- In hmbirds@..., Tristan Lowery <tristanlowery@...> wrote:

Currently viewing two CLIFF SWALLOWs at Normanskill Farm. First noticed
them flying around, then tracked them back to the largest farm building on
the right side of the path walking in towards "The Tree". The building with
the weather-vane on top. They're flying out of the near-corner eaves of the
windowed face of this building.

Bird every bird!

Tristan Lowery
Albany


HMBC trips this weekend (6/15, 6/16)

idgres
 

Both trips this weekend may be impacted by the rain this week. Appropriate footwear for wet muddy terrain should be worn!

Dyken Pond Environmental Education Center

June 15, 2013 - 7:30am - 12:00pm
Coordinator: Jim de Waal Malefyt 283-2362 dewaalmalefyt@...

Dyken Pond Environmental Education Center is located on the Rensselaer Plateau near Cropseyville. It is an elevated wet woodlands with a system of loop trails. This trip will take the group down to the edge of the pond, then through thick woodlands, across the boardwalk at Dustin Swamp and back to the entrance road. Birds such as Blackburnian, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green and Magnolia Warbler, Ovenbird, and Blue-headed Vireo are common, along with Scarlet Tanager, Swamp Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow and Dark-eyed Junco. It is a wet environment so proper footwear is advised.
Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the Walmart Plaza on Route 7 (760 Hoosick Road) in Troy, at the plaza entrance directly across the road from Dunkin' Donuts.

H. G. Reist Sanctuary

June 16, 2013 - 8:00am - 12:00pm
Coordinator: Don Gresens 370-3923 dgresens@...

Join us at the Club's sanctuary to look and listen for summer and year-round resident species and to try to add new species to the sanctuary's bird list. The sanctuary is a woodland habitat, so woodland species are the highlight of this trip. Several species of thrushes, flycatchers, vireos and warblers as well as woodpeckers, wrens, and Scarlet Tanager have been observed here. The walk is on easy, level trails.
Meet at 8:00 a.m. at the Hummingbird Manor entrance on Oakmont Street in Niskayuna.

Don Gresens
518-370-3923/518-269-9161
dgresens@...


Birdline for June 12

philwhitney17
 

Birdline for week ending June 12:
Only 9 reports this week.

Best birds:
SNOW GOOSE: Glenmont 6/7.
GREAT EGRET: Athens 6/12 (4).
BLACK VULTURE: Knox 6/9.
UPLAND SANDPIPER: Ames 6/6.
WILSON'S SNIPE: Ames 6/6.
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO: Burnt Hills 6/7.
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW: Root 6/6.

Thanks to Philippa Dunne (Knox), Rich Guthrie (Glenmont, Athens), Naomi King (Ames, Root), Bill Lee (Ames, Root), Susan Stewart (Burnt Hills) and Tom Williams (Max Shaul SP, Burnt-Rossman SF, North Blenheim).


Great Egrets & extralimital White Pelican

Richard Guthrie
 

There were 4 GREAT EGRETS flying down the Hudson River at Athens last
evening.



And, a White Pelican was seen at Poughkeepsie Sunday evening. Since then it
(or another) was seen at Piermont, Rockland Co., and Dobbs Ferry,
Westchester Co.



Rich Guthrie

New Baltimore


Black vultures

philippa.dunne
 

We have seen a black vulture twice in recent weeks eating carrion on Rte 443 near 254, and saw one last week flying over the toll both for the Rip Van Winkle.


HMBC field trip summary, Schoharie County- 6/8

trwdsd
 

Seven birders visited three sites in Schoharie County on Saturday morning, enduring a foggy, damp start to the day. By noon, the sun was poking through the clouds and it warmed up nicely. As a group we observed sixty-eight species, although we missed our two target birds at the first stop.

That first stop was at Max Shaul State Park in Fultonham, where our vehicles were parked, but the group actually went up Old Rt. 30 (closed) just outside the eastern boundary of the park. The overgrown, but still navigable blacktop roadway runs for about a mile, rising up above Schoharie Creek and away from the road noise of Rt. 30. Highlights were Eastern Wood-pewee, Great Crested Flycatcher, Yellow-throated Vireo, Veery, Wood Thrush, many Black-and-white Warblers, and an Indigo Bunting. We dipped on Cerulean and Canada Warblers, both of which had been detected regularly in previous years.

Up at Burnt-Rossman Hills State Forest, elevation 2000 ft., we observed a striking male Blackburnian Warbler at the top of a pine, and heard several more of his ilk. Other common species noted were Common Raven, Brown Creeper, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, White-throated Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco and a surprising Nashville Warbler, which was heard only, but repeated its standard song multiple times.

The third stop for the group was at the NY Power Authority Visitor Center in N. Blenheim, where we briefly toured the exhibits and wildlife room at the center (highly recommended), then walked for an hour, around the marsh out front, and along part of the Bluebird Trail that heads down to Mine Kill State Park to the south. The open, scrubby habitat near the reservoir produced Northern Flicker, Pileated Woodpecker, Eastern Kingbird, Blue-winged Warbler, two Prairie Warblers, and a flyby Bald Eagle during the species compilation.

Each of the three locations we visited could be its own trip destination. I would especially encourage further exploration of the NYPA to Mine Kill SP corridor. Birds await us there.

Thank you to all the participants for a fun six hours of birding in three distinctly different habitats. We saw many Red Efts and Red-backed salamanders, too.


Tom Williams
Colonie


Snow Goose - Glenmont, Albany Co.

Richard Guthrie
 

This afternoon, there is a late SNOW GOOSE in with about 6 Canada Geese in
the cornfield off Rt. 144 at Read Rd.; and also one Red-tailed Hawk.



Rich Guthrie

New Baltimore

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