Date   

Snow Goose - Glenmont, Albany Co.

Richard Guthrie
 

This afternoon, there is a late SNOW GOOSE in with about 6 Canada Geese in
the cornfield off Rt. 144 at Read Rd.; and also one Red-tailed Hawk.



Rich Guthrie

New Baltimore


Re: Upland Sandpiper - Ames, NY

naomiking
 

Thanks to you both! This makes a lot of sense, since it didn't sound quite right for a Grasshopper Sparrow but now that I listen to it, sounds exactly right for a Clay-colored!

--- In hmbirds@..., Will Raup <Hoaryredpoll@...> wrote:

I concur with Tom that it is a Clay-colored Sparrow. A really nice bird for this area!
Will RaupAlbany, NY

To: naomiking@...; hmbirds@...
From: trwdsd@...
Date: Fri, 7 Jun 2013 01:37:19 +0000
Subject: [HMBirds] Re: Upland Sandpiper - Ames, NY


























Hi Naomi,



Your sparrow picture appears to me to be a Clay-colored Sparrow! Notice the gray nape, the bold white eyebrow, the buffy cheek surrounded by a dark moustache below and a dark eyeline above, and the white malar above the dark lateral throat stripe. Could you hear its song? Nice bird.



Tom Williams

Colonie





















Plateau Mountain Breeding Bird Survey

Steve M. Chorvas
 

Plateau Mountain, Greene County
Monday, 03 June and Wednesday, 05 June 2013

This year I conducted two early morning breeding bird surveys on the
summit of Plateau Mountain in the Catskills for the Vermont Center for
Ecostudies Mountain Birdwatch program (one on the north end of the
two-mile long plateau, the second on my traditional south end).
Employing six 20-minute point counts/survey, the effort starts before
sunrise and attempts to document the presence of Bicknell's Thrush and
six additional target species that breed in the high-elevation
coniferous forest.

Weather conditions were ideal on 05 June, with cold temperatures (48°
F), clear skies and relatively little wind. The combination of clear
crisp skies and lack of light pollution made for spectacular star gazing
on Plateau's dark summit ledge overlook. Conditions Monday were
noticeably warmer and much more humid with temperatures ranging from
62-65° F with intermittent light rain at the summit, followed by cloudy
skies later in the morning.

Highlights from the mountain (including the early morning ascent in
darkness, survey period, post-count walk across the plateau, and the
lower elevation descent) include approximately 15 Bicknell's Thrush, 12
Swainson's Thrush, 10 Yellow-bellied Flycatchers, 10 Blackpoll Warblers,
9 Winter Wrens, 12 Magnolia Warblers, 8 White-throated Sparrows, 5
Red-breasted Nuthatches, 12 Golden-crowned Kinglets, 6 Purple Finches, 5
Dark-eyed Juncos, and a singing male Mourning Warbler in the same
location I have encountered a singing male in several recent past years.
Blackburnian and Yellow-rumped Warblers were also present in typically
good numbers at higher elevations. Overall, numbers of most species
were down compared to previous years, and Bicknell's Thrush in
particular were detected in notably fewer instances. As is often the
case, most birds were heard vocalizing, but one Bicknell's Thrush
silently flew in during a point count and perched 15 feet away on an
exposed branch at eye level, providing an uncommonly good look at this
dense forest dweller.

I did not detect Northern Saw-whet Owl, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, or Canada
Warbler this year. The traditional Barred Owl was once again calling
from Devil's Tombstone on both nights, and I encountered another
interesting moth phenomenon. On the 03 ascent under warm, humid
conditions, there were literally thousands of small non-descript moths
flying at low and mid elevations, including into my headlamp. This moth
has been present in good numbers in some previous years, but this past
Monday was the largest and most widespread flight I have ever
encountered on this mountain. Remarkably, there were NO moths flying
two nights later during the colder June 05 ascent. Temperature related,
or a highly synchronized and limited flight period?

Following the survey, I descended the mountain and encountered another
singing Mourning Warbler apparently on territory in Stony Clove Notch,
and discovered several locations hosting Pepper and Salt Skippers. I
also noted numerous roadkill moths and butterflies along the shoulder of
Rte. 214, including the remains of a Luna Moth, and many flying Tiger
Swallowtails. The extremely steep sides of Hunter and Plateau Mountain
flank Stony Clove Notch and apparently effectively funnel leps out onto
Rte 214 where they encounter high-speed traffic and significant
mortality.


The following is a complete list of bird species encountered on Plateau
Mountain over the two-day period (adjusted to avoid duplication):

Barred Owl (1- vocalizing on the ascent)
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Hairy Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (10)
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay (3)
Common Raven (2)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (5)
Brown Creeper (4)
Winter Wren (9)
Golden-crowned Kinglet (12)
Bicknell's Thrush (15)
Swainson's Thrush (12)
Hermit Thrush (6)
Cedar Waxwing (1)
Magnolia Warbler (12)
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler (typically numerous)
Black-throated Green Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler (typically numerous)
Blackpoll Warbler (10)
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Ovenbird
Mourning Warbler (1)
Scarlet Tanager
White-throated Sparrow (8)
Dark-eyed Junco (4)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Purple Finch (6)


Steve M. Chorvas
Saugerties, NY


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Turkey

Alan
 

A lone, very wet Turkey walking across our front yard.

Under soggy skies, Alan
Glenville


birds today

susan r stewart
 

Killdeer 2 adults in separate locations on same local walk:
one alone; another with 2 offspring which were foraging both adults calling
on alert..

Bob-o-Links in local UNCUT field many calling and active(not as prevalent
this season as Rw Blackbird..

both Barn and Tree Swallows active with insect hawking and nest protecting.
Eastern KingBird is spotted often

Norther Flicker spotted several times

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker- 2 adults/think one Juvenile interacting? not sure
always near local big Willow tree..
hear Red-bellied Woodpecker almost every day
see signs of Pileated

hear Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Green(sounded off) and GB Heron today

Blue Jays nesting and visible

Ovenbird(s) keepin company

Sue Stewart
Burnt Hills



active season for songs no ID etc.


This Weekend at HMBC (6/8, 6/9)

idgres
 

Birding Schoharie County

Saturday, June 8, 2013 - 7:00am - 2:00pm
Coordinators: Tom & Colleen Williams 857-2176 trwdsd@...
This trip could have some weather problems due to the passing effects of the hurricane. At present it looks like we will be west of the rain. Watch HMBirds for any changes.

We will spend the morning visiting sites that will introduce participants to a variety of habitats and many of the resident birds of Schoharie County. Old Route 30 on the eastern side of Max V. Shaul State Park rises above the creek and hosts a diverse group of woodland birds. Canada, Black-and-white and Cerulean Warblers breed there, and Cliff Swallows are seen along the creek by the Route 30 bridge. Burnt-Rossman Hills State Forest has extensive stands of conifers along with the higher elevation breeders including Blackburnian Warbler, Blue-headed Vireo, Purple Finch and Common Raven. We will also stop at the NY Power Authority site in North Blenheim, which offers a visitors center observation area, before continuing on to the nature trail there. This area offers open scrub, edge and marsh habitat, along with the nearby reservoir.

Meet at 7:00 a.m. at Colonie Center in Albany, Sears Auto Center at the intersection of Central Ave. and Wolf Rd. We will be on the Wolf Rd. side of Sears Auto Center. Please contact the trip coordinator if you plan to attend.



Shenentaha Creek Park/Zim Smith Trail

Sunday, June 9, 2013 - 8:15am - 12:00pm
Coordinator: Ellen Pemrick 882-9163 lnmp@...

On this trip, we'll look for thrushes, warblers, vireos, and other spring migrants within the park. We will also walk for up to a mile south along the Zim Smith Trail, which traverses wooded areas and offers views of a ravine on one side. Keep in mind that the paved trail is used by cyclists and joggers, so we'll need to stay along the outer edges of the corridor.

Meet in the main parking lot at Shenentaha Creek Park at 8:15 AM.
Directions: Take the Northway (I-87) to Exit 12 and head west on Route 67. Continue on 67 until it intersects East Line Road at a stop light; you'll see a Stewarts across the street. Turn left on East Line and drive about 1/2 mile to the park entrance on your left. Follow the entrance road to the parking area.

Don Gresens
dgresens@...
518-269-9161


Re: Upland Sandpiper - Ames, NY

Will Raup
 

I concur with Tom that it is a Clay-colored Sparrow. A really nice bird for this area!
Will RaupAlbany, NY

To: naomiking@...; hmbirds@...
From: trwdsd@...
Date: Fri, 7 Jun 2013 01:37:19 +0000
Subject: [HMBirds] Re: Upland Sandpiper - Ames, NY


























Hi Naomi,



Your sparrow picture appears to me to be a Clay-colored Sparrow! Notice the gray nape, the bold white eyebrow, the buffy cheek surrounded by a dark moustache below and a dark eyeline above, and the white malar above the dark lateral throat stripe. Could you hear its song? Nice bird.



Tom Williams

Colonie


Re: Upland Sandpiper - Ames, NY

trwdsd
 

Hi Naomi,

Your sparrow picture appears to me to be a Clay-colored Sparrow! Notice the gray nape, the bold white eyebrow, the buffy cheek surrounded by a dark moustache below and a dark eyeline above, and the white malar above the dark lateral throat stripe. Could you hear its song? Nice bird.

Tom Williams
Colonie


FW: enjoy

george steele
 


Bobolink at Five Rivers

Louis J. Suarato
 

This bobolink was in the open field off the Wild Turkey trail by the
observation deck with the binoculars.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hmbirds/photos/album/7394257/pic/1699650789/vi
ew?picmode=
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hmbirds/photos/album/7394257/pic/1699650789/v
iew?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc>
&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc



Louis Suarato


Upland Sandpiper - Ames, NY

naomiking
 


June 5 Birdline

philwhitney17
 

Birdline for May 31- June 5:

Best of the week:
COMMON LOON: Myosotis Lake 6/5 (2).
COMMON NIGHTHAWK: Colonie 5/31; Troy 5/31.
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO: Schodack Island 6/1.
BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO: Guilderland 6/5.
CLIFF SWALLOW: Ballston Spa 6/2.
CAPE MAY WARBLER: Washington County 5/31.
CERULEAN WARBLER: Schodack Island 6/1 (4), 6/2.
HOODED WARBLER: Slingerlands 6/3, 6/5.
VESPER SPARROW: Saratoga County Airport 6/1.
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW: Saratoga County Airport 6/1.

No new arrivals or transients were reported this week.

Thanks to Mona Bearor (Washington County), Susan Beaudoin (Ballston Spa), Bruce Dudek (Slingerlands), Deb Ferguson (Schodack Island), John Kent (Bethlehem), Alan Schroeder (Guilderland), Scott Stoner (Saratoga County Airport), Louis Suarato (Myosotis Lake), and Tom Williams (Schodack Island, Slingerlands).


Loons on Lake Myositis

Louis J. Suarato
 

If you'd like to observe the interactions between an adult and juvenile Loon, I encourage you to visit Lake Myosotis. Today they were near the shore by the canoe storage. I posted a couple of photos on the club's Yahoo site.

Louis Suarato


Re: Hooded Warbler, Slingerlands- 6/3

bdudek34
 

I was able to find Tom's Hooded Warbler on the Rail Trail this AM, just a few hundred yards west of Hilton Road. And, it is a real beauty too:
http://tinyurl.com/mx4b5ly

I did not take Tom's advice, and I parked at the Hilton Rd crossing .......tight, but doable.

The whole area is very birdy right now. Tanagers, RB Grosbeaks, flycatchers, turkeys, and several warblers along the trail and in the scrub along Hilton Rd to the north. Very easy walk both east and west from Hilton along the old railbed. Tick preventative measures are wise. Deer seen on the trail.

Bruce

--- In hmbirds@..., "Thomas Williams" <trwdsd@...> wrote:

This morning, while walking the section of the Albany County Rail Trail between Slingerlands and Voorheesville, I observed a singing male Hooded Warbler. It was foraging on the south side of the trail, in an area with multiple birch trees. I heard it first on the outbound leg, then heard it again 45 minutes later in about the same spot. After a few minutes of observation, I saw it fly up to an exposed branch, eating some kind of worm. I didn't see it carry any food away. I'll revisit the spot in a week or so, to see if there are any further signs of possible breeding.

It appears a single vehicle could be parked on the west side of Hilton Rd. at the guard rail, but I would not recommend it, pretty narrow roadway there. I hiked in from Upper Font Grove Rd., where parking is available. It's about a mile and a half from that point.

Tom Williams
Colonie


Black-billed Cuckoo

earthday49
 

Observed a Black-billed Cuckoo this morning near my home in Guilderland.


Alan Schroeder


Fire Triangle

curtmorgan@rocketmail.com
 


Rare bird alert: Lewis’ woodpecker spotted - AdirondackDailyEnterprise.com | News, Sports, Jobs, Saranac Lake region — Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Louis J. Suarato
 


Hooded Warbler, Slingerlands- 6/3

trwdsd
 

This morning, while walking the section of the Albany County Rail Trail between Slingerlands and Voorheesville, I observed a singing male Hooded Warbler. It was foraging on the south side of the trail, in an area with multiple birch trees. I heard it first on the outbound leg, then heard it again 45 minutes later in about the same spot. After a few minutes of observation, I saw it fly up to an exposed branch, eating some kind of worm. I didn't see it carry any food away. I'll revisit the spot in a week or so, to see if there are any further signs of possible breeding.

It appears a single vehicle could be parked on the west side of Hilton Rd. at the guard rail, but I would not recommend it, pretty narrow roadway there. I hiked in from Upper Font Grove Rd., where parking is available. It's about a mile and a half from that point.

Tom Williams
Colonie


Re: HMBC field trip summary, Schodack Island SP- 6/1

Deb
 

On June 2, I had a Cerulean Warbler drop down with a Black-and-white on the orange trail which was covered with cottonwood seeds, like a light snow had fallen. I'd never seen a Cerulean so close before. It's certainly worth a visit to Schodack Island.

Deb Ferguson
Delmar, NY

----- Reply message -----
From: "Thomas Williams" <trwdsd@...>
To: <hmbirds@...>
Subject: [HMBirds] HMBC field trip summary, Schodack Island SP- 6/1
Date: Sun, Jun 2, 2013 8:56 pm
Schodack Island State Park, just south of Casteleton-on-Hudson, was the destination for the June 1st bird walk of the Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club. Sixteen participants trekked about four miles, under sunny skies. It became very warm and humid later in the morning, but birds remained quite active throughout the trip. All the resident breeders had returned, and no migrant species were recorded.



The heron rookery along Schodack Creek continues. We saw many Great Blue Herons going back and forth during the morning. Multiple Eastern Wood-Pewees and Great Crested Flycatchers were heard. Among the vireos, Yellow-throated, Warbling, and Red-eyed were all present. Fish Crow is commonly heard at the park as well.



Blue-gray Gnatcatchers can be found on the trail along the river. Wood Thrush sang from the deeper woods, and Veery is commonplace, often foraging on the ground along the trails.



The warblers we detected included Ovenbird, Blue-winged, Black-and-white, American Redstart (abundant), Cerulean, and Chestnut-sided. At least four singing Ceruleans were observed. The group had the most success with them at the 1 1/2 mile marker along the yellow trail, just north of the wooden bridge by the fern swamp.



Other songbirds found in good numbers were Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and Baltimore Oriole. Some members of the field party heard a Yellow-billed Cuckoo; they seem to be reasonably common around the region this spring.



Thank you to all the attendees, especially to Eric Latini of Capital Region Audubon, our Cerulean "specialist", and to John K. who came all the way from Otsego County and was instrumental in getting the group good views of a foraging male Cerulean Warbler.



Tom Williams

Colonie


Sun Jun 8, Friends of the IBA event, Ft. Edward

Jory
 

The Friends of the IBA in Fort Edward is having a birding event on this coming Saturday. Attached is a copy of their press release.

The Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club will have a table there. Come visit.

Jory Langner
Delmar

=======================================

PRESS RELEASE: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Clifford Oliver, Director of Media & Public Relations
Phone: 518 692-9559 EMAIL: cmealy@...

Date: June 8, 2013
Times: "IBA Field Day": 8am - 1pm
"IBA Night Out" Artist Reception: 5 - 9pm
Location: Oliva Vineyards, Fort Edward, NY

FORT EDWARD Come see the "birds of the field" dressed in their finest plumage and help us celebrate the return of breeding songbirds to the Washington County Grasslands Important Bird Area, or IBA during Friends of the IBA's "IBA Field Day" on Saturday, June 8th! We'll share spotting scopes, binoculars and our knowledge of their behavior as we help you view and identify the birds from 8am - 1pm at Oliva Vineyards in Fort Edward.

A Live Bird of Prey presentation introduces you to the Short-eared Owl, American Kestrel and their role in the grasslands and NYS Spa Park land steward Adam Fehn offers tips on "Gardening for Birds with Native Plants." Sign up in advance for guided bird walks or a Bird Photography field workshop conducted by celebrated Fort Edward wildlife photographer Gordon Ellmers. Art and bird-related items for sale; food available for purchase. small fee for guided walks and photo workshop.

The Field Day officially launches Friends of the IBA's "Land for Owls" fundraising campaign to purchase critical lands in the IBA from willing sellers. One of our members has donated $1000 to kick off the campaign! She hopes her generosity will inspire others to contribute!

"Art for the IBA," Friends of the IBA's third annual juried art show, is a fundraiser to support our work to protect endangered and at risk birds while benefiting local communities. This year's show, co-sponsored by Glens Falls Friends of Photography, features a wide variety of art from some of the region's top artists and promises to be the best ever! Show runs June 1-30 at Oliva Vineyards.

Also on June 8, the public is invited to join us from 5-9pm for our "IBA Night Out" wine and cheese reception with the artists offering live music, great Art and scenic views of the Hudson River! Tickets on sale now through Oliva Vineyards or Friends of the IBA. For details and more information go to www.ibafriends.org or call 518-692-9559.

Friends of the IBA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness of and protection for state endangered Short-eared Owls and other threatened and at risk birds of the Washington County Grasslands Important Bird Area, or IBA.

ABOUT FRIENDS OF THE IBA
Friends of the Washington County Grasslands IBA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness of and protection for endangered Short-eared Owls and other threatened and at-risk birds of the Washington County Grasslands Important Bird Area, or IBA, and their habitat. This unique habitat is critical to the survival of endangered Short-eared Owls in New York State, where less than 100 of these amazing owls remain in the wild!

Friends of the Washington County Grasslands IBA, Inc.
PO Box 82 •Fort Edward •NY• 12828

12021 - 12040 of 28228