Date   

Upland Sandpiper - Ames, NY

naomiking
 


June 5 Birdline

philwhitney17
 

Birdline for May 31- June 5:

Best of the week:
COMMON LOON: Myosotis Lake 6/5 (2).
COMMON NIGHTHAWK: Colonie 5/31; Troy 5/31.
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO: Schodack Island 6/1.
BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO: Guilderland 6/5.
CLIFF SWALLOW: Ballston Spa 6/2.
CAPE MAY WARBLER: Washington County 5/31.
CERULEAN WARBLER: Schodack Island 6/1 (4), 6/2.
HOODED WARBLER: Slingerlands 6/3, 6/5.
VESPER SPARROW: Saratoga County Airport 6/1.
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW: Saratoga County Airport 6/1.

No new arrivals or transients were reported this week.

Thanks to Mona Bearor (Washington County), Susan Beaudoin (Ballston Spa), Bruce Dudek (Slingerlands), Deb Ferguson (Schodack Island), John Kent (Bethlehem), Alan Schroeder (Guilderland), Scott Stoner (Saratoga County Airport), Louis Suarato (Myosotis Lake), and Tom Williams (Schodack Island, Slingerlands).


Loons on Lake Myositis

Louis J. Suarato
 

If you'd like to observe the interactions between an adult and juvenile Loon, I encourage you to visit Lake Myosotis. Today they were near the shore by the canoe storage. I posted a couple of photos on the club's Yahoo site.

Louis Suarato


Re: Hooded Warbler, Slingerlands- 6/3

bdudek34
 

I was able to find Tom's Hooded Warbler on the Rail Trail this AM, just a few hundred yards west of Hilton Road. And, it is a real beauty too:
http://tinyurl.com/mx4b5ly

I did not take Tom's advice, and I parked at the Hilton Rd crossing .......tight, but doable.

The whole area is very birdy right now. Tanagers, RB Grosbeaks, flycatchers, turkeys, and several warblers along the trail and in the scrub along Hilton Rd to the north. Very easy walk both east and west from Hilton along the old railbed. Tick preventative measures are wise. Deer seen on the trail.

Bruce

--- In hmbirds@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Williams" <trwdsd@...> wrote:

This morning, while walking the section of the Albany County Rail Trail between Slingerlands and Voorheesville, I observed a singing male Hooded Warbler. It was foraging on the south side of the trail, in an area with multiple birch trees. I heard it first on the outbound leg, then heard it again 45 minutes later in about the same spot. After a few minutes of observation, I saw it fly up to an exposed branch, eating some kind of worm. I didn't see it carry any food away. I'll revisit the spot in a week or so, to see if there are any further signs of possible breeding.

It appears a single vehicle could be parked on the west side of Hilton Rd. at the guard rail, but I would not recommend it, pretty narrow roadway there. I hiked in from Upper Font Grove Rd., where parking is available. It's about a mile and a half from that point.

Tom Williams
Colonie


Black-billed Cuckoo

earthday49
 

Observed a Black-billed Cuckoo this morning near my home in Guilderland.


Alan Schroeder


Fire Triangle

curtmorgan@rocketmail.com
 


Rare bird alert: Lewis’ woodpecker spotted - AdirondackDailyEnterprise.com | News, Sports, Jobs, Saranac Lake region — Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Louis J. Suarato
 


Hooded Warbler, Slingerlands- 6/3

trwdsd
 

This morning, while walking the section of the Albany County Rail Trail between Slingerlands and Voorheesville, I observed a singing male Hooded Warbler. It was foraging on the south side of the trail, in an area with multiple birch trees. I heard it first on the outbound leg, then heard it again 45 minutes later in about the same spot. After a few minutes of observation, I saw it fly up to an exposed branch, eating some kind of worm. I didn't see it carry any food away. I'll revisit the spot in a week or so, to see if there are any further signs of possible breeding.

It appears a single vehicle could be parked on the west side of Hilton Rd. at the guard rail, but I would not recommend it, pretty narrow roadway there. I hiked in from Upper Font Grove Rd., where parking is available. It's about a mile and a half from that point.

Tom Williams
Colonie


Re: HMBC field trip summary, Schodack Island SP- 6/1

Deb
 

On June 2, I had a Cerulean Warbler drop down with a Black-and-white on the orange trail which was covered with cottonwood seeds, like a light snow had fallen. I'd never seen a Cerulean so close before. It's certainly worth a visit to Schodack Island.

Deb Ferguson
Delmar, NY

----- Reply message -----
From: "Thomas Williams" <trwdsd@yahoo.com>
To: <hmbirds@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [HMBirds] HMBC field trip summary, Schodack Island SP- 6/1
Date: Sun, Jun 2, 2013 8:56 pm
Schodack Island State Park, just south of Casteleton-on-Hudson, was the destination for the June 1st bird walk of the Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club. Sixteen participants trekked about four miles, under sunny skies. It became very warm and humid later in the morning, but birds remained quite active throughout the trip. All the resident breeders had returned, and no migrant species were recorded.



The heron rookery along Schodack Creek continues. We saw many Great Blue Herons going back and forth during the morning. Multiple Eastern Wood-Pewees and Great Crested Flycatchers were heard. Among the vireos, Yellow-throated, Warbling, and Red-eyed were all present. Fish Crow is commonly heard at the park as well.



Blue-gray Gnatcatchers can be found on the trail along the river. Wood Thrush sang from the deeper woods, and Veery is commonplace, often foraging on the ground along the trails.



The warblers we detected included Ovenbird, Blue-winged, Black-and-white, American Redstart (abundant), Cerulean, and Chestnut-sided. At least four singing Ceruleans were observed. The group had the most success with them at the 1 1/2 mile marker along the yellow trail, just north of the wooden bridge by the fern swamp.



Other songbirds found in good numbers were Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and Baltimore Oriole. Some members of the field party heard a Yellow-billed Cuckoo; they seem to be reasonably common around the region this spring.



Thank you to all the attendees, especially to Eric Latini of Capital Region Audubon, our Cerulean "specialist", and to John K. who came all the way from Otsego County and was instrumental in getting the group good views of a foraging male Cerulean Warbler.



Tom Williams

Colonie


Sun Jun 8, Friends of the IBA event, Ft. Edward

Jory
 

The Friends of the IBA in Fort Edward is having a birding event on this coming Saturday. Attached is a copy of their press release.

The Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club will have a table there. Come visit.

Jory Langner
Delmar

=======================================

PRESS RELEASE: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Clifford Oliver, Director of Media & Public Relations
Phone: 518 692-9559 EMAIL: cmealy@nycap.rr.com

Date: June 8, 2013
Times: "IBA Field Day": 8am - 1pm
"IBA Night Out" Artist Reception: 5 - 9pm
Location: Oliva Vineyards, Fort Edward, NY

FORT EDWARD Come see the "birds of the field" dressed in their finest plumage and help us celebrate the return of breeding songbirds to the Washington County Grasslands Important Bird Area, or IBA during Friends of the IBA's "IBA Field Day" on Saturday, June 8th! We'll share spotting scopes, binoculars and our knowledge of their behavior as we help you view and identify the birds from 8am - 1pm at Oliva Vineyards in Fort Edward.

A Live Bird of Prey presentation introduces you to the Short-eared Owl, American Kestrel and their role in the grasslands and NYS Spa Park land steward Adam Fehn offers tips on "Gardening for Birds with Native Plants." Sign up in advance for guided bird walks or a Bird Photography field workshop conducted by celebrated Fort Edward wildlife photographer Gordon Ellmers. Art and bird-related items for sale; food available for purchase. small fee for guided walks and photo workshop.

The Field Day officially launches Friends of the IBA's "Land for Owls" fundraising campaign to purchase critical lands in the IBA from willing sellers. One of our members has donated $1000 to kick off the campaign! She hopes her generosity will inspire others to contribute!

"Art for the IBA," Friends of the IBA's third annual juried art show, is a fundraiser to support our work to protect endangered and at risk birds while benefiting local communities. This year's show, co-sponsored by Glens Falls Friends of Photography, features a wide variety of art from some of the region's top artists and promises to be the best ever! Show runs June 1-30 at Oliva Vineyards.

Also on June 8, the public is invited to join us from 5-9pm for our "IBA Night Out" wine and cheese reception with the artists offering live music, great Art and scenic views of the Hudson River! Tickets on sale now through Oliva Vineyards or Friends of the IBA. For details and more information go to www.ibafriends.org or call 518-692-9559.

Friends of the IBA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness of and protection for state endangered Short-eared Owls and other threatened and at risk birds of the Washington County Grasslands Important Bird Area, or IBA.

ABOUT FRIENDS OF THE IBA
Friends of the Washington County Grasslands IBA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness of and protection for endangered Short-eared Owls and other threatened and at-risk birds of the Washington County Grasslands Important Bird Area, or IBA, and their habitat. This unique habitat is critical to the survival of endangered Short-eared Owls in New York State, where less than 100 of these amazing owls remain in the wild!

Friends of the Washington County Grasslands IBA, Inc.
PO Box 82 •Fort Edward •NY• 12828


Cliff Swallow Sighting and Question

Susan
 

Saw Cliff Swallows building nests on the side of the Saratoga County Sheriff's Dept building in Ballston Spa today. When I had looked for them earlier in the spring it had appeared that the previous years nests had been knocked down and I was concerned that they wouldn't return. I know it's illegal to harm native birds, but does anyone know if it's illegal to remove their nests. I'd certainly want to have my facts straight before confronting the police.
Susan Beaudoin
Stillwater


extralimital report: HMBC field trip summary, Doodletown, Rockland County- 6/2

trwdsd
 

The Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club conducted its now-annual expedition to Doodletown, near Bear Mountain State Park in Rockland County, on Sunday. We arrived a bit later than scheduled, and found that parking was at a premium. The New York State Young Birders Club (http://www.nysyoungbirders.org) also ran a large trip today. It was wonderful to see the enthusiam and keen interest shown by the group when we encountered them along the road.

Our late arrival was due to a quick stop at the Great Vly near Saugerties, where a KING RAIL has been observed for about a week. As we pulled the cars to a stop at the roadside, the rail was crossing the road from one portion of the marsh to the other. This is a large bird, with a loud, emphatic call, which entertained us from just inside the reeds for twenty minutes.

At Doodletown, we saw both Turkey and Black Vultures, the latter seemingly just as common in that area. Two Yellow-billed Cuckoos were heard, one offering brief views in flight. Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are fairly easy to spot going up the trail, on long-obsolete telephone wires or leafless branches.

Once migration has sudsided, Doodletown has a standard set of breeding species, but a few occur in high numbers and/or are highly desired by birders farther north where their presence is uncommon. We recorded six Cerulean Warblers, seven Hooded Warblers, and two Worm-eating Warblers. A Kentucky Warbler had been reported by others this spring, but we were unable to find it.

Other birds of note were both species of waterthrush, Yellow-throated Vireo, Scarlet Tanager, and Indigo Bunting. Non-avian encounters included several Luna Moths, one Timber Rattlesnake (NYSYBC), and zero bears.

Thank you to all of the participants for a very successful outing.


Tom Williams
Colonie


Problem with website

donna
 

I have not been able to get any current updates to the website. The last posting i can see on the yahoo message board is 5/27. On the bird club page it's earlier than that. Is anyone else having a problem? Any suggestions how to fix it? Has anyone seen Indigo Buntings recently?

As always, thank you for any info you can pass along.

Donna Wright


HMBC field trip summary, Schodack Island SP- 6/1

trwdsd
 

Schodack Island State Park, just south of Casteleton-on-Hudson, was the destination for the June 1st bird walk of the Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club. Sixteen participants trekked about four miles, under sunny skies. It became very warm and humid later in the morning, but birds remained quite active throughout the trip. All the resident breeders had returned, and no migrant species were recorded.

The heron rookery along Schodack Creek continues. We saw many Great Blue Herons going back and forth during the morning. Multiple Eastern Wood-Pewees and Great Crested Flycatchers were heard. Among the vireos, Yellow-throated, Warbling, and Red-eyed were all present. Fish Crow is commonly heard at the park as well.

Blue-gray Gnatcatchers can be found on the trail along the river. Wood Thrush sang from the deeper woods, and Veery is commonplace, often foraging on the ground along the trails.

The warblers we detected included Ovenbird, Blue-winged, Black-and-white, American Redstart (abundant), Cerulean, and Chestnut-sided. At least four singing Ceruleans were observed. The group had the most success with them at the 1 1/2 mile marker along the yellow trail, just north of the wooden bridge by the fern swamp.

Other songbirds found in good numbers were Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and Baltimore Oriole. Some members of the field party heard a Yellow-billed Cuckoo; they seem to be reasonably common around the region this spring.

Thank you to all the attendees, especially to Eric Latini of Capital Region Audubon, our Cerulean "specialist", and to John K. who came all the way from Otsego County and was instrumental in getting the group good views of a foraging male Cerulean Warbler.


Tom Williams
Colonie


Re: Mystery Bird Song

David Martin <david@...>
 

Carolina Wren's teakettle song.

David Martin
Slingerlands, New York
http://naturebits.org

On 6/2/2013 1:40 PM, Alan French wrote:
Hi Folks,

Our son sent us an audio file and asked what bird is singing. My ears
don't do well with high frequencies, so I can barely hear it.

I've placed the file in the "Files" section as "Mystery Bird Song."

On listening again, although it is hard to make out the song, I'm
guessing Common Yellowthroat.

Thanks, and clear skies, Alan



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





Mystery Bird Song

Alan
 

Hi Folks,

Our son sent us an audio file and asked what bird is singing. My ears don't do well with high frequencies, so I can barely hear it.

I've placed the file in the "Files" section as "Mystery Bird Song."

On listening again, although it is hard to make out the song, I'm guessing Common Yellowthroat.

Thanks, and clear skies, Alan


Saratoga County Airport and Saratoga Battlefield June 1

scottjstoner
 

This morning at the Saratoga County Airport (with John Kent and Tristan Lowery) birds included several grasshopper sparrows, vesper sparrow, horned lark, eastern meadowlark and a broad-winged hawk.


I continued on to the battlefield where I had


bobolink
field sparrow
rose-breasted grosbeak
yellow-bellied sapsuckers (very active at tour road stop 1)
indigo buntings
eastern wood pewee
ovenbird
blue-winged warbler
veery.


The beaver activity just before tour stop 1 has created a large swamp, with a u-shaped beaver dam and large beaver lodge.


Scott Stoner, Loudonville


Veery vocals

Ellen
 

Had a vocal Veery entertaining us the last two evenings. Finally got a look
at him last night, when he provided a full range of vocalizations (e.g.,
songs, call notes).

Ellen P.
West Charlton


Ducks & Geese

jw.kent@...
 

This morning at Bethlehem's Henry Hudson Park, I noticed several Hooded Mergansers flying into and out of the cottonwood trees along the river. I am guessing that means they are breeding here, which is news to me.

Several flocks of northbound Canada Geese, totaling a few hundred, have passed by, presumably in molt migration. They are flying fairly low.

John Kent
Selkirk


eBird Report - Old Route 4, May 31, 2013

ConserveBirds
 

-Mona Bearor
S Glens Falls


Old Route 4, Washington, US-NY
May 31, 2013 6:50 AM - 9:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Drove road 2mi to dead end with frequent stops; walked trail at road end for about 500 yds
31 species

Canada Goose 10
Wood Duck 1
Mallard 11
Green Heron 1
Turkey Vulture 1
Mourning Dove 2
Downy Woodpecker 1
Alder Flycatcher 1
Willow Flycatcher 2
Least Flycatcher 1
Eastern Kingbird 1
Warbling Vireo 3
Red-eyed Vireo 3
Common Raven 2
Tree Swallow 1
Black-capped Chickadee 1
Veery 1
Gray Catbird 5
European Starling 2
Common Yellowthroat 5
American Redstart 3
Cape May Warbler 1 heard only
Yellow Warbler 3
Song Sparrow 2
Swamp Sparrow 1
Scarlet Tanager 1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
Red-winged Blackbird 14
Common Grackle 15
Baltimore Oriole 2
American Goldfinch 1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S14301510

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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