Date   

Re: Common Nighthawk, Colonie- 5/27

Will Raup
 

Had a single Common Nighthawk in Albany this evening as well, around 9pm as we were out admiring the sudden (and numerous) return of Bats.

Will Raup
Albany, NY


________________________________

To: hmbirds@yahoogroups.com
From: trwdsd@yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 28 May 2013 01:06:03 +0000
Subject: [HMBirds] Common Nighthawk, Colonie- 5/27



While sitting out this evening in hopes of spotting some flyover Brant,
I was surprised by a single Common Nighthawk that vocalized a few times
as it flew by at low altitude around 7:45PM. No Brant were detected
through 9:00PM.

Tom Williams
Colonie



Common Nighthawk, Colonie- 5/27

trwdsd
 

While sitting out this evening in hopes of spotting some flyover Brant, I was surprised by a single Common Nighthawk that vocalized a few times as it flew by at low altitude around 7:45PM. No Brant were detected through 9:00PM.

Tom Williams
Colonie


Vischer Ferry

jhershey2
 

I checked the Water Authority road this evening at Vischer Ferry Preserve starting at the entrance, looking for the BB Cuckoo reported earlier. I didn't find any at the entrance but heard a cuckoo, most likely, Yellow-billed just past the bridge toward the river. I also walked the 3-mile western loop this morning. The usual breeding birds are all vocalizing but the only migrant I heard was a Blackpoll Warbler (like the other reports). Their song notes are about as loud as a pin dropping. In general, the water levels are pretty high right now in the marsh areas. I'm still hoping to hear a bittern. On the scout trail through the woods from the back area to the towpath, I found a bunch of feathers but no trace of any other remains. I've posted a pic of the feathers which I think belonged to a Wild Turkey, based on a quick look in my field guide. The longest one was about 15 inches. This would be a pretty big meal for one bird. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hmbirds/photos/album/77752785/pic/1952347457/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=401&dir=asc

John H.


Austerlitz- American Woodcock, Ruffed Grouse

kernscot
 

Nancy Kern

To: kernscot@hotmail.com
Picture of do-not-reply@ebird.org

Austerlitz, Columbia, US-NY
May 27, 2013 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
4.0 mile(s)
Comments: Sunny, temp. about 60 F, 0-10mph wind, nice day.
64 species

Canada Goose 4
Wood Duck 2
Ruffed Grouse 1
Wild Turkey 2
Great Blue Heron 1
Turkey Vulture 1
Broad-winged Hawk 2 Have a probable nest about 300 ft. west of my house. Can't find the exact location, but have had two birds calling for weeks. One sits in a pine tree in the yard and flies back to the same area.
Red-tailed Hawk 2
Killdeer 1
American Woodcock 1
Rock Pigeon 2
Mourning Dove 4
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 4
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
Downy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 1
American Kestrel 2
Eastern Wood-Pewee 1
Willow Flycatcher 1
Least Flycatcher 1
Eastern Phoebe 4
Great Crested Flycatcher 1
Eastern Kingbird 1 We are seeing fewer E. Kingbirds in our area than previous years.
Warbling Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 1
Blue Jay 1
American Crow 3
Common Raven 1
Tree Swallow 2
Barn Swallow 2
Black-capped Chickadee 1
Tufted Titmouse 1
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
House Wren 1
Eastern Bluebird 1
Veery 2
Swainson's Thrush 1
Wood Thrush 1
American Robin 5
Gray Catbird 3
Northern Mockingbird 1
European Starling 2
Ovenbird 1
Blue-winged Warbler 1
Common Yellowthroat 2
American Redstart 1
Cape May Warbler 1
Yellow Warbler 2
Chestnut-sided Warbler 3
Eastern Towhee 4
Chipping Sparrow 2
Field Sparrow 1
Song Sparrow 1
Northern Cardinal 2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
Bobolink 6
Red-winged Blackbird 8
Eastern Meadowlark 1
Brown-headed Cowbird 1
Baltimore Oriole 1
American Goldfinch 5
House Sparrow 6

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S14263114

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


Re: Yellow-billed & Black-billed Cuckoos, Elks Trail- 5/27

trwdsd
 

My description of the location of the YB Cuckoos was confusing, here is a better attempt. There are three baseball fields at Veterans Memorial Park, which is located along Elk's Trail off of MacElroy Rd. in Clifton Park. The cuckoos were seen and heard in the treeline behind the outfield fence of the western-most baseball field, or along the north side of the property that has a wetland behind it.

In addition, we believed that we heard a third YB Cuckoo in the middle of the trail system that is located to the south of the pavilion parking area across from the "first" baseball field. Sorry for the confusion.

TW

--- In hmbirds@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Williams" <trwdsd@...> wrote:

At least two, and a third probable, Yellow-billed Cuckoos at Elks Trail in Clifton Park, off of MacElroy Rd. Also heard a Black-billed Cuckoo as well. Birds are in tree line beyond the outfield fence of the baseball field nearest to the flagpoles, primarily from centerfield to rightfield line.

A walk along the trails past the pavilion parking area produced multiple Alder Flycatchers, Blue-winged Warbler, RB Grosbeak, and a gray fox among others. Very birdy this morning from 9-11AM.

Tom Williams
Colonie


Flycatchers and more

Ellen
 

I just heard my FOS Eastern Wood-pewee and Great Crested Flycatcher while
walking by a neighbor's farm a little awhile ago. Adding to the chorus were
Baltimore Oriole, Warbling Vireo, Red-Eyed Vireo, and House Wren.

Meanwhile, at least one of the phoebe eggs in the nest by our back door has
hatched. I could hear the little hatchling begging yesterday. :)

Ellen P.
West Charlton


Re: Mourning Warbler - Rensselaer County

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

There were multiple Alder Flycatchers singing along Normanskill Drive in
Albany this morning. Also present at Normanskill Farm were Least and
Willow Flycatchers, Eastern Wood Pewees, phoebes, an Eastern Kingbird, both
orioles, all three mimids, bobolinks, a single singing Indigo Bunting, and
at least one eastern meadowlark, and a red-tailed hawk. Warbler diversity
was low, but there was a blackpoll singing along the drive early in the
morning.

Good birding,

ZSW


On Mon, May 27, 2013 at 1:00 PM, jw.kent <jw.kent@yahoo.com> wrote:

**


This morning Tristan Lowery and I hiked the Taconic Crest Trail from
Petersburg Pass in Rensselaer County north to the Snow Hole. About 2 miles
north of Petersburg Pass there is an area along the trail that was cleared
sometime in the last year, leaving scattered trees and bushes along with
piles of cut brush. This area is in the Hopkins Memorial Forest, which is
managed by the Williams College Center for Environmental Studies. I am
guessing that the clearing may have been done to provide habitat for
Mourning Warbler - if so, it worked. There was one that appeared to be on
territory, singing from an exposed perch in one of the piles of cut brush.
Otherwise, we encountered the usual high-elevation breeders along the
trail. Black-throated Blue and Black-throated Green Warblers were common in
the woods, along with Red-eyed and Blue-headed Vireos, Ovenbirds, American
Redstarts, and Black & White Warblers. In one area there were three Least
Flycatchers. A Ruffed Grouse was heard drumming off the trail. All of the
brushy areas were populated by Chestnut-sided Warblers and Common
Yellowthroats. At the Snow Hole, a Winter Wren was singing, as it has been
every time I have been there at this time of year. A single Blackpoll
Warbler was heard singing along the trail, presumably a migrant. We also
heard Veery, Hermit Thrush, Scarlet Tanager, and a drumming Yellow-bellied
Sapsucker. And if you're wondering, yes, there was snow in the Snow Hole.

On the way back we made a brief stop at the portion of Grafton Lakes State
Park south of Route 2, where the blueberry bushes are. We hoped to find
Alder Flycatcher, but didn't hear any flycatchers. We did hear
White-throated Sparrow, which I believe breeds there, and Chestnut-sided
Warbler.

John Kent
Selkirk




--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Mourning Warbler - Rensselaer County

jw.kent <jw.kent@...>
 

This morning Tristan Lowery and I hiked the Taconic Crest Trail from Petersburg Pass in Rensselaer County north to the Snow Hole. About 2 miles north of Petersburg Pass there is an area along the trail that was cleared sometime in the last year, leaving scattered trees and bushes along with piles of cut brush. This area is in the Hopkins Memorial Forest, which is managed by the Williams College Center for Environmental Studies. I am guessing that the clearing may have been done to provide habitat for Mourning Warbler - if so, it worked. There was one that appeared to be on territory, singing from an exposed perch in one of the piles of cut brush. Otherwise, we encountered the usual high-elevation breeders along the trail. Black-throated Blue and Black-throated Green Warblers were common in the woods, along with Red-eyed and Blue-headed Vireos, Ovenbirds, American Redstarts, and Black & White Warblers. In one area there were three Least Flycatchers. A Ruffed Grouse was heard drumming off the trail. All of the brushy areas were populated by Chestnut-sided Warblers and Common Yellowthroats. At the Snow Hole, a Winter Wren was singing, as it has been every time I have been there at this time of year. A single Blackpoll Warbler was heard singing along the trail, presumably a migrant. We also heard Veery, Hermit Thrush, Scarlet Tanager, and a drumming Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. And if you're wondering, yes, there was snow in the Snow Hole.

On the way back we made a brief stop at the portion of Grafton Lakes State Park south of Route 2, where the blueberry bushes are. We hoped to find Alder Flycatcher, but didn't hear any flycatchers. We did hear White-throated Sparrow, which I believe breeds there, and Chestnut-sided Warbler.

John Kent
Selkirk


Bald Eagle (imm.) and Black-billed Cuckuo at VFNHP today...

Neil Manning
 

Bald Eagle and Black-billed Cuckuo were the highlights at VFNHP (CPWA entrance) today. in addition, many RB Grosbeaks, Veeries and Wood Thrushes. Also; Eastern Kingbirds and GC Flycatchers. The best Warbler I could manage was an Am. Redstart that I 'pished' up.

-Neil


Yellow-billed & Black-billed Cuckoos, Elks Trail- 5/27

trwdsd
 

At least two, and a third probable, Yellow-billed Cuckoos at Elks Trail in Clifton Park, off of MacElroy Rd. Also heard a Black-billed Cuckoo as well. Birds are in tree line beyond the outfield fence of the baseball field nearest to the flagpoles, primarily from centerfield to rightfield line.

A walk along the trails past the pavilion parking area produced multiple Alder Flycatchers, Blue-winged Warbler, RB Grosbeak, and a gray fox among others. Very birdy this morning from 9-11AM.

Tom Williams
Colonie


Out of Area: Arctic Tern - Pittsfield, MA 5/25/13

Will Raup
 

Thanks for the tip from Andy Guthrie!  Might be worth for folks to check places like the Tomhannock, Saratoga Lake etc. in the morning.

From MASS Birds:

Subject: Arctic and Black Terns Pontoosuc Lake,
Date: Sat May 25 2013 16:44 pm
From: miliff AT aol.com
 
In Pittsfield, Berkshire Co. One adult of each present now in rain and cold among 1000 swallows. Both terns stating near middle of lake.
Good Birding and check those lakes!

Will Raup
Albany, NY


Herons

Louis J. Suarato
 

I saw this Great Blue Heron at the Restifo Preserve on Thursday and returned today to see a Green Heron close to the road.

http://m.flickr.com/#/photos/lsuarato/8831708988/

Louis Suarato


Craig Thompson retiring from Five Rivers - potluck on June 6

scottjstoner
 

It is with very mixed feelings that I share the news that Craig Thompson will soon be retiring from DEC as Director of the Five Rivers Environmental Education Center in Delmar. Five Rivers has been the "home" of the Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club for several decades and we've been proud to associate with a series of great directors - first Bob Budliger, then Alan Mapes, and, for the past 18 years, Craig Thompson. Bob and Alan's reputation as top field birders preceded them, while Craig, always modest, proclaims himself an eternal beginner. Nothing can be further from the truth! In his 18 years as Director, Craig substantively and effectively welcomed the birding community to Five Rivers, and through his hundreds of bird walks, enthusiastic modesty, incredible speaking, leadership, and writing ability, has furthered the environmental literacy of the adults and young people of the Capital Region beyond measure. From eternally popular New Year's Day counts to December Owl prowls, Craig filled each year with activities that have made all of us better naturalists and better stewards of this earth. It is an honor to know him. - Scott Stoner


And, you are all welcome to celebrate his service at Five Rivers on June 6; details are below.

















The Friends of Five Rivers and the NYS DEC invite you to participate in a pot-luck dinner to celebrate Craig Thompson, Five Rivers Center Director's 35 years of service and 18 years as Center Director.

The pot-luck dinner will be held outside at the Five Rivers Environmental Education Center, 56 Game Farm Road, Delmar on June 6th from 5 pm to 7 pm.


Cape May Warblers - Vischer Ferry

jhershey2
 

This morning I walked the 3-mile western loop at Vischer Ferry Preserve. The biting insects are back which means that it's best not to stand too long in one place. Birding by ear is better. I was expecting to hear Blackpoll Warblers. I heard two different birds with high, thin song notes that I first thought were Blackpolls but they didn't have the crescendo in the middle. I'm lucky to be able to hear these high notes so I later went to the Cornell Lab website and listened to a lot of high, thin songs at the Macauley Library including Blackpoll, Cape May, Black-and-white, Bay-breasted Warbler, Golden-crowned Kinglet, and Brown Creeper. What I was hearing at VFP were definitely CAPE MAY WARBLERS, though I didn't see them. I think I need to add Cape May to my growing list of "uncommon birds that are more common than we think." Other than these there weren't very many migrant songbirds passing through this morning except the usual ones that have already set up territories.

John H.


City of Albany - 5/22 & 5/23

Tristan Lowery
 

A quick walk around Buckingham Pond this morning was quiet for the most
part, but I did find two Blackpoll Warblers and a Swainson's Thrush.
Notable summer residents included pairs of Red-eyed Vireo, Warbling Vireo,
and Baltimore Oriole.

I've had at least one Blackpoll Warbler in my backyard each of the last
three days. I have no way of knowing if it's the same bird, but yesterday
afternoon it was joined by an American Redstart, a Black-and-White Warbler,
a Swainson's Thrush, and a male Canada Warbler, which were all yard firsts.

Tristan Lowery
Albany


May 22 Birdline

philwhitney17
 

Birdline summary for week ending May 22, including highlights from five Century Runs on May 18 with total counts of 103 to 126 species.

Best of the week:
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER: Alcove Reservoir 5/18 (3).
AMERICAN BITTERN: Albany County 5/18; Lake Desolation Road 5/19; Kingsbury 5/20.
LEAST BITTERN: Black Creek Marsh 5/18.
GREAT EGRET: Niskayuna 5/20.
VIRGINIA RAIL: Glenville 5/18 (2); Niskayuna 5/18; Black Creek Marsh 5/16 (8-10), 5/18.
SORA: Livingston 5/17; Glenville 5/18; Niskayuna 5/18; Black Creek Marsh 5/18; Kingsbury 5/20.
COMMON GALLINULE: Coxsackie Grasslands 5/18; Black Creek Marsh 5/18.
BLACK TERN: Stanton Pond 5/18; Niskayuna 5/20.
COMMON NIGHTHAWK: Guilderland 5/21.
YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER: Albany 5/22.
CLIFF SWALLOW: Albany County 5/18; Alcove 5/18.
SWAINSON'S THRUSH: Featherstonhaugh SF 5/18; Thacher Park 5/18; Lake Desolation Road 5/19; Normanskill Farm 5/22; Albany 5/22.
TENNESSEE WARBLER: Clifton Park 5/16, Albany 5/17, 5/20; Mariaville 5/18.
CAPE MAY WARBLER: Albany 5/16, 5/17. 5/20.
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER: Albany 5/16; Schenectady 5/20; Normanskill Farm 5/22.
CERULEAN WARBLER: Schodack Island SP 5/18.
WORM-EATING WARBLER: Ushers Road SF 5/17; Deer Mountain 5/18.
HOODED WARBLER: Selkirk 5/17; Thacher Park 5/18; Albany 5/21.
WILSON'S WARBLER: Albany 5/17; Normanskill Farm 5/17; Five Rivers 5/18.
CANADA WARBLER: Albany County 5/18; Burnt Hills 5/19 (2); Lake Desolation Road 5/19 (4); Colonie 5/22; Albany 5/22 (2).
VESPER SPARROW: Saratoga Co. Airport 5/18; Knox 5/18.
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW: Glenville 5/18; Saratoga Co. Airport 5/18.
ORCHARD ORIOLE: Niskayuna 5/18 (2), 5/20 (3), 5/22; Normanskill Farm 5/18, 5/22; Kingsbury 5/20 (2).

Recent arrivals – and still some Siskins.
Black-billed Cuckoo: Meadowdale 5/16; Normanskill Farm 5/17; Saratoga Battlefield 5/18; Schodack Island SP 5/18; Albany County 5/18; Selkirk 5/21.
Eastern Wood-Pewee: Normanskill Farm 5/22; Albany 5/22.
Alder Flycatcher: Normanskill Farm 5/17. Five Rivers 5/18; Mariaville 5/18; Black Creek Marsh 5/18; Hadley 5/19; Kingsbury 5/20.
Willow Flycatcher: Normanskill Farm 5/17 (2), 5/22; Five Rivers 5/18; Black Creek Marsh 5/18.
Pine Siskin: Albany County 5/18; Kingsbury 5/20 (7).


Thanks to Larry Alden (Albany County, Meadowdale, Knox), Mona Bearor (Kingsbury), Susan Beaudoin (Saratoga Battlefield), David Harrison (Glenville, Niskayuna, Mariaville, Featherstonhaugh SF, Niskayuna, Schenectady), John Hershey (Clifton Park), John Kent (Selkirk, Bethlehem), Bill Lee (Black Creek Marsh, Niskayuna), Tristan Lowery (Albany, Black Creek Marsh, Schodack Island SP, Normanskill Farm), Alan Mapes (Five Rivers), Thomas McClenahan (Guilderland), Jeff Nadler (Burnt Hills, Lake Desolation), Will Raup (Albany, Coxsackie Grasslands, Deer Mtn., Alcove Reservoir, Stanton Pond), Bob Ricketts (Ushers Road SF), Alan Schroeder (Guilderland), Zach Schwartz-Weinstein (Albany), Tom Williams (Colonie, Normanskill Farm, Black Creek Marsh, Thacher Park, Alcove, Saratoga County Airport), and Will Yandik (Livingston).


Brant

Larry & Penny Alden
 

A flock of about 40 Brant was flying north over Indian Ladder Farms this evening at 8:45. I watched from my yard a little while later for about 20 minutes but did not see or hear any more Brant. An American Woodcock was flying around, though.

Larry Alden
Meadowdale
(on the border of southern Guilderland
and northern New Scotland)


Albany Migrants 5/22/13

Will Raup
 

After several days of virtually no migrants in my yard, last nights storms knocked quite a few down.  As expected there were a number of late migrants.

Starting just after 6am, was a number of Blackpoll Warblers singing.  With a little more patience heard the song of a Scarlet Tanager and Red-eyed Vireo.  

Checking the weedy edges of the yard, I quickly heard then saw at least 2 Canada Warblers.  A number of Eastern Wood-Pewee's were also singing.

There were a number of Empidonax Flycatchers moving through the yard, as I mentioned earlier I originally passed them off as Least Flycatchers.  However, one bird remained quite close to the ground in some overgrown shrubbery, its then that I heard the chu-wee call (sounding like a short Pewee song), but then I found the bird calling and it wasn't a Pewee.  A closer examination, showed a faint yellow wash on the bird's breast and belly as it called constantly, my first spring record of Yellow-bellied Flycatcher in my yard.  The bird was quite tame and I actually got a decent photo:

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/danikabelle/8784451285/" class="newlyinsertedlink">http&#58;&#47;&#47;www.flickr.com&#47;photos&#47;danikabelle&#47;8784451285&#47;</a>

Then a number of Swainson's Thrushes appeared, with several singing.  A female American Redstart (rare in my yard believe it or not, I have had more Cape May's than Redstarts) and Common Yellowthroat rounded out the warblers for the day.

Tonight doesn't look quite as promising unless some more storms fire up, but migration isn't done yet!

Good Birding!

Will Raup
Albany, NY


Normanskill Farm - 5/21

Tristan Lowery
 

I birded Normanskill Farm this morning, arriving just before 6:30, not too
long after the rain finally stopped. Normanskill Drive was buzzing with
birds as I walked down the slope; I heard both Wood and Swainson's Thrush
right away, a number of Eastern Wood-Pewees mewling in the background, and
a Scarlet Tanager high in canopy. Blackpoll Warblers were singing
everywhere - but seemed especially concentrated around a willow tree about
halfway down to the whipple-truss bridge. They had to pick the highest tree
along the road, but in its uppermost branches I also found two male
Blackburnian Warblers and a male BAY-BREASTED WARBLER. Yellow-rumped
Warblers and American Redstarts were present, as was a lone Cedar Waxwing,
my first sighting of this species in some time.

Down by the farm buildings I ran into Tom W. and after telling him about
the Bay-breasted, we headed back up the hill where, after much squinting
and neck craning, we were able to relocate the bird. Elsewhere on the farm
we found Chestnut-sided and Black-and-White Warbler (and of course Yellow
Warbler and Common Yellowthroat) but nothing like the mostly Blackpoll wave
we encountered earlier on. Other notable birds included a number of Least
and Willow Flycatchers, both orioles, and at least two singing Bobolinks.
The Eastern Meadowlark I've seen there every time for two weeks now was
nowhere to be found.

Afterwards, some careful scoping of Cohoes Flats turned up two Semipalmated
Plovers but no other migrating shorebirds.

Good birding!

Tristan Lowery
Albany


Tuesday's Normanskill Farm Oriole

Barbara Beebe
 

Pair of Cedar Waxwings chased by Male Baltimore Oriole

Great view of female oriole in nest-

Not able to disclose, but watch the orioles

Other highlights:

Great Blue Heron
Red-tail Hawks, pair soaring over garden area
Boblink-one
Goldfinches- too many to count
Yellow Warblers present by their songs

Thanks,
Barb Beebe
Delmar, NY

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