Date   

surprise visitor at my feeder/Saratoga Springs 3/13/13

emlo38 <marne-esq2@...>
 

Hello and happy spring!! I get to be home today because I get to have an expensive repair done to my car! Yay!

I was looking out my window at my feeders (noticing that I need to fill them) and a lone drab bird caught my attention. First thoughts female goldfinch? pine siskin? female house finch? None of the above; turns out it was a female yellow-rumped warbler. A hungry one. A yard first for me. Seems a touch early??? Still very nice to see.

Happy birding,

Marne


Red Winged Black Birds

heather.labore
 

This is my fist post to HMBC board! While waiting in line to pick up Girl Scout cookies this morning, there was at least 8 Red-winged Black Birds in the cornfield across from the Glenmont Wal-Mart. My first sighting of them this spring! Thank you HMBC for running this, and all the birders that post here. I enjoy it so much!


Tree Swallows

Will Raup
 

There is a big Flock of Tree Swallows Over the Hudson between Stockport station in Vosburg marsh.

To: HMBirds@yahoogroups.com
CC: linda_white@nps.gov; Brian_Mitchell@nps.gov
From: sfaccio@vtecostudies.org
Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2013 09:42:50 -0400
Subject: [HMBirds] Birders Needed for Surveys in Saratoga

Hello Birders,
As part of a regional breeding bird monitoring program, the Vermont
Center for Ecostudies (VCE), in collaboration with the National Park
Serviceís Inventory and Monitoring Program, is seeking volunteers to
help conduct point counts at 9 National Parks and Historic Sites across
the Northeast region, including *_Saratoga National Historical Park, in
Saratoga, NY_*.

At Saratoga NHP <http://www.nps.gov/sara/index.htm>, one forested study
site is in need of a volunteer observer in 2013.

*_Skills Required_:* Volunteer observers must possess excellent bird
identification skills (both visual and aural), and be capable of
identifying the majority of songbird species that breed in the park.
They must also be capable of hiking on variable terrain, often without
trails, and navigating with GPS and/or map and compass.

*_Time Commitment_:* The survey will take between 3 and 4 hours during
a single morning in June. This does not include travel time to and from
the park. Surveys are to be conducted during the early morning hours
(e.g. arrive at the first point at approximately 5:30 AM). In addition,
another 1-1.5 hours of time is required to transfer data from field
forms onto data sheets, and to enter data into an online, web-based data
entry system before August 1st. Because this is a long-term monitoring
program, we are most interested in participants who can make a
multi-year commitment to the project.

*_Rewards for Volunteering:_* Participants enjoy numerous intangible
rewards (such as seeing the sunrise and enjoying a morning of birding
before the park is "officially" open, and knowing they have contributed
valuable data for the benefit of bird populations).

For more information about the project, visit the NPS Northeast
Temperate Network
<http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/units/netn/monitor/programs/breedingLandbird/breedingLandbird.cfm>
website, where you can download project protocols, annual reports and more.
<http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/units/NETN/monitor/birds/birds.cfm>
For questions or to participate, contact sfaccio@vtecostudies.org
(please do not send inquires to this listserv).

Steve Faccio
Conservation Biologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
20 Palmer CT
White River Junction, VT 05001
/_Mailing address:
_/P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 xt.3
sfaccio@vtecostudies.org <mailto:sfaccio%40vtecostudies.org>
www.vtecostudies.org
<http://www.vtecostudies.org/>


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Birders Needed for Surveys in Saratoga

Steve Faccio
 

Hello Birders,
As part of a regional breeding bird monitoring program, the Vermont
Center for Ecostudies (VCE), in collaboration with the National Park
Serviceís Inventory and Monitoring Program, is seeking volunteers to
help conduct point counts at 9 National Parks and Historic Sites across
the Northeast region, including *_Saratoga National Historical Park, in
Saratoga, NY_*.

At Saratoga NHP <http://www.nps.gov/sara/index.htm>, one forested study
site is in need of a volunteer observer in 2013.

*_Skills Required_:* Volunteer observers must possess excellent bird
identification skills (both visual and aural), and be capable of
identifying the majority of songbird species that breed in the park.
They must also be capable of hiking on variable terrain, often without
trails, and navigating with GPS and/or map and compass.

*_Time Commitment_:* The survey will take between 3 and 4 hours during
a single morning in June. This does not include travel time to and from
the park. Surveys are to be conducted during the early morning hours
(e.g. arrive at the first point at approximately 5:30 AM). In addition,
another 1-1.5 hours of time is required to transfer data from field
forms onto data sheets, and to enter data into an online, web-based data
entry system before August 1st. Because this is a long-term monitoring
program, we are most interested in participants who can make a
multi-year commitment to the project.

*_Rewards for Volunteering:_* Participants enjoy numerous intangible
rewards (such as seeing the sunrise and enjoying a morning of birding
before the park is "officially" open, and knowing they have contributed
valuable data for the benefit of bird populations).

For more information about the project, visit the NPS Northeast
Temperate Network
<http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/units/netn/monitor/programs/breedingLandbird/breedingLandbird.cfm>
website, where you can download project protocols, annual reports and more.
<http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/units/NETN/monitor/birds/birds.cfm>
For questions or to participate, contact sfaccio@vtecostudies.org
(please do not send inquires to this listserv).

Steve Faccio
Conservation Biologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
20 Palmer CT
White River Junction, VT 05001
/_Mailing address:
_/P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 xt.3
sfaccio@vtecostudies.org <mailto:sfaccio%40vtecostudies.org>
www.vtecostudies.org
<http://www.vtecostudies.org/>


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


UAlbany Campus - 3/12

Tristan Lowery
 

This afternoon's rain may have kept the lacrosse team off the campus
athletic fields, but not me and half a dozen Killdeers. Also enjoying some
respite from the usual gladiatorial goings-on here were a pair of Eastern
Bluebirds sitting atop a chain-link fence behind the bleachers. Nearby at
the Wetland Mitigation Project (the "Indian Pond") were 24 Canada Geese
making a migratory pit-stop on the pond, all of which were of one of the
decidely smaller races. Common Grackles and Red-winged Blackbirds were
undeterred by the rain, and the Dark-Eyed Juncos and Northern Cardinals
were singing, the former for the first time I've heard this year.

Good birding.

Tristan Lowery
Albany


Hooded Mergansers at 6 Mile Waterworks

Cath N
 

At 2pm this afternoon I stopped in at Rensselaer Lake, 6 Mile Waterworks. Saw 5 Hooded Mergansers (2 male), a pair of Common Mergansers, one Canada Goose, and 9 Common Grackles. Did not see or hear any Red-Winged Blackbirds with the grackles (although the roar from the interstates made it hard to distinguish anything).

Catherine Klatt


Redpoll, pale not Hoary

Naomi Lloyd
 

Among the 50-odd Common Redpolls at the feeders today, one stood out. She was obviously not a Hoary but she had a lot of white feathering on her back. Now that I'm aware of them I notice a lot of partially-leucistic birds.

Naomi Lloyd
West Sand Lake

http://kestrelhill.wordpress.com/


New birds in Charlton/Galway

Kurt <kurt.weiskotten@...>
 

Several A. Woodcocks peenting and dancing last night in the back swamp, and a Great Horned Owl hooting in the white pines. A good 5 inches of snow still in the woods with open hummocks and wet spots for the woodcocks. At least 5 Song Sparrows mixed in with the A. Tree Sparrows this morning - they must have pushed north yesterday/last night. A flyover silent Killdeer rounds out the new arrivals.

Kurt


Collins Lake- N. Shoveler, Am. Wigeon, Gadwall, GW Teal- 3/12

trwdsd
 

At Collins Lake in Scotia this morning, the water is mostly open and there is a great variety of ducks present. One drake Northern Shoveler, a pair of Gadwall, eight American Wigeon, nine Green-winged Teal, 34 Ring-necked Duck, twelve Common Mergansers. More ducks are flying in now at 9:00AM.

Tom Williams
Colonie


Re: Hooded Mergansers, Song Sparrows and American Robins- 3/11

Louis J. Suarato
 

Thanks for the heads up on the hooded mergansers at Five Rivers!
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hmbirds/photos/recent/1215192063/view



From: hmbirds@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hmbirds@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Thomas Williams
Sent: Monday, March 11, 2013 1:53 PM
To: hmbirds@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [HMBirds] Hooded Mergansers, Song Sparrows and American Robins-
3/11





This morning I counted 8 Hooded Mergansers on the partially frozen Beaver
Pond at Five Rivers in Delmar, and a lone male Hoodie at Six-Mile Waterworks
in Albany. Yesterday there were a pair of them in the wetlands at Ferry Rd.
in Niskayuna.

A belted Kingfisher is back at the Beaver Pond at Five Fivers. There was a
group of at least five Song Sparrows along the brushy edge next to the Jones
Barn, they are apparently new arrivals. Plenty of Canada Geese continued to
move north, too.

At home in Colonie there were two Song Sparrows under the feeders just after
noon, also new arrivals. Red-winged Blackbird and Common Grackle numbers are
slowly increasing. Four American Robins appeared on the grassy front yard
for the first time this year as well.

Tom Williams
Colonie


Birds correct, road name off

rlharrow@...
 

Slight correction. Meant Riverview Road in sight of Twin Bridges. Have spent a lot of time on river road, so miss wrote.
Ron harrower
Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T


Pintail and Glaucous Gull

rlharrow@...
 

Stopped by area of water by River Road, just before it goes over Northway. Gulls were standing on long strip of ice in middle. Had excellent look at a Glaucous Gull. Checked large group of ducks on near side of ice strip and found almost all to be Mallards. There was 1 male Pintail tipping down to feed. It's good to see new ducks

Ron Harrower
Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T


Re: 1st year Bald Eagle from Quebec or Massachusetts

curtmorgan@rocketmail.com
 

--- In hmbirds@yahoogroups.com, "curtmorgan@..." <pcmjr@...> wrote:

While checking on the nests of some local Bald Eagles I saw a first year BE fly in near one of the nests in northern Albany County. I expected that this was a bird from that nest last year, but when I looked carefully at my photos I realized that it had an orange band, which is characteristic of those bands in either Quebec or Massachusetts. Since the shots were handheld I was unable to read the code.


Hooded Mergansers, Song Sparrows and American Robins- 3/11

trwdsd
 

This morning I counted 8 Hooded Mergansers on the partially frozen Beaver Pond at Five Rivers in Delmar, and a lone male Hoodie at Six-Mile Waterworks in Albany. Yesterday there were a pair of them in the wetlands at Ferry Rd. in Niskayuna.

A belted Kingfisher is back at the Beaver Pond at Five Fivers. There was a group of at least five Song Sparrows along the brushy edge next to the Jones Barn, they are apparently new arrivals. Plenty of Canada Geese continued to move north, too.

At home in Colonie there were two Song Sparrows under the feeders just after noon, also new arrivals. Red-winged Blackbird and Common Grackle numbers are slowly increasing. Four American Robins appeared on the grassy front yard for the first time this year as well.


Tom Williams
Colonie


Rare Goose Season!

Will Raup
 

Hello all!

Many of you have reported large numbers of Geese starting to head north, even myself this morning had a couple of good sized Canada Goose flocks pass overhead while I waited with my kids for the bus.

The middle of March is prime time for rare Geese.  Cackling, Ross's, Greater White-fronted, Barnacle have all been found in the area over the next couple of weeks.  A few Pink Footed Geese have been in New Jersey this winter and into Orange County, NY.  The most numerous reports historically have come from the Hudson River between Stillwater and Ft. Miller, but any large group of Geese has potential to have these other geese with them, so be sure to take a bit of extra time and scan those flocks!

I'll also ask that people try and photograph any and all potential Cackling Geese.  A probable Cackling Goose was photographed this weekend in Greene County,so they are passing through!  I'm trying to get a sense on how rare this species is in our region for e-bird.  If possible photographs containing comparisons with other Canada Geese and other waterfowl, such as Mallard is appreciated to help judge size, while true Cackler's are tough to miss, the largest sub-species of Cackling Goose and the smallest sub-species of Canada Goose are very difficult at best to separate in the field.  Photographs of any rare species of Goose are also appreciated (Barnacle and Pink Footed are NYSARC review species)  Also keep your eyes out for Eurasian Wigeon and Tufted Duck as waterfowl numbers rise over the next couple of weeks.

For those who are interested, there are good numbers of GREAT CORMORANTS being seen on the Hudson River between Coxsackie and Germantown.  They are typically found on the navigational markers in the River.  They can be told at a distance, by the white "hip" patch, visible when the birds are standing and in flight.  They also have a white patch near the base of the bill, if you can get a good look at the head.  They are also much larger than Double-crested Cormorants and will look big, when standing next to each other!  Great Cormorants will depart the area by the end of March.  They typically have been rare North of Coeymans, so any reports north of there or on the Mohawk River are appreciated!

Good Birding!


Will Raup

Albany, NY


Color marking/banding of Northern Harriers

clemmy04@ymail.com <clemmy04@...>
 

Thought I'd post this in case anyone spots a painted bird :)

http://wnyt.com/article/stories/s2958927.shtml?cat=300&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

"ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - The state Department of Environmental Conservation is color-marking and banding northern harriers in eastern New York to gather more information on local movements of the hawk, which is threatened in the state.

Biologists are marking the underside of flight feathers or tail feathers and banding with colored and numbered leg bands. They want people who spot these marked birds to email details to Mark NOHA@gw.dec.state.ny.us.

Survey locations include the Washington County Grasslands, Coxsackie Creek Grassland Preserve in Greene County and Shawangunk Grasslands National Wildlife Refuge in Ulster County. Sightings in other areas are also sought.

Northern harriers, formerly called marsh hawks, hunt in grasslands mostly for rodents. They're 16 to 24 inches long with a long tail, yellow legs, a white rump patch and wings held in a shallow "V.""


snow geese

nuthatch1934
 

Yesterday I saw two snow geese in with a flock of Canadas in the Hudson just north of the Green St. road from route 4 to River Road. Not much else of interest in the River escept for a few pairs of goldeneyes. At Clark's Mills pond there were several pairs of common and hooded mergansers.
Dorothy Kelliher


1st year Bald Eagle from Quebec or Massachusetts

curtmorgan@rocketmail.com
 

While checking on the nests of some local Bald Eagles I saw a first year BE fly in near one of the nests in northern Albany County. I expected that this was a bird from that nest last year, but when I looked carefully at my photos I realized that it had an orange band, which is characteristic of those bands in either Quebec or Massachusetts. Since the shots were handheld I was unable to read the code.


Ann Lee Pond and Vischer Ferry

scottjstoner
 

Fairly brief visits this weekend:


Ann Lee pond/Shaker site in Albany County yesterday (March 9) turned up Eastern Bluebird, Pileated Woodpecker - and - skunk cabbages emerged through the snow - a sure sign of spring.


Today (3-10) at Vischer Ferry preserve in Saratoga County we had turkey vultures, common grackle, red-winged blackbirds, a pair of Wood Ducks, Canada Geese sitting atop what could be a nest site.


Scott Stoner and Denise Hackert-Stoner, Loudonville


Short-eared owls and a belated second-hand report of a possible red-headed woodpecker

Jackson Mesick
 

Hey everyone,

My dad and I went up to Washington County for some birding today. We
started by scanning every muddy field we could find along River Rd. for the
previously reported flock of horned larks and single lapland longspur, but
we were not lucky. We did see a fantastic number of Canada Geese flying
north. I would estimate ~1000 just because we also were driving north, and
I can't be sure we didn't have any double counts, but otherwise I would
have said closer to 2000-3000 or more.

We then went up to Fort Edward, where we were rewarded with a single
short-eared owl at ~6:50 PM at the intersection of Blackhouse Rd. and Rt
46, and then another 3-4 at Fitzpatrick Rd. from 6:55-7:25 or so. They
were flying around a lot and not being very shy. One flew by very close
and then perched ~30 yards away - sadly it was pretty dark out.

Lastly, two weeks ago I was talking to a casual birder friend of mine at
church and she told me that she had seen a red-headed woodpecker in her
backyard. She described it saying it had a "whole red head" "not like a
red-bellied" with a "bib" down the front. When I asked her if it was
boldly patterned black and white, she said it was. It sounded reasonably
well-described to me, although obviously this would be quite a rare
sighting. They live on Orchard St. in Bethlehem, a little south of
Brockley Rd. I honestly had thought they were a little closer to Five
Rivers, so I haven't been in that area very much, but now that I know where
they are I'll probably check it out a bit more. If anyone is in the area,
you might consider looking around a bit. She stated it had been there,
then gone for about a week, and then it was back. I didn't manage to talk
to her after the last two sunday church services, so I don't know if she's
seen it since.

Good birding!

Jackson Mesick '11
Slingerlands, NY

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