Date   

Re: Philosophy Discussion Group June meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Steve Rothman
 

Steve has kindly provided below some hopefully helpful info about this month's books selection - JM Berger's "Extremism"

Many local public libraries give their patrons access to Hoopla - which has an audiobook version available.
 
The minuteman library system has two actual book copies, both marked “available” at the moment but I just put in a reserve for one:
 
Didn’t find much in the way of reviews (didn’t look hard) but found this:’
 
Also, the author’s site has a lot of links to various stuff:
 
 


On Jun 7, 2021, at 1:13 PM, Bruce Kaplan via groups.io <blklan71@...> wrote:
Greetings philosophers!

I'm back in town and would like to set up our meeting for the end of June. Gregory has provided an excellent suggestion - JM Berger's "Extremism". Let's plan on discussing that book on Wednesday 6/30 at 7pm on Zoom (link to follow in upcoming weeks). Please let me know your thoughts or if you have any issues/questions.

Hope everyone is doing well in these hot days of late spring!

Looking forward to seeing you in a few weeks.

Best,
Bruce


Philosophy Discussion Group June meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Greetings philosophers!

I'm back in town and would like to set up our meeting for the end of June. Gregory has provided an excellent suggestion - JM Berger's "Extremism". Let's plan on discussing that book on Wednesday 6/30 at 7pm on Zoom (link to follow in upcoming weeks). Please let me know your thoughts or if you have any issues/questions.

Hope everyone is doing well in these hot days of late spring!

Looking forward to seeing you in a few weeks.

Best,
Bruce


Philosophy Discussion Group May meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Greetings philosophers!

Much thanks to all those who came out at the end of April to discuss Terry Eagleton and Marx.

And much thanks to all those who've suggested books for our next meeting.

Speaking of which, it looks like I'll be out of town/on vacation for the end of May/beginning of June. Happy to meet afterwards in mid June or we could wait until the end of the month (June 30). Please let me know your preferences.
Much thanks!

Bruce


Philosophy Discussion Group April meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Greetings all!

Just a reminder that we'll be meeting virtually in a little less than a week to discuss Terry Eagleton's "Why Marx was Right". Zoom link and info below.  Looking forward to seeing you there!

Bruce

Topic: Goethe Institut Philosophy Discussion Zoom Meeting
Time: Apr 28, 2021 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom meeting
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Password: 569850

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Philosophy Discussion Group April meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Greetings philosophers!

  Hope everyone has been safe and healthy.

  Much thanks to all who came out last week to discuss Bakunin.

  Our next virtual meeting will be on Wednesday April 28 at 7pm. We will be discussing Terry Eagleton's "Why Marx was Right". Please let me know if you have difficulty located it [I found an electronic copy on the internet].

Looking forward to seeing you in a few weeks!

Happy reading!

Bruce


Philosophy Discussion Group March meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Greetings philosophers!

Just a quick reminder that we're a little over a day away from our next virtual meeting.
On Wednesday night, 3/31, at 7pm, we'll be meeting to discuss Bakunin's "God and the State".
Zoom info below
Looking forward to seeing you there!

-Bruce

Join Zoom meeting

https://harvard.zoom.us/j/97363212932?pwd=b1VFUEl1bGM5MlR5Y0Vnb1JEeXBndz09

Password: 195532

Join by telephone (use any number to dial in)
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Philosophy Discussion Group March meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Topic: Goethe Society Philosophy Zoom Meeting
Time: Mar 31, 2021 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Just a quick reminder that we're a little over a week away from our next virtual meeting.
On Wednesday night, 3/31, at 7pm, we'll be meeting to discuss Bakunin's "God and the State".
Zoom info below
Looking forward to seeing you there!

-Bruce

Join Zoom meeting

https://harvard.zoom.us/j/97363212932?pwd=b1VFUEl1bGM5MlR5Y0Vnb1JEeXBndz09

Password: 195532

Join by telephone (use any number to dial in)
        +1 312 626 6799
        +1 929 436 2866
        +1 301 715 8592


Re: Philosophy Discussion Group March meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Hom Sack
 

Hello Everyone,

 

These might interest you:

 

Mikhail Bakunin - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyiT5um8kWY&t=661s)

May 18, 2018

VideoScribe animation that introduces the work of Mikhail Bakunin in relationship to power, politics and International Relations. Scripted and read by Dr Nicholas Apoifis.

 

Noam Chomsky - Bakunin’s Predictions - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3gS6g41m_NU)

 

Great Anarchists - Michael Bakunin By Ruth Kinna and Clifford Harper (https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/288357137.pdf)

 

Hom

 

From: giphilosophy@groups.io [mailto:giphilosophy@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Kaplan via groups.io
Sent: Monday, March 8, 2021 6:28 PM
To: giphilosophy@groups.io
Subject: [giphilosophy] Philosophy Discussion Group March meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

 

Greetings philosophers!

  Much thanks to all who came out to discuss Robert O. Paxton's "Anatomy of Fascism" nearly 2 weeks back.

Our next meeting will be on March 30.

I wanted to tackle Terry Eagleton's "Why Marx was Right", but I fear that 3 weeks may not be enough time.

I propose that this month, we read the very short (and unfinished) work by the anarchist thinker Bakunin entitled "God and the State".
Interestingly, there's not only a critique of religion and government but also of the scientific establishment. We've all no doubt seen how these have become intertwined during the pandemic (and before).

Please let me know you're OK with doing this reading for the March meeting. We can set up Eagleton for April.
As always, I'm happy to hear suggestions of things to be read.

Best,
Bruce
 


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Philosophy Discussion Group March meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Greetings philosophers!

  Much thanks to all who came out to discuss Robert O. Paxton's "Anatomy of Fascism" nearly 2 weeks back.

Our next meeting will be on March 30.

I wanted to tackle Terry Eagleton's "Why Marx was Right", but I fear that 3 weeks may not be enough time.

I propose that this month, we read the very short (and unfinished) work by the anarchist thinker Bakunin entitled "God and the State".
Interestingly, there's not only a critique of religion and government but also of the scientific establishment. We've all no doubt seen how these have become intertwined during the pandemic (and before).

Please let me know you're OK with doing this reading for the March meeting. We can set up Eagleton for April.
As always, I'm happy to hear suggestions of things to be read.

Best,
Bruce
 


Philosophy Discussion Group meeting tonight

Bruce Kaplan
 

Just a quick note to remind folks that we'll be meeting tonight at 7 to discuss Robert O. Paxton's "Anatomy of Fascism." Zoom link below.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Topic: Goethe Inst Philosophy Zoom Meeting

Time: Feb 24, 2021 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom meeting
https://harvard.zoom.us/j/92329953417?pwd=OUYrNTRpaldFakVvbjVGK3VBZHBWUT09

Password: 492976

Join by telephone (use any number to dial in)
        +1 301 715 8592
        +1 312 626 6799
        +1 929 436 2866


Philosophy Discussion Group February meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Greetings philosophers!

Just a quick reminder that we'll be meeting virtually this upcoming Wednesday evening at 7pm to discuss Robert O. Paxton's "Anatomy of Fascism".

Zoom info below. Much thanks to Steve for setting this up!

Hope to see you there for the conversation!

Best,
Bruce

Topic: Goethe Inst Philosophy Zoom Meeting
Time: Feb 24, 2021 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom meeting
https://harvard.zoom.us/j/92329953417?pwd=OUYrNTRpaldFakVvbjVGK3VBZHBWUT09

Password: 492976

Join by telephone (use any number to dial in)
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        +1 312 626 6799
        +1 929 436 2866


Paxton Article in Newsweek

Steve Rothman
 

I’m almost done with the Paxton book “The Anatomy of Fascism” and have found it to be well-written and educational. I’m too ignorant about history to be sure it’s all accurate, but it all seems very plausible to me.

Just ran across an essay Paxton published on the Newsweek site, dated just yesterday: https://www.newsweek.com/robert-paxton-trump-fascist-1560652

He’s 88 so I’m glad he’s still writing about current events!

Looking forward to our meeting on the 24th.

-Steve


Philosophy Discussion Group February meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Much thanks to everyone who came out on Zoom last evening to discuss Kropotkin and Mutual Aid!

As promised here is the link to the late David Graeber's preface to a recent reissue of Mutual Aid:
https://truthout.org/articles/david-graeber-left-us-a-parting-gift-his-thoughts-on-kropotkins-mutual-aid/

And if you have Netflix, do check out the Fran Lebowitz / Martin Scorsese series "Pretend It's A City". The 1st episode has that bit I mentioned about her railing against people absorbed in their phones with little to no interest in other people. And in the spirit of mutual aid, even though she's a misanthropic curmudgeon's curmudgeon, she mentions that she offers to help people when asked.

Next month we'll be meeting on Web. Feb. 24 to discuss Robert O. Paxton's "The Anatomy of Fascism". Please let me know if you have any difficulty locating it.

Happy reading!

Bruce


A contemporary look at the concept of mutual aid?

Steve Rothman
 


Just in time to coincide with our book discussion! - a brand new paper by Joseph Henrich and Michael Muthukrishna (Harvard and LSE, respectively) called "The Origins and Psychology of Human Cooperation.”

Abstract and first paragraph:

ABSTRACT
Illuminating the puzzle of our species’ ultrasociality requires not only explaining the breadth and
intensity of human cooperation but also why it varies across societies, over history and among
behavioral domains (within societies). To address these patterns, we introduce an evolutionary
approach that considers how genetic and cultural evolution, as well as their interaction, may have
shaped both the reliably developing features of our minds and the well-documented differences in
cultural psychologies around the globe. We review the major evolutionary mechanisms that have
been proposed to explain human cooperation, including kinship, reciprocity (partner choice),
reputation, signaling and punishment, discuss key culture-gene coevolutionary hypotheses, such as
those surrounding self-domestication and norm psychology, and consider the role of religions,
rituals and marriage systems. Empirically, we bring together diverse experimental, observational, and
anthropological evidence from studies of children and adults from diverse societies as well as from
non-human primates.

The origins and nature of our species’ cooperative psychology and prosocial behavior has been a
major scientific challenge since at least the time of Darwin. Recently, however, progress on this
question has accelerated with the rise of a highly interdisciplinary version of evolutionary
psychology, one that takes seriously our status as the “third chimpanzee” (Diamond 2006), but also
recognizes that humans have become a uniquely cultural species. Here we chart progress in this
endeavor with the aim of directing ongoing research, clarifying key debates, and connecting
psychology to the broader scientific exploration of cooperation.

I’ve just skimmed the paper, but I’ve read Henrich’s two books and think he’s quite interesting. He’s the chair of Harvard’s "Human and Evolutionary Biology" Department.


-Steve


Philosophy Discussion Group this Wednesday evening - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Greetings philosophers!

Just a quick reminder that the virtual meeting will occur this Wednesday evening (1/27) from 7-9pm
We will be discussing Mutual Aid by Kropotkin.
Info follows below:

Hope to see you there!
Bruce

Topic: Goethe Philosophy Discussion Zoom Meeting
Time: Jan 27, 2021 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom meeting
https://harvard.zoom.us/j/92432798181?pwd=VGVseldkWE5mQzJGTmNEcVprR3Bqdz09

Password: 864247

Join by telephone (use any number to dial in)
        +1 301 715 8592
        +1 312 626 6799
        +1 929 436 2866


Re: Kropotkin’s Mutual Aid - what does he mean by “stem”?

Steve Rothman
 

Thanks Hom and Isabel!

Makes sense, I just have never run across the word used that way before.

-Steve

On Jan 17, 2021, at 3:01 PM, Hom Sack <hom.sack@...> wrote:



I think you are right that "stem" means family in this context:

 

"Stems are seen to fight against stems, tribes against tribes, individuals against individuals; ..."

 

In a broader sense, from "stem group":

 

stem group - Wiktionary (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/stem_group)

(phylogenetics) A paraphyletic group consisting of an ancestor and all its descendants, excluding the living representatives of a collection of species.

 

Crown group - Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crown_group#Stem_groups)

 

From: giphilosophy@groups.io [mailto:giphilosophy@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Rothman via groups.io
Sent: Monday, January 11, 2021 7:41 PM
To: giphilosophy@groups.io
Subject: [giphilosophy] Kropotkin’s Mutual Aid - what does he mean by “stem”?

 

A question!

In Chapter 4 Kropotkin refers to “stems.” From context, I think he means something like families or tribes, or maybe it’s kind of like a stem of a family tree of people? He uses the term frequently and I just don’t get it.

 

Any ideas?

 

Here’s the first usage, from the first page of Chapter 4:

 

“However, as soon as we come to a higher stage of civilization, and refer to history which already has something to say about that stage, we are bewildered by the struggles and conflicts which it reveals. The old bonds seem entirely to be broken. Stems are seen to fight against stems, tribes against tribes, individuals against individuals; and out of this chaotic contest of hostile forces, mankind issues divided into castes, enslaved to despots, separated into States always ready to wage war against each other.”

 

The term is used many times, in similar contexts in Ch.4, but not previously in the book.

 

I’ve checked a few dictionaries with no help. Makes me wonder if it’s a translation or typesetting problem. I’m reading a free digital copy so maybe I’m getting what I paid for <smile>. 

 

Grateful for any clues! -Steve



On Jan 6, 2021, at 1:11 PM, Bruce Kaplan via groups.io <blklan71@...> wrote:

Greeting Philosophers!

Happy New Year! Hope all are staying warm, safe, healthy and sane.

Much thanks to those who joined us on the evening of December 30 to discuss William James's Pragmatism.

Our next meeting will be on the evening of Wednesday January 27 from 7-9pm. I am proposing we discuss Kropotkin's essay "Mutual Aid". Mutual Aid has become a timely hot topic during the pandemic even after then recent surprising renewed interest and popularity among evolutionary biologists.

This essay is available online for free in many locations. Please let me know if you have any issues finding it.
I will be sending along a Zoom link for the session closer to the date of our meeting.
Happy reading!

Best,
Bruce


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Kropotkin’s Mutual Aid - what does he mean by “stem”?

Hom Sack
 

I think you are right that "stem" means family in this context:

 

"Stems are seen to fight against stems, tribes against tribes, individuals against individuals; ..."

 

In a broader sense, from "stem group":

 

stem group - Wiktionary (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/stem_group)

(phylogenetics) A paraphyletic group consisting of an ancestor and all its descendants, excluding the living representatives of a collection of species.

 

Crown group - Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crown_group#Stem_groups)

 

From: giphilosophy@groups.io [mailto:giphilosophy@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Rothman via groups.io
Sent: Monday, January 11, 2021 7:41 PM
To: giphilosophy@groups.io
Subject: [giphilosophy] Kropotkin’s Mutual Aid - what does he mean by “stem”?

 

A question!

In Chapter 4 Kropotkin refers to “stems.” From context, I think he means something like families or tribes, or maybe it’s kind of like a stem of a family tree of people? He uses the term frequently and I just don’t get it.

 

Any ideas?

 

Here’s the first usage, from the first page of Chapter 4:

 

“However, as soon as we come to a higher stage of civilization, and refer to history which already has something to say about that stage, we are bewildered by the struggles and conflicts which it reveals. The old bonds seem entirely to be broken. Stems are seen to fight against stems, tribes against tribes, individuals against individuals; and out of this chaotic contest of hostile forces, mankind issues divided into castes, enslaved to despots, separated into States always ready to wage war against each other.”

 

The term is used many times, in similar contexts in Ch.4, but not previously in the book.

 

I’ve checked a few dictionaries with no help. Makes me wonder if it’s a translation or typesetting problem. I’m reading a free digital copy so maybe I’m getting what I paid for <smile>. 

 

Grateful for any clues! -Steve



On Jan 6, 2021, at 1:11 PM, Bruce Kaplan via groups.io <blklan71@...> wrote:

Greeting Philosophers!

Happy New Year! Hope all are staying warm, safe, healthy and sane.

Much thanks to those who joined us on the evening of December 30 to discuss William James's Pragmatism.

Our next meeting will be on the evening of Wednesday January 27 from 7-9pm. I am proposing we discuss Kropotkin's essay "Mutual Aid". Mutual Aid has become a timely hot topic during the pandemic even after then recent surprising renewed interest and popularity among evolutionary biologists.

This essay is available online for free in many locations. Please let me know if you have any issues finding it.
I will be sending along a Zoom link for the session closer to the date of our meeting.
Happy reading!

Best,
Bruce


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Kropotkin’s Mutual Aid - what does he mean by “stem”?

Isabel Cunha-Vasconcelos
 

Hi Steve,

Stem stands for branch of a family.

Cheers,

Isabel

On Jan 17, 2021, at 11:59 AM, Steve Rothman via groups.io <smr=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:

Stems


Kropotkin’s Mutual Aid - what does he mean by “stem”?

Steve Rothman
 

A question!

In Chapter 4 Kropotkin refers to “stems.” From context, I think he means something like families or tribes, or maybe it’s kind of like a stem of a family tree of people? He uses the term frequently and I just don’t get it.

Any ideas?

Here’s the first usage, from the first page of Chapter 4:

“However, as soon as we come to a higher stage of civilization, and refer to history which already has something to say about that stage, we are bewildered by the struggles and conflicts which it reveals. The old bonds seem entirely to be broken. Stems are seen to fight against stems, tribes against tribes, individuals against individuals; and out of this chaotic contest of hostile forces, mankind issues divided into castes, enslaved to despots, separated into States always ready to wage war against each other.”

The term is used many times, in similar contexts in Ch.4, but not previously in the book.

I’ve checked a few dictionaries with no help. Makes me wonder if it’s a translation or typesetting problem. I’m reading a free digital copy so maybe I’m getting what I paid for <smile>. 

Grateful for any clues! -Steve

On Jan 6, 2021, at 1:11 PM, Bruce Kaplan via groups.io <blklan71@...> wrote:

Greeting Philosophers!

Happy New Year! Hope all are staying warm, safe, healthy and sane.

Much thanks to those who joined us on the evening of December 30 to discuss William James's Pragmatism.

Our next meeting will be on the evening of Wednesday January 27 from 7-9pm. I am proposing we discuss Kropotkin's essay "Mutual Aid". Mutual Aid has become a timely hot topic during the pandemic even after then recent surprising renewed interest and popularity among evolutionary biologists.

This essay is available online for free in many locations. Please let me know if you have any issues finding it.
I will be sending along a Zoom link for the session closer to the date of our meeting.
Happy reading!

Best,
Bruce


Philosophy Discussion Group January meeting - normally meeting at the Goethe Institut

Bruce Kaplan
 

Greeting Philosophers!

Happy New Year! Hope all are staying warm, safe, healthy and sane.

Much thanks to those who joined us on the evening of December 30 to discuss William James's Pragmatism.

Our next meeting will be on the evening of Wednesday January 27 from 7-9pm. I am proposing we discuss Kropotkin's essay "Mutual Aid". Mutual Aid has become a timely hot topic during the pandemic even after then recent surprising renewed interest and popularity among evolutionary biologists.

This essay is available online for free in many locations. Please let me know if you have any issues finding it.
I will be sending along a Zoom link for the session closer to the date of our meeting.
Happy reading!

Best,
Bruce

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