Where to get cold rolled steel Ireland/UK #lathe


dave.tolan@...
 

I'm just starting a gingery lathe, can anyone recommend somewhere to get cold rolled steel for the ways for Ireland (or UK if they will ship).
Anywhere online that I have found is expensive or won't ship to Ireland.
Thanks
Btw I've done some metal casting, built a sail boat, built my own workshop, so I'm reasonably handy, but I've not done any machining.


tobias green
 

Hi, I've been looking into it myself and found these two points while researching 

Cold Rolled Steel. Cold rolled steel is essentially hot rolled steel that has had further processing. The steel is processed further in cold reduction mills, where the material is cooled (at room temperature) followed by annealing and/or tempers rolling

What is Bright Steel ? Bright steel is usually a carbon steel alloy which has had the surface condition improved by drawing, peeling or grinding over the hot rolled finish supplied by the steel mill. Bright steel is essentially black steel material that has had further processing.

So I think we're looking for Bright steel, and that's available at metalsupermarkets.com.... I live close to Leeds, got family in Northern Ireland, but no one is going back and forth due to covid. Could have done it with a Polish courier if you know any, they go everywhere.

I thought I'd have a look since I'm doing the series too.... But I'm still building the shed.... Disabled and don't work so a steady pace. I did find precision ground bars for my MultiMachine ways.... Maybe you can find them in Ireland if the objective is to just build a lathe.

If you don't have any luck I'm driving over to the North when the covid stuff ends... Don't mind helping 

Toby 


On Wed, 20 May 2020, 11:10 , <dave.tolan@...> wrote:
I'm just starting a gingery lathe, can anyone recommend somewhere to get cold rolled steel for the ways for Ireland (or UK if they will ship).
Anywhere online that I have found is expensive or won't ship to Ireland.
Thanks
Btw I've done some metal casting, built a sail boat, built my own workshop, so I'm reasonably handy, but I've not done any machining.


John Dammeyer
 

Welcome.  I started out the same way with the only machining experience from grade 8 shop class and owning a tiny DB-200 lathe.

 

I built the Gingery Gas Fired Furnace, using the Gingery Power hack saw and Slip roll.  I had friends weld where it was needed.  I did not build the Gingery Drill Press or Shaper or Mill.  I got around needing those because I bought a replacement spindle for my Sears 16" drill press and had a friend use a D bit to bore a hole down the middle of it.

 

I then installed a draw bar to the MT3 tooling and bought some MT3 tool holders and an XY Vise.  I later upgraded to an XY table.

 

Between a surface plate and the milling from the now renamed MillPress I was able to build the Gingery.  I never did do the dividing head or gears.  I ran it with the sewing machine O ring belts and pulleys for a while and then designed the Electronic Lead Screw for it. 

 

I know have a Heavy 10L South Bend and the equivalent to a Grizzly G3616 mill.  The South Bend has an ELS on the Z axis.  Nothing on the X.  The mill has been converted to Linux/MACH CNC.  (dual boot).   I'd still like to build the Gingery Shaper and mill as an exercise but compared to cast iron there is no comparison.

 

So, having said all that.  If you want a lathe with the low cost of far east iron, buy one.  If you want to learn to cast then build the gingery exactly to the drawings.  Don't try to scale it up or enhance it at the beginning although there are a few tiny things that improve it.

 

This group is full of postings of people who started making it larger/better but then gave up.  A few have done it.  But most quit.  And the ability to follow directions/drawings is an important part machining skills.

 

And welcome to a mind blowing experience.  You won't regret it.

 

John Dammeyer

 

From: gingery-machines@groups.io [mailto:gingery-machines@groups.io] On Behalf Of dave.tolan@...
Sent: May-19-20 11:55 PM
To: gingery-machines@groups.io
Subject: [gingery-machines] Where to get cold rolled steel Ireland/UK #lathe #lathe #lathe #lathe

 

I'm just starting a gingery lathe, can anyone recommend somewhere to get cold rolled steel for the ways for Ireland (or UK if they will ship).
Anywhere online that I have found is expensive or won't ship to Ireland.
Thanks
Btw I've done some metal casting, built a sail boat, built my own workshop, so I'm reasonably handy, but I've not done any machining.


dave.tolan@...
 

Looking for bright steel, I found a guy on eBay selling short lengths. 


dave.tolan@...
 

Yes, I followed the old Yahoo group before. The goal is to build. I've seen some very small incremental improvements that look credible, but I'm pretty much building to plan.


John Dammeyer
 

There are a few things to do that improve the lathe and aren't really that difficult.

1.      Combating twist with a double row of screws.

a.       http://www.autoartisans.com/gingery.htm

b.      I would also use X bracing instead of the rectangles  in the bed casting if I were to do it again.  To combat twist.

2.      I made a wider foot for the spindle side with anchor points to hang the motor off to create a triangle.  I found my plywood base caused flex with slightly out of round pulleys.

a.       I never did cast and turn new pulleys.

b.      http://www.autoartisans.com/Lathe/FOOT1.JPG

3.      I found the lantern tool post soon pulled out of the aluminium cast compound.

a.       http://www.autoartisans.com/Lathe/LANTP.JPG

b.      I ended up recasting that in bronze with lots of tapped screw holes.

c.       http://www.autoartisans.com/gingery/Gingery_ELS.jpg

 

Something else I would do but does require some major redesign (so I haven't) is change the proportion of carriage width to depth.  Years back I did a survey of a large number of commercial lathes.  They all had one thing in common.  The width of the carriage was greater than the depth which prevents racking of the carriage as it moves.   I think it was around 1.4 so it should really be about 5.6" wide.  Not a problem near the headstock but does restrict the tailstock a bit.

 

Overall.  Have fun.  I learned so much from that project.

John

 

 

From: gingery-machines@groups.io [mailto:gingery-machines@groups.io] On Behalf Of dave.tolan@...
Sent: May-21-20 7:31 AM
To: gingery-machines@groups.io
Subject: Re: [gingery-machines] Where to get cold rolled steel Ireland/UK #lathe

 

Yes, I followed the old Yahoo group before. The goal is to build. I've seen some very small incremental improvements that look credible, but I'm pretty much building to plan.


dave.tolan@...
 

Very cool, great pic of the lathe.
I might follow some of those.


John Dammeyer
 

Ask away for pictures.  I still have all the patterns.  Even the flask for the bed pour.  At one point I bought some pieces of 2" thick wall box steel to weld together into the base frame.  Onto that I was going to weld a 3"x1/4" section for holding the ways along with feet on the bottom for bolting it down.

 

Then stick it into the foundry to bring it to red heat and let it cool slowly to remove the welding stresses.  Drill the holes for the CRS ways.   Then take it to an engine rebuild shop and have them skim the top to bring it as flat as possible.

 

The plan was to fill it with concrete or an epoxy sand mix to deaden it further.  At that point as long as my mounting holes matched it should be possible to swap out the existing mount and start with a much stiffer bed.  But that's now on the long list of projects I want to do but might never get to.

 

John

 

 

From: gingery-machines@groups.io [mailto:gingery-machines@groups.io] On Behalf Of dave.tolan@...
Sent: May-22-20 8:38 AM
To: gingery-machines@groups.io
Subject: Re: [gingery-machines] Where to get cold rolled steel Ireland/UK #lathe

 

Very cool, great pic of the lathe.
I might follow some of those.