Mystery


james o'kelly
 

Not a technical problem, but a record source, I have come across two records of christening for the same person on two different occasions, one in 1813 and another in 1814, has anyone else found this?, and how can this be? would appreciate any input, I believe they are at the same church,


colevalleygirl@colevalleygirl.co.uk
 

I have an example of a repeated baptism here: https://genealogy.stackexchange.com/q/15307/6485. Was the first baptism private and the second simply a record of the child being received?

 

There’s another example here: https://genealogy.stackexchange.com/questions/3057/why-was-flossie-baptised-twice-1898-1903-at-stalbridge-dorset-england

 

 

 

From: family-historian@groups.io <family-historian@groups.io> On Behalf Of james o'kelly
Sent: 13 February 2021 20:33
To: family-historian@groups.io
Subject: [family-historian] Mystery

 

Not a technical problem, but a record source, I have come across two records of christening for the same person on two different occasions, one in 1813 and another in 1814, has anyone else found this?, and how can this be? would appreciate any input, I believe they are at the same church,


Robin
 

I have found similar anomalies. It has often been there has been a birth, christening and death in quick succession. The next year a birth and christening uses the same name as was fairly common in those times. If this is on a transcription it could be an error but when it is the original church record it would more likely be correct.

Robin Dew

 

From: family-historian@groups.io [mailto:family-historian@groups.io] On Behalf Of james o'kelly
Sent: 13 February 2021 20:33
To: family-historian@groups.io
Subject: [family-historian] Mystery

 

Not a technical problem, but a record source, I have come across two records of christening for the same person on two different occasions, one in 1813 and another in 1814, has anyone else found this?, and how can this be? would appreciate any input, I believe they are at the same church,


Brian Horridge
 

James

Another scenario is where several children are baptised at the same time (ie "job lot").  If this is the case for the 1814 one, it could be that the parents decided to do the older child (1813 child) again "just in case".  I have found a couple of instances of this.

Brian

On 13/02/2021 20:32, james o'kelly wrote:
Not a technical problem, but a record source, I have come across two records of christening for the same person on two different occasions, one in 1813 and another in 1814, has anyone else found this?, and how can this be? would appreciate any input, I believe they are at the same church,

Virus-free. www.avg.com


John Hanson
 

James

Without knowing the source of both here are a number of possibilities

1 – as others have said a private and then church baptism

2 – Different churches

3 – one from parish records and the other from BTs (the clerk got it wrong)

If you got them from ancestry of findmypast both with tell you whether they are PR or BT and also the name of the church

 

Regards
John Hanson - researching the Halstead/Holstead/Alstead names
Researcher, the Halsted Trust - https://www.halsted.org.uk
Research website - https://www.halstedresearch.org.uk

2021 Family History Conference - https://www.elizabethanancestors.org.uk

 

 

 

From: family-historian@groups.io <family-historian@groups.io> On Behalf Of james o'kelly
Sent: 13 February 2021 20:33
To: family-historian@groups.io
Subject: [family-historian] Mystery

 

Not a technical problem, but a record source, I have come across two records of christening for the same person on two different occasions, one in 1813 and another in 1814, has anyone else found this?, and how can this be? would appreciate any input, I believe they are at the same church,


Geoffrey Knott
 

If an unbaptised person died it was thought that he/she would not be received into heaven: so if a newborn or unbaptised child was thought to be unlikely to survive, a fairly common practice was for a baptism to be arranged at the home. This would usually, but not always, be indicated in the register by a 'P' or 'half-baptised'. If the child subsequently survived, a full church baptism would be held, again usually, but not always, marked in the register as 'received into the church'.

Hopr this helps.

Geoff

On 13/02/2021 20:32, james o'kelly wrote:
Not a technical problem, but a record source, I have come across two records of christening for the same person on two different occasions, one in 1813 and another in 1814, has anyone else found this?, and how can this be? would appreciate any input, I believe they are at the same church,


Julia Vokes
 

And if the two baptisms are several years apart it can indicate that the first child died and the second child was named after the first one, quite a common practice.  So worth checking burial registers as well.

Regards
Julia 


On 14 Feb 2021, at 10:06, Geoffrey Knott <geoff0knott@...> wrote:



If an unbaptised person died it was thought that he/she would not be received into heaven: so if a newborn or unbaptised child was thought to be unlikely to survive, a fairly common practice was for a baptism to be arranged at the home. This would usually, but not always, be indicated in the register by a 'P' or 'half-baptised'. If the child subsequently survived, a full church baptism would be held, again usually, but not always, marked in the register as 'received into the church'.

Hopr this helps.

Geoff

On 13/02/2021 20:32, james o'kelly wrote:
Not a technical problem, but a record source, I have come across two records of christening for the same person on two different occasions, one in 1813 and another in 1814, has anyone else found this?, and how can this be? would appreciate any input, I believe they are at the same church,


Lorna Craig
 

James,

You haven't told us which person/people on the page you are referring to.

However, I think the 1813 page shows:

"(Oct) 12th Coote, Charles Nurse, Son of Chas Nurse and Mary Coote late Garwood(?) spinster/ priv. baptized born April 30th."

And the 1814 page shows:

" 16th Coote, George and Charles Sons of Chad Nurse and Mary Coote, received into the Church June 16th".  And in the first column just below "16th" there is "13*"

So the 1813 page is saying that Charles Nurse Coote was born on 30 April 1813 and privately baptized on 12 October 1813.   And the 1814 page is saying that Charles and his brother George were both received into the Church on 16 June 1814.  The "13*" is probably indicating that they (at least, Charles) had been baptised in 1813.    As others have explained, a private baptism took place if a child was ill, in case they died.  The child was later formally 'received into the Church'.

The only oddity is that in 1813 the father was a cordwainer (shoemaker) and in 1814 he was a grocer, according to the left hand margins.

Lorna

On 13/02/2021 20:32, james o'kelly wrote:
Not a technical problem, but a record source, I have come across two records of christening for the same person on two different occasions, one in 1813 and another in 1814, has anyone else found this?, and how can this be? would appreciate any input, I believe they are at the same church,
_


james o'kelly
 

thank you all for your replies, sorry I should have pointed out it was the Coote's in question, this has helped me sort out who was who, Thanks again 

James

On Sun, Feb 14, 2021 at 1:32 PM Lorna Craig via groups.io <l.m.craig=ntlworld.com@groups.io> wrote:

James,

You haven't told us which person/people on the page you are referring to.

However, I think the 1813 page shows:

"(Oct) 12th Coote, Charles Nurse, Son of Chas Nurse and Mary Coote late Garwood(?) spinster/ priv. baptized born April 30th."

And the 1814 page shows:

" 16th Coote, George and Charles Sons of Chad Nurse and Mary Coote, received into the Church June 16th".  And in the first column just below "16th" there is "13*"

So the 1813 page is saying that Charles Nurse Coote was born on 30 April 1813 and privately baptized on 12 October 1813.   And the 1814 page is saying that Charles and his brother George were both received into the Church on 16 June 1814.  The "13*" is probably indicating that they (at least, Charles) had been baptised in 1813.    As others have explained, a private baptism took place if a child was ill, in case they died.  The child was later formally 'received into the Church'.

The only oddity is that in 1813 the father was a cordwainer (shoemaker) and in 1814 he was a grocer, according to the left hand margins.

Lorna

On 13/02/2021 20:32, james o'kelly wrote:
Not a technical problem, but a record source, I have come across two records of christening for the same person on two different occasions, one in 1813 and another in 1814, has anyone else found this?, and how can this be? would appreciate any input, I believe they are at the same church,
_