Topics

What's changed for you as a result of the global disruption in togetherness?


J. B. Rainsberger
 

Hi, folks. I'm so glad to see occasional-but-furious discussion here. (I mean "furious" in a good way.) Thank you.

I'm curious how things have changed for you during this global disruption in sharing physical space. Tell stories!

I moved one physical training session (2 days) into Zoomland and the result did not thrill me. We did well enough with what we had, but I definitely did not like losing the ability to wander around the room and look over people's shoulders to ask questions. I think they felt OK with the results, but they were pot-committed: we were supposed to run the training on March 15 and I canceled on March 13 due to worries that if I traveled to Nova Scotia, I wouldn't be able to re-enter Prince Edward Island. I was off on that by only one week. :)

Otherwise, our plans to travel to Europe in September have disintegrated along with several weeks of on-site client visits. This has led to starting work with one new client remotely (but who knows where they will go?) and renewed interest in building new online training content.

One thing is certain: I will not start a podcast. You're welcome.

I'm trying to see this disruption as an opportunity to try hybrid models of self-study and real-time training. If I could wave my magic wand, I'd have a few clients who spend a handful of hours per month with me in some combination of 1:1 coaching and pair-work, but otherwise subject their people to some self-study training for the fundamentals. I got to experiment last year with two clients who took my World's Best Intro to TDD training course before I got there to do a more in-depth technical excellence workshop. I'd like to have more of those kinds of relationships: don't pay me big money for the fundamentals; but rather pay me big money for the "real stuff". Has anyone else tried to do this? Anything to report?

I'm also starting to write again. Part of me feels like I ought to have something new to write about, but the rest of me understands that many people weren't listening the last time, so there's little harm in writing about it again. I might do it much better this time.

Finally, I have a vague feeling like I'd like to fall in love with programming again, but everything is broken and nobody seems to mind. Elm is the closest I've come to finding a programming environment that I actually like. I'd love to know what other people have experienced in this general direction.

There. Whew. Thanks. Stay safe and stay away from each other, unless you're in Sweden, in which case stay away from vulnerable people.
--


James Grenning
 

Hi Joe

I've done 28 remote delivered courses over the last 5+ years. 5 this year. I use a customized cyber-dojo server for my training exercise server (remote or on-site). I can see every time someone presses the test button. Live is better as you can look over a shoulder too.

Here is the cyber-dojo dashboard with Red/Green/Amber (fail/pass/broken build). Click a traffic light and see the difference from the last test press. I'd be happy to give you a tour if you have not seen it.

I'm also working on my teachable content still. I like the idea of learning the basics before a trip so the client can dig deeper.

Cheers, James


James Grenning - Author of TDD for Embedded C - wingman-sw.com/tddec
wingman-sw.com
wingman-sw.com/blog
twitter.com/jwgrenning
facebook.com/wingman.sw
wingman software

On 5 May 2020, at 17:11, J. B. Rainsberger wrote:

Hi, folks. I'm so glad to see occasional-but-furious discussion here. (I mean "furious" in a good way.) Thank you.

I'm curious how things have changed for you during this global disruption in sharing physical space. Tell stories!

I moved one physical training session (2 days) into Zoomland and the result did not thrill me. We did well enough with what we had, but I definitely did not like losing the ability to wander around the room and look over people's shoulders to ask questions. I think they felt OK with the results, but they were pot-committed: we were supposed to run the training on March 15 and I canceled on March 13 due to worries that if I traveled to Nova Scotia, I wouldn't be able to re-enter Prince Edward Island. I was off on that by only one week. :)

Otherwise, our plans to travel to Europe in September have disintegrated along with several weeks of on-site client visits. This has led to starting work with one new client remotely (but who knows where they will go?) and renewed interest in building new online training content.

One thing is certain: I will not start a podcast. You're welcome.

I'm trying to see this disruption as an opportunity to try hybrid models of self-study and real-time training. If I could wave my magic wand, I'd have a few clients who spend a handful of hours per month with me in some combination of 1:1 coaching and pair-work, but otherwise subject their people to some self-study training for the fundamentals. I got to experiment last year with two clients who took my World's Best Intro to TDD training course before I got there to do a more in-depth technical excellence workshop. I'd like to have more of those kinds of relationships: don't pay me big money for the fundamentals; but rather pay me big money for the "real stuff". Has anyone else tried to do this? Anything to report?

I'm also starting to write again. Part of me feels like I ought to have something new to write about, but the rest of me understands that many people weren't listening the last time, so there's little harm in writing about it again. I might do it much better this time.

Finally, I have a vague feeling like I'd like to fall in love with programming again, but everything is broken and nobody seems to mind. Elm is the closest I've come to finding a programming environment that I actually like. I'd love to know what other people have experienced in this general direction.

There. Whew. Thanks. Stay safe and stay away from each other, unless you're in Sweden, in which case stay away from vulnerable people.
--


Jeff Langr
 

Hi JB--

Thanks for the update! Happy to hear how other folks are coping. Putting together a response here helped me capture some personal experiences with trying to make remote coding effective.

I'd been pushing more remote with folks at my current primary customer back in January or so. We'd also been mobbing both in-person and some remotely as well. As a result, the whole COVID thing was almost a natural transition--the rest of the world was falling apart and our teams didn't really feel much of a difference. Remote mobbing isn't a whole lot different than in-person mobbing.

The pandemic also prodded me to run more short experiments (which is one of Kilby & Rothman's suggestions in their remote agile book, also) around making remote coding more effective.

I tried gobs of different things, probably more than I'd played with in a several prior years of remote work. I tried VS Code LiveShare, Floobits, Screen.so, and a pile of other comparable products based on folks' recommendations.

The net: they all suck in their own special way.

* Remote screen control: too much lag to be effective + enjoyable (or maybe "not irritating"). That also included Screen.so, whose developer claimed he'd gotten it down to a 25ms lag time. I think I tried 5 different screen share + remote control tools.
* Floobits (a fileshare-based tool): during my first real 3-hour session, I had a few periods where the file syncing stopped for *a full minute*. No response received from support (even though I'd joined the pay plan).
* VS Code LiveShare: didn't work. I've heard other people have used it effectively, but it didn't work for us; we gave up after a couple hours.

Floobits held rich promise--hey, pick the IDE you like and work in your own comfortable world. No Eclipse (but then again I no longer use it and none of my customers do).

That's important and worth a lot--giving up the power of a strong IDE stinks when you've learned how to get the most from it. I hear that some folks are mobbing on examples using cyber-dojo as a shared editing environment. No thanks--though I know James gets a lot out of training with the tool. (At least give me an opportunity to use vim, for f's sake.)

To cut to the chase: I've been doing this with my current customer, and we've been doing weekly mobbing ("PubMob" on Fridays; see my twitter feed) and doing git handovers using remotemobprogramming/mob. Works great; handover time is a few seconds, and you get to work in your own, utmost-comfy environment. I immensely enjoy remote coding now, and the sessions (combinations of coaching & development) are still highly effective.

As far as training: mobbing has limits, and I've done TDD training with 8 folks in a mob... but more than that would likely start losing folks. I haven't tried a remote TDD class in a while; I hope to do some soon to start exploring this more.

Regards,
Jeff



J. B. Rainsberger wrote on 5/5/20 3:11 PM:

Hi, folks. I'm so glad to see occasional-but-furious discussion here. (I mean "furious" in a good way.) Thank you.

I'm curious how things have changed for you during this global disruption in sharing physical space. Tell stories!

I moved one physical training session (2 days) into Zoomland and the result did not thrill me. We did well enough with what we had, but I definitely did not like losing the ability to wander around the room and look over people's shoulders to ask questions. I think they felt OK with the results, but they were pot-committed: we were supposed to run the training on March 15 and I canceled on March 13 due to worries that if I traveled to Nova Scotia, I wouldn't be able to re-enter Prince Edward Island. I was off on that by only one week. :)

Otherwise, our plans to travel to Europe in September have disintegrated along with several weeks of on-site client visits. This has led to starting work with one new client remotely (but who knows where they will go?) and renewed interest in building new online training content.

One thing is certain: I will not start a podcast. You're welcome.

I'm trying to see this disruption as an opportunity to try hybrid models of self-study and real-time training. If I could wave my magic wand, I'd have a few clients who spend a handful of hours per month with me in some combination of 1:1 coaching and pair-work, but otherwise subject their people to some self-study training for the fundamentals. I got to experiment last year with two clients who took my World's Best Intro to TDD training course before I got there to do a more in-depth technical excellence workshop. I'd like to have more of those kinds of relationships: don't pay me big money for the fundamentals; but rather pay me big money for the "real stuff". Has anyone else tried to do this? Anything to report?

I'm also starting to write again. Part of me feels like I ought to have something new to write about, but the rest of me understands that many people weren't listening the last time, so there's little harm in writing about it again. I might do it much better this time.

Finally, I have a vague feeling like I'd like to fall in love with programming again, but everything is broken and nobody seems to mind. Elm is the closest I've come to finding a programming environment that I actually like. I'd love to know what other people have experienced in this general direction.

There. Whew. Thanks. Stay safe and stay away from each other, unless you're in Sweden, in which case stay away from vulnerable people.
--


Dave Nicolette
 

Really interesting to read about how different people have been
responding to the situation. James is a model for me - I think he has
been able to thrive in the remote environment because he was already
doing it and was established in the market with that model. As for me,
I've adapted one in-person training class to the virtual environment
and working on a second, but the results to date have been very poor.
It seems no one is willing to pay a single dollar for any sort of
technical training whatsoever. People are paying for classes that
result in some sort of certification, but even then they aren't paying
what they used to. James is a notable exception.

At the same time, there's almost no coaching work to be had at all.
Most companies are rolling up like frightened armadillos and waiting
until the virus passes before they will invest in anything or grow
staff. I can't even find a gig as a programmer. So, we're in jeopardy
of losing our house in the next 4 to 5 months. We're living off our
retirement savings now. I do have a small income from a client in
Italy, but it's not sufficient to pay our living expenses. It is
slowing the decline, for now. Don't know how long it will continue.

I'll probably be making videos and doing small things online just to
try and stay visible to the market. But if things don't turn around in
a few months, I'll probably have to look for some other kind of work
besides software-related work. I have no idea what that could be.
Maybe painting houses or delivering food, or something. Will have to
adapt and improvise. It is a humbling experience, to be sure.

I've been using the time to take advantage of some of the newly-free
training out there. It's fun and I'm learning a lot, even if I will
never use it. Like Jeff, I'm experimenting with various remote mob
programming setups. He already reported his results with floobits. I'm
going to try floobits on my next one, May 14. I want to join Jeff's
PubMobs whenever my schedule allows, and see how the "mob" tool feels.
I'm dockerizing IntelliJ IDEA for my next remote mob session, and I
want to try floobits. That setup, if it works well, would enable
participants to commit to github without the "mob" tool. We'll see how
it goes. So far, dockerizing IntelliJ IDEA has been a pain, and
running it in the container has been approximately 14x slower than
running it on my laptop. This does not bode well. But we'll see. The
other option is to have everyone configure their own IntelliJ instance
consistent with the mob project. That's far from ideal.

On a personal level, I really like working remotely from my home
office. I'm hopeful that things will turn around, and the world will
have changed in such a way that remote work is far more possible than
it has been in the past.

On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 2:11 PM J. B. Rainsberger <jbrains762@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi, folks. I'm so glad to see occasional-but-furious discussion here. (I mean "furious" in a good way.) Thank you.

I'm curious how things have changed for you during this global disruption in sharing physical space. Tell stories!

I moved one physical training session (2 days) into Zoomland and the result did not thrill me. We did well enough with what we had, but I definitely did not like losing the ability to wander around the room and look over people's shoulders to ask questions. I think they felt OK with the results, but they were pot-committed: we were supposed to run the training on March 15 and I canceled on March 13 due to worries that if I traveled to Nova Scotia, I wouldn't be able to re-enter Prince Edward Island. I was off on that by only one week. :)

Otherwise, our plans to travel to Europe in September have disintegrated along with several weeks of on-site client visits. This has led to starting work with one new client remotely (but who knows where they will go?) and renewed interest in building new online training content.

One thing is certain: I will not start a podcast. You're welcome.

I'm trying to see this disruption as an opportunity to try hybrid models of self-study and real-time training. If I could wave my magic wand, I'd have a few clients who spend a handful of hours per month with me in some combination of 1:1 coaching and pair-work, but otherwise subject their people to some self-study training for the fundamentals. I got to experiment last year with two clients who took my World's Best Intro to TDD training course before I got there to do a more in-depth technical excellence workshop. I'd like to have more of those kinds of relationships: don't pay me big money for the fundamentals; but rather pay me big money for the "real stuff". Has anyone else tried to do this? Anything to report?

I'm also starting to write again. Part of me feels like I ought to have something new to write about, but the rest of me understands that many people weren't listening the last time, so there's little harm in writing about it again. I might do it much better this time.

Finally, I have a vague feeling like I'd like to fall in love with programming again, but everything is broken and nobody seems to mind. Elm is the closest I've come to finding a programming environment that I actually like. I'd love to know what other people have experienced in this general direction.

There. Whew. Thanks. Stay safe and stay away from each other, unless you're in Sweden, in which case stay away from vulnerable people.
--
J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: https://tdd.training :: http://www.jbrains.ca :: http://www.thecodewhisperer.com


George Dinwiddie
 

Joe, et al,

On 5/5/20 5:11 PM, J. B. Rainsberger wrote:
Hi, folks. I'm so glad to see occasional-but-furious discussion here. (I mean "furious" in a good way.) Thank you.
I'm curious how things have changed for you during this global disruption in sharing physical space. Tell stories!
I did a bunch of remote mobbing, virtual workshops, and other online gatherings to see what was available for online work. I'm still not sure how to apply these tools to team and organizational coaching. I depend heavily on seeing things that seem normal to the organization and they don't notice. I depend heavily on putting provocative things up on the wall and seeing the reactions. These are starting points for coaching conversations that I don't know how to fully replicate in the online world.

I thought I had a budding remote coaching gig almost sold (to a company that was already distributed), but as you say, they've rolled up to protect themselves. In fact, the CIO said his budget was cut so much he's having to lay some people off. <sigh/> Another fully remote training/coaching gig was stillborn. I do have one contract-training gig in the works, using their curriculum which they've adapted from in-person to remote. It will be an experiment for all concerned.

In the mean time, I have virtually no income. After some soul-searching, I decided to apply for Social Security benefits. I'm "full retirement age" this month, so it's not as bad a choice as it could be. I'd planned to wait another 4 years to maximize the benefits, but it seems prudent to have some small steady income. I did the math and the break-even point for cumulative benefits would be another 11 years after waiting 4, i.e. 15 years from now. Yes, the benefits would be 32% greater, but that's still less than $1000/month difference. As it is, the SSA benefit will pay my monthly mortgage (after they process the application in 3 or 4 months). And that's not a bad thing. It still feel weird.

Still no intention to retire in any other sense. I've had a feeling for the last year or two that another big shift was coming in my life/career, and I guess this is forcing that. These are interesting times.

I'm trying to see this disruption as an opportunity to try hybrid
models of self-study and real-time training.
I've also been thinking about remote training models. Without the travel to on-site, it seems silly to try to cram things into full days. And with the friction of remote work, seems counter-productive. I think there are better models waiting to be fleshed out.

I'm open to collaborating with others. Perhaps remotely together we can do more than working alone. Reach out with your ideas. (So far I've written a article with Lisa Crispin.)

- George


I moved one physical training session (2 days) into Zoomland and the result did not thrill me. We did well enough with what we had, but I definitely did not like losing the ability to wander around the room and look over people's shoulders to ask questions. I think they felt OK with the results, but they were pot-committed: we were supposed to run the training on March 15 and I canceled on March 13 due to worries that if I traveled to Nova Scotia, I wouldn't be able to re-enter Prince Edward Island. I was off on that by only one week. :)
Otherwise, our plans to travel to Europe in September have disintegrated along with several weeks of on-site client visits. This has led to starting work with one new client remotely (but who knows where they will go?) and renewed interest in building new online training content.
One thing is certain: I will not start a podcast. You're welcome.
I'm trying to see this disruption as an opportunity to try hybrid models of self-study and real-time training. If I could wave my magic wand, I'd have a few clients who spend a handful of hours per month with me in some combination of 1:1 coaching and pair-work, but otherwise subject their people to some self-study training for the fundamentals. I got to experiment last year with two clients who took my World's Best Intro to TDD training course before I got there to do a more in-depth technical excellence workshop. I'd like to have more of those kinds of relationships: don't pay me big money for the fundamentals; but rather pay me big money for the "real stuff". Has anyone else tried to do this? Anything to report?
I'm also starting to write again. Part of me feels like I ought to have something new to write about, but the rest of me understands that many people weren't listening the last time, so there's little harm in writing about it again. I might do it much better this time.
Finally, I have a vague feeling like I'd like to fall in love with programming again, but everything is broken and nobody seems to mind. Elm is the closest I've come to finding a programming environment that I actually like. I'd love to know what other people have experienced in this general direction.
There. Whew. Thanks. Stay safe and stay away from each other, unless you're in Sweden, in which case stay away from vulnerable people.
--
J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: https://tdd.training :: http://www.jbrains.ca :: http://www.thecodewhisperer.com
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
* George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
Consultant and Coach
----------------------------------------------------------------------


JeffGrigg
 

It sure seems to me like running the IDE in a cloud-based Virtual Machine, which the different typists connect to would be ideal.

But, of course, "your mileage may vary."


On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 5:59 PM Dave Nicolette <davenicolette@...> wrote:
...
I'm dockerizing IntelliJ IDEA for my next remote mob session, and I
want to try floobits. That setup, if it works well, would enable
participants to commit to github without the "mob" tool. We'll see how
it goes. So far, dockerizing IntelliJ IDEA has been a pain, and
running it in the container has been approximately 14x slower than
running it on my laptop. This does not bode well. But we'll see. The
other option is to have everyone configure their own IntelliJ instance
consistent with the mob project. That's far from ideal.

...


Dave Nicolette
 

I agree a single cloud-based IDE would be ideal. Maybe we'll get
there. I haven't set something like that up before, so I have to take
one step at a time and learn as I go.

On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 6:23 PM JeffGrigg <jeffreytoddgrigg@gmail.com> wrote:

It sure seems to me like running the IDE in a cloud-based Virtual Machine, which the different typists connect to would be ideal.

But, of course, "your mileage may vary."


On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 5:59 PM Dave Nicolette <davenicolette@gmail.com> wrote:

...
I'm dockerizing IntelliJ IDEA for my next remote mob session, and I
want to try floobits. That setup, if it works well, would enable
participants to commit to github without the "mob" tool. We'll see how
it goes. So far, dockerizing IntelliJ IDEA has been a pain, and
running it in the container has been approximately 14x slower than
running it on my laptop. This does not bode well. But we'll see. The
other option is to have everyone configure their own IntelliJ instance
consistent with the mob project. That's far from ideal.

...


Michal Svoboda
 

Jeff Langr wrote:
The net: they all suck in their own special way.
Hello Jeff,

I find good old VNC very useful (e.g. tigervnc which is multiplatform,
free/libre/oss). You can tunnel it over SSH to add to the security
aspect. Multiple connections (i.e. pairing, mobbing) are supported, as
well as remote screen control. You can couple it with any telephony
software to add voice/video.

A few years back we used it extensively to do remote pairing, for
several months, and there was no discomfort whatsoever. I use it to this
day to access remote workstations.

Michal


Larry Brunelle
 

FWIW:

Currently, in our house, we use VNC (for entirely another purpose)
and it works well enough. Years ago, with a DSL connection 1.5 down
(and a great deal less up), I used the NoMachine product to control
a work machine from my house (Linux-Linux), and it was pretty much
like being there. Regrettably, "upgrades/improvements" seem to
have made it actually less good, but the open-source FreeNX version
may still have all the old virtues. The big differentiator at the
time was far better compression than anything else, and it was (and
remains) as secure as running over SSH can make it.

Years before THAT, editing between Richardson, TX and RTP, running
against a repo server in RTP, gave common view through one Emacs
or another, with only the caveat that each editing person did have
to save for the other guy to refresh and see it. Only sightly
clunky (and spectacular for ~1997), and the view speed was
functionally instantaneous. One could collaborate on the phone,
and we did code reviews this way.

I'm the first to agree that no such solution is the same as being
in the same room viewing the same (or a mirrored) monitor, but
experience shows that people who have their own motivations to
collaborate usually can do so sufficiently, and those who don't,
well, they don't.


Michal Svoboda wrote:

Jeff Langr wrote:
The net: they all suck in their own special way.
Hello Jeff,
I find good old VNC very useful (e.g. tigervnc which is multiplatform,
free/libre/oss). You can tunnel it over SSH to add to the security
aspect. Multiple connections (i.e. pairing, mobbing) are supported, as
well as remote screen control. You can couple it with any telephony
software to add voice/video.
A few years back we used it extensively to do remote pairing, for
several months, and there was no discomfort whatsoever. I use it to this
day to access remote workstations.
Michal


Jeff Langr
 

Hi Michal,

At Outpace (c.2013-2016), we did VNC for screen share. For coding via screen control, we generally did found discomfort--a little, i.e. enough to be mildly off-putting after a while--when trying to edit via the other person's GUI  IDE. (Yes in small chunks it's acceptable.)

So we ended up using tmux (tmate, really, hosted internally for security) and collaborative editing using a character mode editor (vim & emacs). That worked well--no character lag--particularly when coupled with screen share, but in most shops you can't expect most devs to be able to (or want to) do that.

Jeff


Michal Svoboda wrote on 5/6/20 12:02 AM:

Jeff Langr wrote:
The net: they all suck in their own special way.
Hello Jeff,

I find good old VNC very useful (e.g. tigervnc which is multiplatform,
free/libre/oss). You can tunnel it over SSH to add to the security
aspect. Multiple connections (i.e. pairing, mobbing) are supported, as
well as remote screen control. You can couple it with any telephony
software to add voice/video.

A few years back we used it extensively to do remote pairing, for
several months, and there was no discomfort whatsoever. I use it to this
day to access remote workstations.

Michal



Dave Nicolette
 

Regarding text-based editors, I think a stumbling block to making that a mainstream practice is that people depend heavily on certain features of high-end IDEs to help them work with large legacy code bases, and that seems to be the majority of the work these days as opposed to greenfield development. IDEs like IntelliJ IDEA, Eclipse, and VisualStudio offer a lot of help with finding things in a large, convoluted project directory structure, and with doing basic refactorings safely. Depending on what the work looks like, those features could be worth the annoyance of a little lag during editing. So it's possible the choice of tooling is informed in part by the nature of the work. 


On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 6:52 AM Jeff Langr <jeff@...> wrote:
Hi Michal,

At Outpace (c.2013-2016), we did VNC for screen share. For coding via screen control, we generally did found discomfort--a little, i.e. enough to be mildly off-putting after a while--when trying to edit via the other person's GUI  IDE. (Yes in small chunks it's acceptable.)

So we ended up using tmux (tmate, really, hosted internally for security) and collaborative editing using a character mode editor (vim & emacs). That worked well--no character lag--particularly when coupled with screen share, but in most shops you can't expect most devs to be able to (or want to) do that.

Jeff


Michal Svoboda wrote on 5/6/20 12:02 AM:
Jeff Langr wrote:
The net: they all suck in their own special way.
Hello Jeff,

I find good old VNC very useful (e.g. tigervnc which is multiplatform,
free/libre/oss). You can tunnel it over SSH to add to the security
aspect. Multiple connections (i.e. pairing, mobbing) are supported, as
well as remote screen control. You can couple it with any telephony
software to add voice/video.

A few years back we used it extensively to do remote pairing, for
several months, and there was no discomfort whatsoever. I use it to this
day to access remote workstations.

Michal



John Welty
 

Nice update J. B., thanks. 

These changing times have caused an increase demand on me to provide better tooling for remote support and training. This had been the focus of my ongoing projects but the timeline was shortened. As it turned out, the timing was good as we (my new co-worker and myself) seem to have been ready to begin delegating. We have a couple of local developers that I learned about when interviewing for my request to get assistance from the Iowa Startup Accelerator program. So far so good. 

At the same time I'm exploring augmented reality solutions to help with supporting coiled metal processing machinery remotely. We tried Chalk from VuForia but ended up focusing on the Microsoft Dynamics Remote Assist Mobile. This was also something I'd had in the works since last year when I placed a pre-order for the HoloLens2 in November but those still haven't arrived so we're going with a smart phone app version instead. Again... so far so good. 

The third branch that I'm diving into is to launch a self hosted install of Canvas (Instructure) in the cloud to provide a home for training materials that can be used for in-house technical training as well as end user training with self paced multi-media courses that can have access to experts through course focused instructor discussions and chats. I'm seeing a lot of promise in using a platform like that to package these materials up. 

Sorry to hear our chances of meeting up again in Europe have been dashed!

Warmest regards,

--John


Rob Park
 

I've worked remotely a lot over the years with varied amounts of pairing, from off and on (like now) to full-time. For a long time, Screenhero was the goto thing (although it was no video)... until Slack killed it (or least the great experience it had been). But now the same creator is working on screen.so. I've only tried that once so far. It felt like a WIP but moving in the direction of a newer, better Screenhero (with video). 

At the moment, I still recommend Zoom for pairing & sharing. You should be prepared that remote control is not exactly the same.  For those looking to have more of a classroom setting, you might try being creative with breakout rooms. You can pair up participants in their rooms and drop in on them to help out for example. And Miro is still for me the best online whiteboard with lots of templates and options for collaboration. And yes, I'm very IDE-focused w/ everything Jetbrains (but VS Code also looks great).

Others I've worked with in the past have been liking Tuple but the pricing model has always seemed out of whack.

FWIW, I'd recommend you bring patience and perhaps a good sense of humor.

@robpark

P.S. The biggest struggle I've found in the past was with some of the mega-corps not permitting certain tools ... we've worked with what they supported, but I've never recommended any of these (e.g. Skype for Business)

On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 9:52 AM Jeff Langr <jeff@...> wrote:
Hi Michal,

At Outpace (c.2013-2016), we did VNC for screen share. For coding via screen control, we generally did found discomfort--a little, i.e. enough to be mildly off-putting after a while--when trying to edit via the other person's GUI  IDE. (Yes in small chunks it's acceptable.)

So we ended up using tmux (tmate, really, hosted internally for security) and collaborative editing using a character mode editor (vim & emacs). That worked well--no character lag--particularly when coupled with screen share, but in most shops you can't expect most devs to be able to (or want to) do that.

Jeff


Michal Svoboda wrote on 5/6/20 12:02 AM:
Jeff Langr wrote:
The net: they all suck in their own special way.
Hello Jeff,

I find good old VNC very useful (e.g. tigervnc which is multiplatform,
free/libre/oss). You can tunnel it over SSH to add to the security
aspect. Multiple connections (i.e. pairing, mobbing) are supported, as
well as remote screen control. You can couple it with any telephony
software to add voice/video.

A few years back we used it extensively to do remote pairing, for
several months, and there was no discomfort whatsoever. I use it to this
day to access remote workstations.

Michal



Avi Kessner
 

Hi James Grenning.
That Dojo dashboard is amazing.
Is it available for sale anywhere? I could really use something like that for helping to train our teams and even remote meetups.


brought to you by the letters A, V, and I
and the number 47


On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 12:26 AM James Grenning <james@...> wrote:

Hi Joe

I've done 28 remote delivered courses over the last 5+ years. 5 this year. I use a customized cyber-dojo server for my training exercise server (remote or on-site). I can see every time someone presses the test button. Live is better as you can look over a shoulder too.

Here is the cyber-dojo dashboard with Red/Green/Amber (fail/pass/broken build). Click a traffic light and see the difference from the last test press. I'd be happy to give you a tour if you have not seen it.

I'm also working on my teachable content still. I like the idea of learning the basics before a trip so the client can dig deeper.

Cheers, James


James Grenning - Author of TDD for Embedded C - wingman-sw.com/tddec
wingman-sw.com
wingman-sw.com/blog
twitter.com/jwgrenning
facebook.com/wingman.sw
wingman software

On 5 May 2020, at 17:11, J. B. Rainsberger wrote:

Hi, folks. I'm so glad to see occasional-but-furious discussion here. (I mean "furious" in a good way.) Thank you.

I'm curious how things have changed for you during this global disruption in sharing physical space. Tell stories!

I moved one physical training session (2 days) into Zoomland and the result did not thrill me. We did well enough with what we had, but I definitely did not like losing the ability to wander around the room and look over people's shoulders to ask questions. I think they felt OK with the results, but they were pot-committed: we were supposed to run the training on March 15 and I canceled on March 13 due to worries that if I traveled to Nova Scotia, I wouldn't be able to re-enter Prince Edward Island. I was off on that by only one week. :)

Otherwise, our plans to travel to Europe in September have disintegrated along with several weeks of on-site client visits. This has led to starting work with one new client remotely (but who knows where they will go?) and renewed interest in building new online training content.

One thing is certain: I will not start a podcast. You're welcome.

I'm trying to see this disruption as an opportunity to try hybrid models of self-study and real-time training. If I could wave my magic wand, I'd have a few clients who spend a handful of hours per month with me in some combination of 1:1 coaching and pair-work, but otherwise subject their people to some self-study training for the fundamentals. I got to experiment last year with two clients who took my World's Best Intro to TDD training course before I got there to do a more in-depth technical excellence workshop. I'd like to have more of those kinds of relationships: don't pay me big money for the fundamentals; but rather pay me big money for the "real stuff". Has anyone else tried to do this? Anything to report?

I'm also starting to write again. Part of me feels like I ought to have something new to write about, but the rest of me understands that many people weren't listening the last time, so there's little harm in writing about it again. I might do it much better this time.

Finally, I have a vague feeling like I'd like to fall in love with programming again, but everything is broken and nobody seems to mind. Elm is the closest I've come to finding a programming environment that I actually like. I'd love to know what other people have experienced in this general direction.

There. Whew. Thanks. Stay safe and stay away from each other, unless you're in Sweden, in which case stay away from vulnerable people.
--


Avi Kessner
 

I work in a remote company, and I find that the best way to mob or pair is to have one person do a screen share and everybody else looks at that screen and talks to each other as that person types.
When it's time to switch keyboards, commit the code, push it to git, and have the other person share their screen and pull the code.
I find all the fancy tools to not work as well.

When I did training, I would have each share their screen and I would watch on "Brady bunch" mode in google meets, flicking between screens. It was exhausting for me but otherwise worked well, especially since everyone was able to learn from eachother's mistakes easier.

brought to you by the letters A, V, and I
and the number 47


On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 5:18 PM Rob Park <robert.d.park@...> wrote:
I've worked remotely a lot over the years with varied amounts of pairing, from off and on (like now) to full-time. For a long time, Screenhero was the goto thing (although it was no video)... until Slack killed it (or least the great experience it had been). But now the same creator is working on screen.so. I've only tried that once so far. It felt like a WIP but moving in the direction of a newer, better Screenhero (with video). 

At the moment, I still recommend Zoom for pairing & sharing. You should be prepared that remote control is not exactly the same.  For those looking to have more of a classroom setting, you might try being creative with breakout rooms. You can pair up participants in their rooms and drop in on them to help out for example. And Miro is still for me the best online whiteboard with lots of templates and options for collaboration. And yes, I'm very IDE-focused w/ everything Jetbrains (but VS Code also looks great).

Others I've worked with in the past have been liking Tuple but the pricing model has always seemed out of whack.

FWIW, I'd recommend you bring patience and perhaps a good sense of humor.

@robpark

P.S. The biggest struggle I've found in the past was with some of the mega-corps not permitting certain tools ... we've worked with what they supported, but I've never recommended any of these (e.g. Skype for Business)

On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 9:52 AM Jeff Langr <jeff@...> wrote:
Hi Michal,

At Outpace (c.2013-2016), we did VNC for screen share. For coding via screen control, we generally did found discomfort--a little, i.e. enough to be mildly off-putting after a while--when trying to edit via the other person's GUI  IDE. (Yes in small chunks it's acceptable.)

So we ended up using tmux (tmate, really, hosted internally for security) and collaborative editing using a character mode editor (vim & emacs). That worked well--no character lag--particularly when coupled with screen share, but in most shops you can't expect most devs to be able to (or want to) do that.

Jeff


Michal Svoboda wrote on 5/6/20 12:02 AM:
Jeff Langr wrote:
The net: they all suck in their own special way.
Hello Jeff,

I find good old VNC very useful (e.g. tigervnc which is multiplatform,
free/libre/oss). You can tunnel it over SSH to add to the security
aspect. Multiple connections (i.e. pairing, mobbing) are supported, as
well as remote screen control. You can couple it with any telephony
software to add voice/video.

A few years back we used it extensively to do remote pairing, for
several months, and there was no discomfort whatsoever. I use it to this
day to access remote workstations.

Michal



Jeff Langr
 

+1 to Avi's contention.

"Git handover" eliminates the concern about other peoples' choice of IDE and keyboard shortcuts, it eliminates the lag annoyance, it's free, and it eliminates the specific problem I had with zoom in that it doesn't transmit Cmd-/ (you can choose to use their keyboard, however).

The open source tool, https://github.com/remotemobprogramming/mob, simplifies the handover process to a couple shell commands (`mob next` and `mob start`, pretty much).

If you want to try git handover in a remote mob environment (and get a demo--you can just watch, too), join my Friday public mob sessions ("PubMob"). We have about a half dozen regular folks so far and work on meaty exercises so far. No costs, no obligations, no worries... relax and have a homebrew.

Regards,
Jeff


Avi Kessner wrote on 5/6/20 9:46 AM:

I work in a remote company, and I find that the best way to mob or pair is to have one person do a screen share and everybody else looks at that screen and talks to each other as that person types.
When it's time to switch keyboards, commit the code, push it to git, and have the other person share their screen and pull the code.
I find all the fancy tools to not work as well.

When I did training, I would have each share their screen and I would watch on "Brady bunch" mode in google meets, flicking between screens. It was exhausting for me but otherwise worked well, especially since everyone was able to learn from eachother's mistakes easier.

brought to you by the letters A, V, and I
and the number 47


On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 5:18 PM Rob Park <robert.d.park@...> wrote:
I've worked remotely a lot over the years with varied amounts of pairing, from off and on (like now) to full-time. For a long time, Screenhero was the goto thing (although it was no video)... until Slack killed it (or least the great experience it had been). But now the same creator is working on screen.so. I've only tried that once so far. It felt like a WIP but moving in the direction of a newer, better Screenhero (with video). 

At the moment, I still recommend Zoom for pairing & sharing. You should be prepared that remote control is not exactly the same.  For those looking to have more of a classroom setting, you might try being creative with breakout rooms. You can pair up participants in their rooms and drop in on them to help out for example. And Miro is still for me the best online whiteboard with lots of templates and options for collaboration. And yes, I'm very IDE-focused w/ everything Jetbrains (but VS Code also looks great).

Others I've worked with in the past have been liking Tuple but the pricing model has always seemed out of whack.

FWIW, I'd recommend you bring patience and perhaps a good sense of humor.

@robpark

P.S. The biggest struggle I've found in the past was with some of the mega-corps not permitting certain tools ... we've worked with what they supported, but I've never recommended any of these (e.g. Skype for Business)

On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 9:52 AM Jeff Langr <jeff@...> wrote:
Hi Michal,

At Outpace (c.2013-2016), we did VNC for screen share. For coding via screen control, we generally did found discomfort--a little, i.e. enough to be mildly off-putting after a while--when trying to edit via the other person's GUI  IDE. (Yes in small chunks it's acceptable.)

So we ended up using tmux (tmate, really, hosted internally for security) and collaborative editing using a character mode editor (vim & emacs). That worked well--no character lag--particularly when coupled with screen share, but in most shops you can't expect most devs to be able to (or want to) do that.

Jeff


Michal Svoboda wrote on 5/6/20 12:02 AM:
Jeff Langr wrote:
The net: they all suck in their own special way.
Hello Jeff,

I find good old VNC very useful (e.g. tigervnc which is multiplatform,
free/libre/oss). You can tunnel it over SSH to add to the security
aspect. Multiple connections (i.e. pairing, mobbing) are supported, as
well as remote screen control. You can couple it with any telephony
software to add voice/video.

A few years back we used it extensively to do remote pairing, for
several months, and there was no discomfort whatsoever. I use it to this
day to access remote workstations.

Michal




George Dinwiddie
 

Avi,

Go to https://cyber-dojo.org/ and click "we're in a group."

- George

On 5/6/20 11:41 AM, Avi Kessner wrote:
Hi James Grenning.
That Dojo dashboard is amazing.
Is it available for sale anywhere? I could really use something like that for helping to train our teams and even remote meetups.
brought to you by the letters A, V, and I
and the number 47
On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 12:26 AM James Grenning <james@wingman-sw.com <mailto:james@wingman-sw.com>> wrote:
__
Hi Joe
I've done 28 remote delivered courses over the last 5+ years. 5 this
year. I use a customized cyber-dojo server for my training exercise
server (remote or on-site). I can see every time someone presses the
test button. Live is better as you can look over a shoulder too.
Here is the cyber-dojo dashboard with Red/Green/Amber
(fail/pass/broken build). Click a traffic light and see the
difference from the last test press. I'd be happy to give you a tour
if you have not seen it.
I'm also working on my teachable content still. I like the idea of
learning the basics before a trip so the client can dig deeper.
Cheers, James
------------------------------------------------------------------------
James Grenning - Author of TDD for Embedded C - wingman-sw.com/tddec
<http://wingman-sw.com/tddec>
wingman-sw.com <http://wingman-sw.com>
wingman-sw.com/blog <http://wingman-sw.com/blog>
twitter.com/jwgrenning <http://twitter.com/jwgrenning>
facebook.com/wingman.sw <http://facebook.com/wingman.sw>
wingman software <http://wingman-sw.com>
On 5 May 2020, at 17:11, J. B. Rainsberger wrote:
Hi, folks. I'm so glad to see occasional-but-furious discussion
here. (I mean "furious" in a good way.) Thank you.
I'm curious how things have changed for you during this global
disruption in sharing physical space. Tell stories!
I moved one physical training session (2 days) into Zoomland and
the result did not thrill me. We did well enough with what we
had, but I definitely did not like losing the ability to wander
around the room and look over people's shoulders to ask
questions. I think they felt OK with the results, but they were
pot-committed: we were supposed to run the training on March 15
and I canceled on March 13 due to worries that if I traveled to
Nova Scotia, I wouldn't be able to re-enter Prince Edward
Island. I was off on that by only one week. :)
Otherwise, our plans to travel to Europe in September have
disintegrated along with several weeks of on-site client visits.
This has led to starting work with one new client remotely (but
who knows where they will go?) and renewed interest in building
new online training content.
One thing is certain: I will not start a podcast. You're welcome.
I'm trying to see this disruption as an opportunity to try
hybrid models of self-study and real-time training. If I could
wave my magic wand, I'd have a few clients who spend a handful
of hours per month with me in some combination of 1:1 coaching
and pair-work, but otherwise subject their people to some
self-study training for the fundamentals. I got to experiment
last year with two clients who took my World's Best Intro to TDD
training course before I got there to do a more in-depth
technical excellence workshop. I'd like to have more of those
kinds of relationships: don't pay me big money for the
fundamentals; but rather pay me big money for the "real stuff".
Has anyone else tried to do this? Anything to report?
I'm also starting to write again. Part of me feels like I ought
to have something new to write about, but the rest of me
understands that many people weren't listening the last time, so
there's little harm in writing about it again. I might do it
much better this time.
Finally, I have a vague feeling like I'd like to fall in love
with programming again, but everything is broken and nobody
seems to mind. Elm is the closest I've come to finding a
programming environment that I actually like. I'd love to know
what other people have experienced in this general direction.
There. Whew. Thanks. Stay safe and stay away from each other,
unless you're in Sweden, in which case stay away from vulnerable
people.
--
J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: https://tdd.training ::
http://www.jbrains.ca :: http://www.thecodewhisperer.com
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
* George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
Consultant and Coach
----------------------------------------------------------------------


Avi Kessner
 

Really great website. Thanks!
brought to you by the letters A, V, and I
and the number 47


On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 9:14 PM George Dinwiddie <lists@...> wrote:
Avi,

Go to https://cyber-dojo.org/ and click "we're in a group."

  - George

On 5/6/20 11:41 AM, Avi Kessner wrote:
> Hi James Grenning.
> That Dojo dashboard is amazing.
> Is it available for sale anywhere? I could really use something like
> that for helping to train our teams and even remote meetups.
>
>
> brought to you by the letters A, V, and I
> and the number 47
>
>
> On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 12:26 AM James Grenning <james@...
> <mailto:james@...>> wrote:
>
>     __
>
>     Hi Joe
>
>     I've done 28 remote delivered courses over the last 5+ years. 5 this
>     year. I use a customized cyber-dojo server for my training exercise
>     server (remote or on-site). I can see every time someone presses the
>     test button. Live is better as you can look over a shoulder too.
>
>     Here is the cyber-dojo dashboard with Red/Green/Amber
>     (fail/pass/broken build). Click a traffic light and see the
>     difference from the last test press. I'd be happy to give you a tour
>     if you have not seen it.
>
>     I'm also working on my teachable content still. I like the idea of
>     learning the basics before a trip so the client can dig deeper.
>
>     Cheers, James
>
>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>     James Grenning - Author of TDD for Embedded C - wingman-sw.com/tddec
>     <http://wingman-sw.com/tddec>
>     wingman-sw.com <http://wingman-sw.com>
>     wingman-sw.com/blog <http://wingman-sw.com/blog>
>     twitter.com/jwgrenning <http://twitter.com/jwgrenning>
>     facebook.com/wingman.sw <http://facebook.com/wingman.sw>
>     wingman software <http://wingman-sw.com>
>
>     On 5 May 2020, at 17:11, J. B. Rainsberger wrote:
>
>         Hi, folks. I'm so glad to see occasional-but-furious discussion
>         here. (I mean "furious" in a good way.) Thank you.
>
>         I'm curious how things have changed for you during this global
>         disruption in sharing physical space. Tell stories!
>
>         I moved one physical training session (2 days) into Zoomland and
>         the result did not thrill me. We did well enough with what we
>         had, but I definitely did not like losing the ability to wander
>         around the room and look over people's shoulders to ask
>         questions. I think they felt OK with the results, but they were
>         pot-committed: we were supposed to run the training on March 15
>         and I canceled on March 13 due to worries that if I traveled to
>         Nova Scotia, I wouldn't be able to re-enter Prince Edward
>         Island. I was off on that by only one week. :)
>
>         Otherwise, our plans to travel to Europe in September have
>         disintegrated along with several weeks of on-site client visits.
>         This has led to starting work with one new client remotely (but
>         who knows where they will go?) and renewed interest in building
>         new online training content.
>
>         One thing is certain: I will not start a podcast. You're welcome.
>
>         I'm trying to see this disruption as an opportunity to try
>         hybrid models of self-study and real-time training. If I could
>         wave my magic wand, I'd have a few clients who spend a handful
>         of hours per month with me in some combination of 1:1 coaching
>         and pair-work, but otherwise subject their people to some
>         self-study training for the fundamentals. I got to experiment
>         last year with two clients who took my World's Best Intro to TDD
>         training course before I got there to do a more in-depth
>         technical excellence workshop. I'd like to have more of those
>         kinds of relationships: don't pay me big money for the
>         fundamentals; but rather pay me big money for the "real stuff".
>         Has anyone else tried to do this? Anything to report?
>
>         I'm also starting to write again. Part of me feels like I ought
>         to have something new to write about, but the rest of me
>         understands that many people weren't listening the last time, so
>         there's little harm in writing about it again. I might do it
>         much better this time.
>
>         Finally, I have a vague feeling like I'd like to fall in love
>         with programming again, but everything is broken and nobody
>         seems to mind. Elm is the closest I've come to finding a
>         programming environment that I actually like. I'd love to know
>         what other people have experienced in this general direction.
>
>         There. Whew. Thanks. Stay safe and stay away from each other,
>         unless you're in Sweden, in which case stay away from vulnerable
>         people.
>         --
>         J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: https://tdd.training ::
>         http://www.jbrains.ca :: http://www.thecodewhisperer.com
>
>

--
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------
   * George Dinwiddie *                      http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
   Software Development                    http://www.idiacomputing.com
   Consultant and Coach
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------





James Grenning
 

Avi, I do a lot of custom exercise start points and run my own servers.  If any of you want a demo,  I'd be happy to give a tour. 


On May 6, 2020 at 4:11 PM, Avi Kessner <akessner@...> wrote:

Really great website. Thanks!
brought to you by the letters A, V, and I
and the number 47


On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 9:14 PM George Dinwiddie <lists@...> wrote:
Avi,

Go to https://cyber-dojo.org/ and click "we're in a group."

  - George

On 5/6/20 11:41 AM, Avi Kessner wrote:
> Hi James Grenning.
> That Dojo dashboard is amazing.
> Is it available for sale anywhere? I could really use something like
> that for helping to train our teams and even remote meetups.
>
>
> brought to you by the letters A, V, and I
> and the number 47
>
>
> On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 12:26 AM James Grenning <james@...
> <mailto:james@...>> wrote:
>
>     __
>
>     Hi Joe
>
>     I've done 28 remote delivered courses over the last 5+ years. 5 this
>     year. I use a customized cyber-dojo server for my training exercise
>     server (remote or on-site). I can see every time someone presses the
>     test button. Live is better as you can look over a shoulder too.
>
>     Here is the cyber-dojo dashboard with Red/Green/Amber
>     (fail/pass/broken build). Click a traffic light and see the
>     difference from the last test press. I'd be happy to give you a tour
>     if you have not seen it.
>
>     I'm also working on my teachable content still. I like the idea of
>     learning the basics before a trip so the client can dig deeper.
>
>     Cheers, James
>
>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>     James Grenning - Author of TDD for Embedded C - wingman-sw.com/tddec
>     <http://wingman-sw.com/tddec>
>     wingman-sw.com <http://wingman-sw.com>
>     wingman-sw.com/blog <http://wingman-sw.com/blog>
>     twitter.com/jwgrenning <http://twitter.com/jwgrenning>
>     facebook.com/wingman.sw <http://facebook.com/wingman.sw>
>     wingman software <http://wingman-sw.com>
>
>     On 5 May 2020, at 17:11, J. B. Rainsberger wrote:
>
>         Hi, folks. I'm so glad to see occasional-but-furious discussion
>         here. (I mean "furious" in a good way.) Thank you.
>
>         I'm curious how things have changed for you during this global
>         disruption in sharing physical space. Tell stories!
>
>         I moved one physical training session (2 days) into Zoomland and
>         the result did not thrill me. We did well enough with what we
>         had, but I definitely did not like losing the ability to wander
>         around the room and look over people's shoulders to ask
>         questions. I think they felt OK with the results, but they were
>         pot-committed: we were supposed to run the training on March 15
>         and I canceled on March 13 due to worries that if I traveled to
>         Nova Scotia, I wouldn't be able to re-enter Prince Edward
>         Island. I was off on that by only one week. :)
>
>         Otherwise, our plans to travel to Europe in September have
>         disintegrated along with several weeks of on-site client visits.
>         This has led to starting work with one new client remotely (but
>         who knows where they will go?) and renewed interest in building
>         new online training content.
>
>         One thing is certain: I will not start a podcast. You're welcome.
>
>         I'm trying to see this disruption as an opportunity to try
>         hybrid models of self-study and real-time training. If I could
>         wave my magic wand, I'd have a few clients who spend a handful
>         of hours per month with me in some combination of 1:1 coaching
>         and pair-work, but otherwise subject their people to some
>         self-study training for the fundamentals. I got to experiment
>         last year with two clients who took my World's Best Intro to TDD
>         training course before I got there to do a more in-depth
>         technical excellence workshop. I'd like to have more of those
>         kinds of relationships: don't pay me big money for the
>         fundamentals; but rather pay me big money for the "real stuff".
>         Has anyone else tried to do this? Anything to report?
>
>         I'm also starting to write again. Part of me feels like I ought
>         to have something new to write about, but the rest of me
>         understands that many people weren't listening the last time, so
>         there's little harm in writing about it again. I might do it
>         much better this time.
>
>         Finally, I have a vague feeling like I'd like to fall in love
>         with programming again, but everything is broken and nobody
>         seems to mind. Elm is the closest I've come to finding a
>         programming environment that I actually like. I'd love to know
>         what other people have experienced in this general direction.
>
>         There. Whew. Thanks. Stay safe and stay away from each other,
>         unless you're in Sweden, in which case stay away from vulnerable
>         people.
>         --
>         J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: https://tdd.training ::
>         http://www.jbrains.ca :: http://www.thecodewhisperer.com
>
>

--
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------
   * George Dinwiddie *                      http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
   Software Development                    http://www.idiacomputing.com
   Consultant and Coach
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------





Lars Eckart
 

hello Joe,
 
I've been part in Jeff's pubmob sessions and would like to second the opinion that the mob tool (https://mob.sh/) works really well. Especially when people come together regularly and know what to do, handing over with the tool and swapping the driver is blazing fast.
 
During March, Woody Zuill had several remote mob programming introduction sessions. I think I participated in almost half of them, as it's been so much fun. We used cyber-dojo there as it's easy to get started with total strangers and takes away all environment setup differences/issues. I've even contributed and got the java projects to JDK 14 :-)
 
Regarding screen sharing, I'm using https://tuple.app/ since last November already and it's for me the best way of remote pairing. The person sharing notices nothing, and the guest has just enough functionality to draw focus to certain areas on the screen, or if necessary can even take control and type without delay (at least I don't notice any). Downside for some/many might be that it is currently only available for macOS.
 
Attending online trainings: There was a lot of free content during March&April (e.g. pluralsight's free month) before people now started offering their trainings in a remote setting. When I heard that craft-conf is postponed and I won't be able to attend (I had a ticket for your workshop Joe), I was immediately looking into spending my training budget on the Surviving Legacy Code online course instead, but our company has frozen all training expenses for now. Still very tempted to buy it from my own pocket but I should first work through some other materials I've recently purchased. And then I'm also very eagerly waiting for The World's Best Intro to TDD, Level 2. It's coming, right? The "Relieve Excessive Mocking" article was a great read and I think it was mentioned there that there will be a Level 2.
 
Greetings from Estonia,
Lars


Jeff Langr
 

hi Lars,

> Regarding screen sharing, I'm using https://tuple.app/ since last November already and it's for me the best way of remote pairing.

I think it's one of the few solutions I've not tried yet. Would the tool adapt well to remote mobbing also? (I know almost nothing about it.)

Would you have time for a short session to pair?

Jeff


Lars Eckart via groups.io wrote on 5/12/20 3:52 PM:

hello Joe,
 
I've been part in Jeff's pubmob sessions and would like to second the opinion that the mob tool (https://mob.sh/) works really well. Especially when people come together regularly and know what to do, handing over with the tool and swapping the driver is blazing fast.
 
During March, Woody Zuill had several remote mob programming introduction sessions. I think I participated in almost half of them, as it's been so much fun. We used cyber-dojo there as it's easy to get started with total strangers and takes away all environment setup differences/issues. I've even contributed and got the java projects to JDK 14 :-)
 

 
Attending online trainings: There was a lot of free content during March&April (e.g. pluralsight's free month) before people now started offering their trainings in a remote setting. When I heard that craft-conf is postponed and I won't be able to attend (I had a ticket for your workshop Joe), I was immediately looking into spending my training budget on the Surviving Legacy Code online course instead, but our company has frozen all training expenses for now. Still very tempted to buy it from my own pocket but I should first work through some other materials I've recently purchased. And then I'm also very eagerly waiting for The World's Best Intro to TDD, Level 2. It's coming, right? The "Relieve Excessive Mocking" article was a great read and I think it was mentioned there that there will be a Level 2.
 
Greetings from Estonia,
Lars


Lars Eckart
 

hello Jeff,

I just tried it out with 2 colleagues. Looks like it's not meant for mobbing (yet). You can have multiple observers, but the moment you're 3 or more, the first guest loses the ability to type on the host's screen, only drawing still works then, and the observers cannot do anything but look.

And yes, I'm up for a demo. I'll send you a DM on twitter, perhaps Friday before pubmob.

Lars