[espeak-ng:master] reported: Add Tolkien’s Elvish languages #github


espeak-ng@groups.io Integration <espeak-ng@...>
 

[espeak-ng:master] New Comment on Pull Request #981 Add Tolkien’s Elvish languages
By lucaswerkmeister:

You can define new phoneme as sequence of two existing ones and assign IPA name to it, if necessary. See more at Phoneme tables.

Thanks, but how do I define a sequence of two phonemes? I couldn’t figure it out. I tried two CALLs now –

diff --git a/dictsource/qya_rules b/dictsource/qya_rules
index 2ac2bbec..7133447f 100644
--- a/dictsource/qya_rules
+++ b/dictsource/qya_rules
@@ -77,7 +77,7 @@
 	L02) ht	Ct
 	L03) ht	xt
 	hl	l#
-	hr	hR
+	hr	R#
 	hw	w#
 	hy	C
 
diff --git a/phsource/ph_quenya b/phsource/ph_quenya
index 6a2c7374..8b9d5cdf 100644
--- a/phsource/ph_quenya
+++ b/phsource/ph_quenya
@@ -11,6 +11,12 @@ phoneme O
   FMT(vowel/oo)
 endphoneme
 
+phoneme R#
+  ipa r̥
+  CALL base1/h
+  CALL base1/R
+endphoneme
+
 phoneme w#
   vls glt apr  // [h]
   ipa ʍ

– but it just sounds identical to h, I don’t hear any trace of the R. (Two import_phonemes gives a build error.)


espeak-ng@groups.io Integration <espeak-ng@...>
 

[espeak-ng:master] New Comment on Pull Request #981 Add Tolkien’s Elvish languages
By valdisvi:

There is no phoneme hR defined in espeak-ng. Therefore what actually happening is hR is pronunciated as two following phonemes h and R, which in IPA are shown as h and r. You can define new phoneme as sequence of two existing ones and assign IPA name to it, if necessary. See more at Phoneme tables.


espeak-ng@groups.io Integration <espeak-ng@...>
 

[espeak-ng:master] New Comment on Pull Request #981 Add Tolkien’s Elvish languages
By Flameborn:

First of all, thank you very much for adding this.

... the latter pronounces ⟨i⟩ in the texts as /i/, whereas I believe it should be /ɪ/).

The consensus is that the vowel i is pronounced as in hit or sick, however, there are some exceptions. Word-initial i is usually a /j/, this is the same as in compound names, such as Dóriath ˈdorjaθ, except in shorter words, like im.

But there are further exceptions, for example Minastirith is usually pronounced as having short /ɪ/ vowels, but the i in tirith is closer to what's in Fingon /ˈfiŋɡon/ (revised from Finweg, from the Quenya Findekáno).

Where applicable, I would add suggested changes from Neo-Sindarin, a great source is A Fan's Guide to Neo-Sindarin by Fiona Jallings or loosely from A Gateway to Sindarin (though a bit dated, and not exactly Neo-Sindarin) by David Salo. Although Neo-Sindarin is a bit more liberal, it tries to unify some things that weren't in Tolkien's works and notes. But of course this is up to you.