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OT: Farms and technology - was ISO-Bus (CAN-Bus)

Gordon Haverland
 

Hackaday had a looooooong thread on what John Deere was doing in 2015
with screwing up tractors. I am almost finished that thread, and so
far nothing remotely useful to me.

We can make biodiesel on the farm. It is possible to make good
biodiesel and bad biodiesel. Biodiesel contains oxygen. It is
possible to make green-diesel from bio-diesel, but not currently on the
farm (maybe sonochemistry will provide a solution?). Green-diesel
doesn't contain oxygen, and has been approved (for some feedstocks) as
a replacement for jet-fuel. I believe all Tier IV diesel tractor
emission systems limit biodiesel to 20 or 25%.

So, even though farmers can sequester carbon; we are not allowed to use
farm grown fuel to power our diesel tractors. We have to send money to
the big oil companies in Donald Trump Land (DTL) who need to satisfy
their shareholders with ever increasing profits (and hence ever
increasing prices for diesel).

An alternative fuel for diesels is dimethyl ether (DME). It to, can be
made on farm. Diesel (biodiesel, green-diesel, ...) have lubricatng
properties. DME has no lubricating properties. Which is a real
problem for the fuel pump and injectors. Let's say someone builds a
new set of fuel pumps and injectors, where the surface layer is
something like diamond and tungsten disulfide. So, the surface is
tremendously hard, and has self-lubricity. So, maybe the lack of
lubricity of DME can be gotten around.

We have lots of experience at tuning diesel engines running diesel fuel;
we have almost no experience tuning diesel engines running DME. So,
maybe this is a path to designing an engine for farmers, using farm
produced fuels?

I think the Canadian military is interested in DME diesels, in part for
patrolling the arctic.

For those interested, DME is two methyl groups, bridged by an oxygen
(the oxygen bridge is what ethers are about). So, like bio-diesel; it
is a partially oxygenated fuel source.

--

Gord

Rene Matthijssen
 

Ever since John Deere started "prohibiting" farmers from fixing their own tractors, they haven't been doing well.
You can't sell a product and then claim that you're retaining ownership as a company.
Rene


On 2019-07-31 7:18 p.m., Gordon Haverland wrote:
Hackaday had a looooooong thread on what John Deere was doing in 2015
with screwing up tractors.  I am almost finished that thread, and so
far nothing remotely useful to me.

Frederick R. McDougall
 

It is not just JD.  All diesel engine companies have the same policies --- only we can fix your engine (and transmissions, air conditioners, and ...) unless your technician has been trained by us and pays the fees (I would like another word but fear their lawyers) for their computer systems.  Owners have bought nothing.

My rant
Fred

On Wed., Jul. 31, 2019, 19:35 Rene Matthijssen, <rene@...> wrote:
Ever since John Deere started "prohibiting" farmers from fixing their own tractors, they haven't been doing well.
You can't sell a product and then claim that you're retaining ownership as a company.
Rene


On 2019-07-31 7:18 p.m., Gordon Haverland wrote:
Hackaday had a looooooong thread on what John Deere was doing in 2015
with screwing up tractors.  I am almost finished that thread, and so
far nothing remotely useful to me.

Rene Matthijssen
 

And thanks to the internet, people are wising up and finding ways around this extortion. You can now buy do-it-yourself gadgets to do your own repairs and people {unrelated to JD) are offering their services. However, JD is taking them to court.
It he meantime their sales and stock are tanking, as they say on the internet: Go woke - go broke.
Rene


On 2019-07-31 7:59 p.m., Frederick R. McDougall wrote:
It is not just JD.  All diesel engine companies have the same policies --- only we can fix your engine (and transmissions, air conditioners, and ...) unless your technician has been trained by us and pays the fees (I would like another word but fear their lawyers) for their computer systems.  Owners have bought nothing.

My rant
Fred

Rene Matthijssen
 

Hello Gordon,
It is admirable to see your varied interest in different projects. May I suggest that you post pictures once they're completed so that others might be encouraged to venture into new activities as well.
Rene



On 2019-07-31 7:18 p.m., Gordon Haverland wrote:
Hackaday had a looooooong thread on what John Deere was doing in 2015
with screwing up tractors.  I am almost finished that thread, and so
far nothing remotely useful to me.

We can make biodiesel on the farm.  It is possible to make good
biodiesel and bad biodiesel.  Biodiesel contains oxygen.  It is
possible to make green-diesel from bio-diesel, but not currently on the
farm (maybe sonochemistry will provide a solution?).  Green-diesel
doesn't contain oxygen, and has been approved (for some feedstocks) as
a replacement for jet-fuel.  I believe all Tier IV diesel tractor
emission systems limit biodiesel to 20 or 25%.

So, even though farmers can sequester carbon; we are not allowed to use
farm grown fuel to power our diesel tractors.  We have to send money to
the big oil companies in Donald Trump Land (DTL) who need to satisfy
their shareholders with ever increasing profits (and hence ever
increasing prices for diesel).

An alternative fuel for diesels is dimethyl ether (DME).  It to, can be
made on farm.  Diesel (biodiesel, green-diesel, ...) have lubricatng
properties.  DME has no lubricating properties.  Which is a real
problem for the fuel pump and injectors.  Let's say someone builds a
new set of fuel pumps and injectors, where the surface layer is
something like diamond and tungsten disulfide.  So, the surface is
tremendously hard, and has self-lubricity.  So, maybe the lack of
lubricity of DME can be gotten around.

We have lots of experience at tuning diesel engines running diesel fuel;
we have almost no experience tuning diesel engines running DME.  So,
maybe this is a path to designing an engine for farmers, using farm
produced fuels?

I think the Canadian military is interested in DME diesels, in part for
patrolling the arctic.

For those interested, DME is two methyl groups, bridged by an oxygen
(the oxygen bridge is what ethers are about).  So, like bio-diesel; it
is a partially oxygenated fuel source.