Topics

Managed switches (Ubiquiti)

Gordon Haverland
 

I now have a managed switch, but haven't tried to insert it yet. Maybe
I should do some reading first?

I am kind of wondering what "CPU" is in a Unifi Swith 8 60W. I am not
seeing an answer, but I think a little birdy said it is an ASIC.

There is a person who set up a UniDi network at home, which looks to be
a good reference.

https://www.douglasisaksson.com/lessons-learned-from-deploying-a-unifi-network-at-home/

In there, he talks about a "cloud key". There are many cloud keys (at
unifi), apparently is it uc-ck that is wanted. This "key" is what
adopts all your UniFi stuff, and I gather you just end up talking to
the one controller.

Ubiquiti stuff isn't necessarily fast. Having an ASIC running N paths
doing switching can be blazing fast. Having an ASIC emulate a Z80 to
do non-hardware assisted switching duties will (probably) be a dog. I
have no idea how Ubiquiti does non-hardware assisted CPU intensive
stuff.

Some guy at ArsTechnica ran a bunch of Ubiquiti stuff at home for 3
years.

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2018/07/enterprise-wi-fi-at-home-part-two-reflecting-on-almost-three-years-with-pro-gear/

I suspect two of the smaller managed switches that Ubiquiti sells are
both 8 port switches. One has 8 RJ45 and can provide 60W of POE. The
other has 8 RJ45 and 2 SFP, and can provide 150W of POE.

It is about 40% more to get those two SFP ports and 90W more of POE.

As I understand things (which may not be correct), those SFP ports can
take copper or fibre optic cable. So, if you wanted to send data from
places at different electrical potential, optical would be needed.
Optical can also carry the signal further. There might be other
consequences.

It may be that this 150W unit has more oompf, I don't know.

--

Gord

Andrew Stott
 

You'll need to install some kind of unifi controller to manage that switch. You don't need to buy the cloud key to do it. You can run it on Debian or the like. You can't manage the Unifi switches from the command line - needs to all be done through the webui (runs on port 8443, not just 443 so the first time you connect make sure you add the :8443 to the url). The Edge switch line can be managed via command line.

Setting up VLans in the Unifi webui is a bit confusing - the Crosstalk Solutions and Lawrence Systems YouTube channels have some good videos on the Unifi line of gear which include howtos.

You can get fiber or copper SFPs depending on your requirements.

Andrew

-----Original Message-----
From: elug@groups.io <elug@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon Haverland via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2019 3:45 PM
To: Edmonton Linux Users Group <elug@groups.io>
Subject: [elug] Managed switches (Ubiquiti)

I now have a managed switch, but haven't tried to insert it yet. Maybe I should do some reading first?

I am kind of wondering what "CPU" is in a Unifi Swith 8 60W. I am not seeing an answer, but I think a little birdy said it is an ASIC.

There is a person who set up a UniDi network at home, which looks to be a good reference.

https://www.douglasisaksson.com/lessons-learned-from-deploying-a-unifi-network-at-home/

In there, he talks about a "cloud key". There are many cloud keys (at unifi), apparently is it uc-ck that is wanted. This "key" is what adopts all your UniFi stuff, and I gather you just end up talking to the one controller.

Ubiquiti stuff isn't necessarily fast. Having an ASIC running N paths doing switching can be blazing fast. Having an ASIC emulate a Z80 to do non-hardware assisted switching duties will (probably) be a dog. I have no idea how Ubiquiti does non-hardware assisted CPU intensive stuff.

Some guy at ArsTechnica ran a bunch of Ubiquiti stuff at home for 3 years.

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2018/07/enterprise-wi-fi-at-home-part-two-reflecting-on-almost-three-years-with-pro-gear/

I suspect two of the smaller managed switches that Ubiquiti sells are both 8 port switches. One has 8 RJ45 and can provide 60W of POE. The other has 8 RJ45 and 2 SFP, and can provide 150W of POE.

It is about 40% more to get those two SFP ports and 90W more of POE.

As I understand things (which may not be correct), those SFP ports can take copper or fibre optic cable. So, if you wanted to send data from places at different electrical potential, optical would be needed.
Optical can also carry the signal further. There might be other consequences.

It may be that this 150W unit has more oompf, I don't know.

--

Gord

Gordon Haverland
 

On Sun, 22 Dec 2019 00:06:05 +0000
"Andrew Stott" <andrew@...> wrote:

You'll need to install some kind of unifi controller to manage that
switch. You don't need to buy the cloud key to do it. You can run
it on Debian or the like. You can't manage the Unifi switches from
the command line - needs to all be done through the webui (runs on
port 8443, not just 443 so the first time you connect make sure you
add the :8443 to the url). The Edge switch line can be managed via
command line.
I am wading through a ubnt thread, about Debian problems. Page 2 of
8. I suspect that this particular problem is fixed in the thread
somewhere. But, if seems like this cloud key is less likely to have a
similar problem.

I am not going to do anything with the router and installing this UniFi
switch immediately downstream of it until the Pinebook Pro laptop and
other stuff (cloud key, small UPS for the router and switch and maybe
POE injector for Ubiquiti PTP) arrives.

Setting up VLans in the Unifi webui is a bit confusing - the
Crosstalk Solutions and Lawrence Systems YouTube channels have some
good videos on the Unifi line of gear which include howtos.
I don't normally look at youtube. I suppose I might have to. I find
little information about planning VLANs. I was hoping someone might
have a thing at CPAN to plan VLANs, but nothing.

The idea is to put the Archer C7 in the garage, which does both 2.4 and
5 GHz. Maybe the best thing is to just NOT enable wifi on the router in
my room. Which is what I did with the existing/current router.

You can get fiber or copper SFPs depending on your requirements.
I've never installed fibre, but I do know it exists.

Thanks.

--

Gord

Andrew Stott
 

You should be able to power that ubiquiti PTP radio from that Unifi switch so you could save a 120V outlet by bypassing the POE injector. It will doe both 802.3AF as well as whatever the passive one is - be careful with 24V Passive POE because it will cook your device you plug in it if isn't setup for it. The magic blue smoke will come out.

The first gen cloud keys are notorious for corrupting their system files if they are not shut down gracefully. The Gen2 ones are quite a bit more but apparently have a battery in them to allow them to shut down gracefully.

I guess I was running my controller on Ubuntu, not Debian. I didn't have any issues with it - ran it at work the same was as well.

You will need something to route between VLANs if you want traffic to go across them - something like pfsense has no issues doing that (router on a stick is an option as well). I'm currently running Untangle on a Celeron powered industrial PC here for my firewall/routing needs.

Andrew

-----Original Message-----
From: elug@groups.io <elug@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon Haverland via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2019 5:39 PM
To: elug@groups.io
Subject: Re: [elug] Managed switches (Ubiquiti)

On Sun, 22 Dec 2019 00:06:05 +0000
"Andrew Stott" <andrew@...> wrote:

You'll need to install some kind of unifi controller to manage that
switch. You don't need to buy the cloud key to do it. You can run it
on Debian or the like. You can't manage the Unifi switches from the
command line - needs to all be done through the webui (runs on port
8443, not just 443 so the first time you connect make sure you add the
:8443 to the url). The Edge switch line can be managed via command
line.
I am wading through a ubnt thread, about Debian problems. Page 2 of 8. I suspect that this particular problem is fixed in the thread somewhere. But, if seems like this cloud key is less likely to have a similar problem.

I am not going to do anything with the router and installing this UniFi switch immediately downstream of it until the Pinebook Pro laptop and other stuff (cloud key, small UPS for the router and switch and maybe POE injector for Ubiquiti PTP) arrives.

Setting up VLans in the Unifi webui is a bit confusing - the Crosstalk
Solutions and Lawrence Systems YouTube channels have some good videos
on the Unifi line of gear which include howtos.
I don't normally look at youtube. I suppose I might have to. I find little information about planning VLANs. I was hoping someone might have a thing at CPAN to plan VLANs, but nothing.

The idea is to put the Archer C7 in the garage, which does both 2.4 and
5 GHz. Maybe the best thing is to just NOT enable wifi on the router in my room. Which is what I did with the existing/current router.

You can get fiber or copper SFPs depending on your requirements.
I've never installed fibre, but I do know it exists.

Thanks.

--

Gord

Gordon Haverland
 

On Sun, 22 Dec 2019 00:06:05 +0000
"Andrew Stott" <andrew@...> wrote:

Setting up VLans in the Unifi webui is a bit confusing - the
Crosstalk Solutions and Lawrence Systems YouTube channels have some
good videos on the Unifi line of gear which include howtos.
I just finished reading a blog entry by Troy Hunt on Ubiquiti. Could
be an advertisement for the praise. But, in there he talks about Guest
access on wifi, and one of the other things I've read about Ubiquiti is
that you should stay away from Guest access. Could be one person got
an early device, and Troy got a later device.

--

Gord