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Linux Beginner

Howard Traxler
 

Hello Group,
I've been asking all over, and I hope I haven't already asked here:

I would like to set up a linux machine and would appreciate a little guidance.

I've downloaded a recent version of ubuntu but have not installed it on anything yet.  I'm thinking of using an older machine that now has windows 98 or XP.  I also have a couple older machines that hav DOS 6.2.  All those machines have IDE ports for their hard drives and I have many of those old drives.

Can someone please tell me the requirements of a computer to load ubuntu?  Maybe even suggest the procedure to get me started.

Thank you very much.

Howard Traxler

Joan Leach
 

According to Distrowatch.com, I read Ubuntu had stopped 32-bit support. So I'd try Anti-X or Puppy Linux, perhaps others will have other suggestions. RoboLinux might work, too.

Joan in Reno

On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 09:39:41 AM PST, Howard Traxler <htraxler7@...> wrote:


Hello Group,
I've been asking all over, and I hope I haven't already asked here:

I would like to set up a linux machine and would appreciate a little
guidance.

I've downloaded a recent version of ubuntu but have not installed it on
anything yet.  I'm thinking of using an older machine that now has
windows 98 or XP.  I also have a couple older machines that hav DOS
6.2.  All those machines have IDE ports for their hard drives and I have
many of those old drives.

Can someone please tell me the requirements of a computer to load
ubuntu?  Maybe even suggest the procedure to get me started.

Thank you very much.

Howard Traxler



Hank Quinlan
 
Edited

Hello, the desktop environment of ubuntu will most likely be too much for an old machine.

I'm not sure how familiar you are with the different flavours of linux, but there are lightweight versions of ubuntu, ones that use much lighter desktops

I'm currently running xubuntu on a Dell Inspiron 530 from like the mid 2000's (i'm guessing 2ghz with 1 gig ram) and it runs very well.

As Joan commented, Puppy Linux will be lightening fast on an old machine.  I ran it on an machine from 1998 and it still bloody fast, i just prefer the ubuntu flavours if possible.

I would recommend trying 'live' usb version before doing a full install just to get a feel.

EDIT: you can still get 32 bit versions for xubuntu

Also, i have tried Kubuntu, which runs KDE desktop environment, but i find the xfce of xubuntu runs very nicely!  (a very popular penetrating OS, kali linux, recently  changed their DE to xfce!)

William Henderson aka Slackrat
 

"Joan Leach" <jleach728@...> writes:

Don't feed the Trolls

--
William Henderson
aka Slackrat
http://billh.sdf.org/slackware.jpg

Joan Leach
 

Excuse me, but this senior citizen knows of no trolls out of my favorite books and movies. I still have my MS-DOS, Win 3.11 up to Win 7 PCs, plus lots of Linux I've installed on various hard drives. So, how is a Linux user being a troll by trying to help another?

Joan in Reno

On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 04:48:42 PM PST, William Henderson aka Slackrat <billh@...> wrote:


"Joan Leach" <jleach728@...> writes:

Don't  feed the Trolls

--
William Henderson
aka Slackrat
http://billh.sdf.org/slackware.jpg



Howard Traxler
 

Thanks to both of yous who wrote, but I really don't have any idea where to start.  So I probably have to download one of these linux distributions from somewhere and put it on a CD or thumb drive.  Then take it to a target machine; upon which I have low-level formatted and partitioned the hard drive; then start the linux install executable.  This all assumes that there is a USB port or CD drive on the target machine.

30 years ago, when I was in school, I got a little familiar with unix commands but never had to do anything with linux.  I'm really green and may have to be spoon fed (s they say) each command and/or procedure.

Howard

On 12/5/2019 7:48 PM, Joan Leach wrote:
Excuse me, but this senior citizen knows of no trolls out of my favorite books and movies. I still have my MS-DOS, Win 3.11 up to Win 7 PCs, plus lots of Linux I've installed on various hard drives. So, how is a Linux user being a troll by trying to help another?

Joan in Reno

On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 04:48:42 PM PST, William Henderson aka Slackrat <billh@...> wrote:


"Joan Leach" <jleach728@...> writes:

Don't  feed the Trolls

--
William Henderson
aka Slackrat
http://billh.sdf.org/slackware.jpg




o1bigtenor
 

On Fri, Dec 6, 2019 at 8:46 AM Howard Traxler <htraxler7@...> wrote:

Thanks to both of yous who wrote, but I really don't have any idea where to start. So I probably have to download one of these linux distributions from somewhere and put it on a CD or thumb drive. Then take it to a target machine; upon which I have low-level formatted and partitioned the hard drive; then start the linux install executable. This all assumes that there is a USB port or CD drive on the target machine.
I am definitely no computer genius but the 'modern' system installer
takes very very little 'knowledge'.

30 years ago, when I was in school, I got a little familiar with unix commands but never had to do anything with linux. I'm really green and may have to be spoon fed (s they say) each command and/or procedure.
I might want to persuade you to use Debian as imo Ubuntu is really
working at straying from the open source straight line but that's
something that isn't that hard to change down the line either.
O modern installer just needs to be pointed at (older system without
uefi is far easier to set up than a newer one with imo) the system and
then you tell it to do a graphical install.
If your machine was current some time between 2010 to 12 until around
2016 (I htink that was when the uefi stuff really took off) there
isn't much you need to do.
There are a mountain of options - - - pick the simplest one and inside
of 35 to 45 minutes you have a working system. I would suggest even
just using a net-install version if you want to do an install.
There are also live-cd (better dvd) images when you boot to the disc
and the system runs off the disc - - - haven't tried so am not sure
how work gets saved but a great way to try things.
I've learned most of my linux stuff the hard way - - - most of my
difficulties have been due to my choices and sometimes due to using a
very unusual physical system.

Jump in - - - the waters fine - - - if you do this on a second system
you can always ask for help using the box that is working (grin!).

Regards

Joan Leach
 

Remember you have to be able to burn an iso, which are Linux LiveCDs/LiveDVDs or bootable USB drives. A lot of BIOS' on PC motherboards did not allow for booting from USB. Plus, many times the boot up list has to be adjusted, so CD is before hard drive.

I like Puppy because it can run in RAM, so I can pull it out and watch a DVD if I want to. Also comes in handy when Windows won't boot and you need to mount the hard drive to read or copy files off.

Here's the link to Distrowatch search list:

Puppy Linux selected , so you can read the linked the reviews:

Plop Linux isn't on the list, but it allows you to boot from USB when the BIOS does not.

Joan in Reno

On Friday, December 6, 2019, 06:46:46 AM PST, Howard Traxler <htraxler7@...> wrote:


Thanks to both of yous who wrote, but I really don't have any idea where to start.  So I probably have to download one of these linux distributions from somewhere and put it on a CD or thumb drive.  Then take it to a target machine; upon which I have low-level formatted and partitioned the hard drive; then start the linux install executable.  This all assumes that there is a USB port or CD drive on the target machine.

30 years ago, when I was in school, I got a little familiar with unix commands but never had to do anything with linux.  I'm really green and may have to be spoon fed (s they say) each command and/or procedure.

Howard

On 12/5/2019 7:48 PM, Joan Leach wrote:
Excuse me, but this senior citizen knows of no trolls out of my favorite books and movies. I still have my MS-DOS, Win 3.11 up to Win 7 PCs, plus lots of Linux I've installed on various hard drives. So, how is a Linux user being a troll by trying to help another?

Joan in Reno

On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 04:48:42 PM PST, William Henderson aka Slackrat <billh@...> wrote:


"Joan Leach" <jleach728@...> writes:

Don't  feed the Trolls

--
William Henderson
aka Slackrat
http://billh.sdf.org/slackware.jpg




Gordon Haverland
 

On Thu, 5 Dec 2019 11:39:33 -0600
"Howard Traxler" <htraxler7@...> wrote:

I've downloaded a recent version of ubuntu but have not installed it
on anything yet.  I'm thinking of using an older machine that now has
windows 98 or XP.  I also have a couple older machines that hav DOS
6.2.  All those machines have IDE ports for their hard drives and I
have many of those old drives.
You have a couple of concerns (possibly more). If all of these
machines have CD-ROM drives, perhaps the place to start is to download
a variety of "Live CD" Linux images and see if they boot. If you can
boot a Live CD, you should be able to install that same distribution.

This Live CDs are set up under assemptions, especially on the hardware
side. So, it may be that none of them will boot on a machine with IDE
hardware, or if it does boot it doesn't recognize the IDE hardware.
This doesn't necessarily mean you can get it running, it may be more
work.

--

Gord

Rick Forges
 

If I recall , I it seems some installers won't recognize or partition IDE drive. But if you get fdisk to do the partitioning the installer will do the rest. 


On Sun, Dec 8, 2019, 7:18 PM Gordon Haverland, <ghaverla@...> wrote:
On Thu, 5 Dec 2019 11:39:33 -0600
"Howard Traxler" <htraxler7@...> wrote:

> I've downloaded a recent version of ubuntu but have not installed it
> on anything yet.  I'm thinking of using an older machine that now has
> windows 98 or XP.  I also have a couple older machines that hav DOS
> 6.2.  All those machines have IDE ports for their hard drives and I
> have many of those old drives.

You have a couple of concerns (possibly more).  If all of these
machines have CD-ROM drives, perhaps the place to start is to download
a variety of "Live CD" Linux images and see if they boot.  If you can
boot a Live CD, you should be able to install that same distribution.

This Live CDs are set up under assemptions, especially on the hardware
side.  So, it may be that none of them will boot on a machine with IDE
hardware, or if it does boot it doesn't recognize the IDE hardware.
This doesn't necessarily mean you can get it running, it may be more
work.

--

Gord