Date   
Re: OT: Out of country call forwarding

Bart Oleksy
 

Another option is for her to bring her (carrier-unlocked) phone along to Australia and buy a new SIM card there with the package of calling/texting/data that she needs.  This is what I've done before when traveling abroad, usually for shorter time periods but most prepaid packages are good for a month or more anyway.


Hope that helps!


From: elug@groups.io <elug@groups.io> on behalf of John Hanley <linux@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2016 3:03 PM
To: elug@groups.io
Subject: [elug] Out of country call forwarding
 

My sister-in-law is heading to Australia for a month. She would like some kind of inexpensive way to still send/receive a few phone calls and texts. Right now Telus wants to sell her an $85 package for 75 minutes.

One option I thought of  included  call forward from  her telus number to a local  carrier where she would purchase a SIM card for her iPhone .  Another option I thought of  included  a local Skype  number  where she would have calls forwarded to .

Does anyone have any thoughts or recommendations for an out of country calling solution?

Thanks!
John

Re: OT: Out of country call forwarding

Keehan Dowd
 

I've made a couple trips to Australia this last year...   Skype has no local numbers in Canada, so you can by a US Skype number and forward you Canadian phone to it and then use Skype on the Australian end, but you'll still need data (cellular or wifi) anyway, so as Bart mentions, you'd probably be best just grabbing a local phone with a pre-paid SIM.   I bought a Samsung J1 for $89 (a low-end android handset) and a $50 pre-paid SIM which gave me 30 days of unlimited in-country calling, unlimited texting and 8GB of data and then I used Skype and WhatsApp on the handset to talk/message back here to Canada.  http://www.optus.com.au/shop/mobile/prepaid/plans   Optus is about the best bang per dollar when it comes to pre-paid plans.  There are many other carriers if you want to shop around.

I'd be happy to loan my J1 handset if she just wants to buy her own SIM there to save a few dollars.  I don't use it here in Canada.

Regards,
Keehan.

On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 3:06 PM, Bart Oleksy <BARTO@...> wrote:

Another option is for her to bring her (carrier-unlocked) phone along to Australia and buy a new SIM card there with the package of calling/texting/data that she needs.  This is what I've done before when traveling abroad, usually for shorter time periods but most prepaid packages are good for a month or more anyway.


Hope that helps!


From: elug@groups.io <elug@groups.io> on behalf of John Hanley <linux@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2016 3:03 PM
To: elug@groups.io
Subject: [elug] Out of country call forwarding
 

My sister-in-law is heading to Australia for a month. She would like some kind of inexpensive way to still send/receive a few phone calls and texts. Right now Telus wants to sell her an $85 package for 75 minutes.

One option I thought of  included  call forward from  her telus number to a local  carrier where she would purchase a SIM card for her iPhone .  Another option I thought of  included  a local Skype  number  where she would have calls forwarded to .

Does anyone have any thoughts or recommendations for an out of country calling solution?

Thanks!
John


Re: OT: Out of country call forwarding

John Hanley
 

Great suggestion. thanks. Is there a way to call forward calls made to her Canadian number to the Australian number without incurring lots of fees?

John


On Oct 5, 2016 3:31 PM, "Keehan Dowd" <keehan.dowd@...> wrote:
I've made a couple trips to Australia this last year...   Skype has no local numbers in Canada, so you can by a US Skype number and forward you Canadian phone to it and then use Skype on the Australian end, but you'll still need data (cellular or wifi) anyway, so as Bart mentions, you'd probably be best just grabbing a local phone with a pre-paid SIM.   I bought a Samsung J1 for $89 (a low-end android handset) and a $50 pre-paid SIM which gave me 30 days of unlimited in-country calling, unlimited texting and 8GB of data and then I used Skype and WhatsApp on the handset to talk/message back here to Canada.  http://www.optus.com.au/shop/mobile/prepaid/plans   Optus is about the best bang per dollar when it comes to pre-paid plans.  There are many other carriers if you want to shop around.

I'd be happy to loan my J1 handset if she just wants to buy her own SIM there to save a few dollars.  I don't use it here in Canada.

Regards,
Keehan.

On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 3:06 PM, Bart Oleksy <BARTO@...> wrote:

Another option is for her to bring her (carrier-unlocked) phone along to Australia and buy a new SIM card there with the package of calling/texting/data that she needs.  This is what I've done before when traveling abroad, usually for shorter time periods but most prepaid packages are good for a month or more anyway.


Hope that helps!


From: elug@groups.io <elug@groups.io> on behalf of John Hanley <linux@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2016 3:03 PM
To: elug@groups.io
Subject: [elug] Out of country call forwarding
 

My sister-in-law is heading to Australia for a month. She would like some kind of inexpensive way to still send/receive a few phone calls and texts. Right now Telus wants to sell her an $85 package for 75 minutes.

One option I thought of  included  call forward from  her telus number to a local  carrier where she would purchase a SIM card for her iPhone .  Another option I thought of  included  a local Skype  number  where she would have calls forwarded to .

Does anyone have any thoughts or recommendations for an out of country calling solution?

Thanks!
John


Re: OT: Out of country call forwarding

Keehan Dowd
 

That depends on your local carrier.   If it's Telus for example and you forward your number to an Australian number, you'll pay Telus' international rates to Australia.  Keep in mind that in Australia, since the caller pays all call costs, calls to a mobile are a lot more expensive than calls to a landline.  Most (conventional) carrier nowadays are around 5-10 cents/minute to an Aussie landline from here and most discount carriers are less than 2 cents per minute, but to an Aussie mobile phone, that rate can jump to more than 30c/min...which is still cheap compared to a decade or more ago.  :-)

For me, I have Telus at home with unlimited North America, so I bought a Skype-In number in Idaho and forwarded my home to that number.  Then I just carried my Aussie mobile with Skype in Australia and calls from here came in via Skype for about 1c/min.

Keehan.

On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 3:34 PM, John Hanley <linux@...> wrote:

Great suggestion. thanks. Is there a way to call forward calls made to her Canadian number to the Australian number without incurring lots of fees?

John


On Oct 5, 2016 3:31 PM, "Keehan Dowd" <keehan.dowd@...> wrote:
I've made a couple trips to Australia this last year...   Skype has no local numbers in Canada, so you can by a US Skype number and forward you Canadian phone to it and then use Skype on the Australian end, but you'll still need data (cellular or wifi) anyway, so as Bart mentions, you'd probably be best just grabbing a local phone with a pre-paid SIM.   I bought a Samsung J1 for $89 (a low-end android handset) and a $50 pre-paid SIM which gave me 30 days of unlimited in-country calling, unlimited texting and 8GB of data and then I used Skype and WhatsApp on the handset to talk/message back here to Canada.  http://www.optus.com.au/shop/mobile/prepaid/plans   Optus is about the best bang per dollar when it comes to pre-paid plans.  There are many other carriers if you want to shop around.

I'd be happy to loan my J1 handset if she just wants to buy her own SIM there to save a few dollars.  I don't use it here in Canada.

Regards,
Keehan.

On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 3:06 PM, Bart Oleksy <BARTO@...> wrote:

Another option is for her to bring her (carrier-unlocked) phone along to Australia and buy a new SIM card there with the package of calling/texting/data that she needs.  This is what I've done before when traveling abroad, usually for shorter time periods but most prepaid packages are good for a month or more anyway.


Hope that helps!


From: elug@groups.io <elug@groups.io> on behalf of John Hanley <linux@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2016 3:03 PM
To: elug@groups.io
Subject: [elug] Out of country call forwarding
 

My sister-in-law is heading to Australia for a month. She would like some kind of inexpensive way to still send/receive a few phone calls and texts. Right now Telus wants to sell her an $85 package for 75 minutes.

One option I thought of  included  call forward from  her telus number to a local  carrier where she would purchase a SIM card for her iPhone .  Another option I thought of  included  a local Skype  number  where she would have calls forwarded to .

Does anyone have any thoughts or recommendations for an out of country calling solution?

Thanks!
John



Re: OT: Out of country call forwarding

Keehan Dowd
 

Sorry...I had a brain fart.

>Then I just carried my Aussie mobile with Skype in Australia and calls from here came in via Skype for about 1c/min.

There was no cost/minute to receive calls via Skype-In, but there's about a $7/mo Skype charge for the number....and whatever data charges if any you incur at the far end.

On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 3:40 PM, Keehan Dowd <keehan.dowd@...> wrote:
That depends on your local carrier.   If it's Telus for example and you forward your number to an Australian number, you'll pay Telus' international rates to Australia.  Keep in mind that in Australia, since the caller pays all call costs, calls to a mobile are a lot more expensive than calls to a landline.  Most (conventional) carrier nowadays are around 5-10 cents/minute to an Aussie landline from here and most discount carriers are less than 2 cents per minute, but to an Aussie mobile phone, that rate can jump to more than 30c/min...which is still cheap compared to a decade or more ago.  :-)

For me, I have Telus at home with unlimited North America, so I bought a Skype-In number in Idaho and forwarded my home to that number.  Then I just carried my Aussie mobile with Skype in Australia and calls from here came in via Skype for about 1c/min.

Keehan.

On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 3:34 PM, John Hanley <linux@...> wrote:

Great suggestion. thanks. Is there a way to call forward calls made to her Canadian number to the Australian number without incurring lots of fees?

John


On Oct 5, 2016 3:31 PM, "Keehan Dowd" <keehan.dowd@...> wrote:
I've made a couple trips to Australia this last year...   Skype has no local numbers in Canada, so you can by a US Skype number and forward you Canadian phone to it and then use Skype on the Australian end, but you'll still need data (cellular or wifi) anyway, so as Bart mentions, you'd probably be best just grabbing a local phone with a pre-paid SIM.   I bought a Samsung J1 for $89 (a low-end android handset) and a $50 pre-paid SIM which gave me 30 days of unlimited in-country calling, unlimited texting and 8GB of data and then I used Skype and WhatsApp on the handset to talk/message back here to Canada.  http://www.optus.com.au/shop/mobile/prepaid/plans   Optus is about the best bang per dollar when it comes to pre-paid plans.  There are many other carriers if you want to shop around.

I'd be happy to loan my J1 handset if she just wants to buy her own SIM there to save a few dollars.  I don't use it here in Canada.

Regards,
Keehan.

On Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 3:06 PM, Bart Oleksy <BARTO@...> wrote:

Another option is for her to bring her (carrier-unlocked) phone along to Australia and buy a new SIM card there with the package of calling/texting/data that she needs.  This is what I've done before when traveling abroad, usually for shorter time periods but most prepaid packages are good for a month or more anyway.


Hope that helps!


From: elug@groups.io <elug@groups.io> on behalf of John Hanley <linux@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2016 3:03 PM
To: elug@groups.io
Subject: [elug] Out of country call forwarding
 

My sister-in-law is heading to Australia for a month. She would like some kind of inexpensive way to still send/receive a few phone calls and texts. Right now Telus wants to sell her an $85 package for 75 minutes.

One option I thought of  included  call forward from  her telus number to a local  carrier where she would purchase a SIM card for her iPhone .  Another option I thought of  included  a local Skype  number  where she would have calls forwarded to .

Does anyone have any thoughts or recommendations for an out of country calling solution?

Thanks!
John




Charging batteries and "toys"

Gordon Haverland
 

The SkyRC MC3000 is capable of charging a variety of batteries and
chemistries. Although it has 4 slots, it can even be used to charge 2
D cells (they overlap neighbouring cell places, they are so big.

As near as I can tell, if you need to reflash firmware, you must run
Windoze. If you just want to run the charger and have it connected to
a "PC", you can run a couple of different programs, including on
Linux. DataExplorer is a Java program, which knows what a MC3000 is,
and there are all 3 OS versions (Windoze, Mac and Linux - sorry no
BSD, ... unless you hack code I think).

This charger can apparently speak Bluetooth. This charger has a
regular sized USB port (type A?, the rectangle, not the doghouse) set
up for charging only, and a micro B port for data as well. I have an
ancient Firewire/USB 2.0 PCI card (that is brand new). Apparently if
you use the micro B connector, you are supposed to use a very good
cable (and no mini/micro/... adapters). I see that you can get
Bluetooth to USB and Bluetooth to Firewire adapters. Any
recommendations as to which way a person should try and connect this to
Linux?

I have another charger which is either an SkyRC IMAX B6 or a clone of
that. It seems that at least some of the clones are functional, but
they don't follow the same way of doing things that the genuine B6
does. But, calibrating this thing needs a precision voltage source in
the 20-30V range (22.2?) and a balanced resistor network. Any
recomendations on this precision voltage source?

All the connectors for batteries on the B6, were some kind of oddball
connector (JST-XC?). There were 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 battery connectors,
and I just got sets of 3 connectors with pigtail wires at the same
time. But, for a NS connection (such as 4S) to charge N batteries,
there are N black wires and 1 red wire. The red is the most positive?,
and the blacks get connected midway between 2 batteries, except for 1
which is at the "other end" of the red. I guess this is what the RC
battery people are used to.

The reason for all the chargers, is that apparently LiFePO4 batteries
last longest if at 40% charge. The B6 may allow charging to some
specified charge, the MC3000 is supposed to.

But, I think I need to charge these batteries with the computer
connected, so that I have data on each battery (I have 60 LiFePO4
batteries at the moment of dubious parentage).

I hope manufacturers change soonish. This is now the second thing I
have to work with, which has software support only from doze. And the
only doze I have here, is XP.

Toys. I got tired of the neighbour wrecking trees when clearing snow.
So, I now have an Ariens 36 inch snow blower. It has a single, 20 W
halogen light on it. The light more or less points straight ahead.

A halogen lamp puts out a lot of heat. And if I have a light on the
blower, I would like to have a light also illuminating where the snow
is being blown to, not just in front of the blower. So I was thinking
about replacing the halogen with power LEDs, so that I can get more
light and blubs from the same electric source. There is apparently an
alternator in the B&S engine, which is generating power for the lamp
and the hand warmers. There is no battery on the snow blower, so it is
not exactly the same as automotive. Electric start is 120VAC. I did
download the parts manual, which apparently has the wiring diagrams in
it.

Should a person hook this up (or rewire for 3 LED assemblies) with a
battery in the circuit? Lead acid, or something else?

Thanks.

--

Gord

Re: Charging batteries and "toys"

Rene Matthijssen
 

Before anything else, you should figure out the voltage of the halogen light and whether it is AC or DC. Without a battery it could be either.
LED spotlights normally come in 12 and 120 Volt. I just ordered a 15 Watt LED spotlight at a cost of $2.60 each including shipping.
Rene


On 16-10-06 04:46 PM, Gordon Haverland wrote:
Toys.  I got tired of the neighbour wrecking trees when clearing snow.
So, I now have an Ariens 36 inch snow blower.  It has a single, 20 W
halogen light on it.  The light more or less points straight ahead.

A halogen lamp puts out a lot of heat.  And if I have a light on the
blower, I would like to have a light also illuminating where the snow
is being blown to, not just in front of the blower.  So I was thinking
about replacing the halogen with power LEDs, so that I can get more
light and blubs from the same electric source.  There is apparently an
alternator in the B&S engine, which is generating power for the lamp
and the hand warmers.  There is no battery on the snow blower, so it is
not exactly the same as automotive.  Electric start is 120VAC.  I did
download the parts manual, which apparently has the wiring diagrams in
it.

Should a person hook this up (or rewire for 3 LED assemblies) with a
battery in the circuit? Lead acid, or something else?

Thanks.

-- Gord

Re: Charging batteries and "toys"

Gordon Haverland
 

Oh well, I tried to find a reliable USB cable. That seemed much less
expensive than anything involving bluetooth or firewire.

I'll see if I can dig up stories from others on the Internet about
replacing halogen bulbs with LED, to see if they add batteries to act
like big capacitors. I don't think B&S is spending all that much money
on alternators for a snow blower.

--

Gord

OT? Body and Soul Mathematics

Gordon Haverland
 

I happened across a project of sorts, called Body and Soul Mathematics
(bodysoulmath.org). It looks like there are 3 volumes of books
available commercially, and the publisher wants control, so there is
are only snippets of freely available at the project.

At the moment, Volume 4 is not fully revised, and so you can get a
complete volume 4 (400+ pages) for free. This volume is on solving
incompressible fluid flow problems.

Other volumes are planned.

These books revolve around the python supported FEnICS project, and
typically use some kind of Galerkin method for solving problems.
Debian has a fenics package, I assume most other distributions will as
well.

If you have a "big" problem, you might think it nice if you could throw
your GPU at it. Parallel support for fenics is via PetSC (or however
it is capitalised). Something like CUSP? In 2013 the answer was, it
may not be worth it. Today? I don't know.

There is some kind of CUDA support, I didn't look at it. The other
support is OpenCL, which is multi-vendor. Unless you are running the
very top end GPUs, your GPU may only provide single precision floating
point. This doesn't mean it isn't useful, as some algorithms can
handle that. But it probably means you have to build petsc from source
(and the leading edge one), and then maybe build fenics from source.

--

Gord

Re: Charging batteries and "toys"

Rene Matthijssen
 

Although usual, I have seen cases where the starter motor doubled as a battery charger or was it the other way around. And only DC generators should be used with a battery.
Halogen light don't care whether they run on AC or DC, but LED lights do.
Rene


On 16-10-06 10:31 PM, Gordon Haverland wrote:
Oh well, I tried to find a reliable USB cable.  That seemed much less
expensive than anything involving bluetooth or firewire.

I'll see if I can dig up stories from others on the Internet about
replacing halogen bulbs with LED, to see if they add batteries to act
like big capacitors.  I don't think B&S is spending all that much money
on alternators for a snow blower.

-- Gord

Re: Charging batteries and "toys"

Rene Matthijssen
 

Of course I meant: Although unusual......l.,
Rene


O

Re: LED lighting, was Charging batteries and "toys"

Gordon Haverland
 

There are people modifying the halogen lighting on snowblowers.

Some snowblowers have an engine provided alternator, few snowblowers
seem to have batteries. Even though they don't have batteries, some
snowblowers have electric start. They use 120 VAC (extension cord) to
start.

A number of web pages about updating manufacturer supplied lighting
exist. It seems the typical installation is a 20W (or so) halogen
incandescent bulb. Some people replace bulb because it doesn't provide
enough light, or it doesn't provide enough light where they want it.

In any event, a halogen bulb emits a lot of heat, and to replace a
halogen for a LED may run into trouble coming from this much reduced
heat emission.

An incandescent lamp is an extremely inefficient light source.
According to the Wikipedia online encyclopaedia, a 100 watt bulb is
2.1% efficient. In other words, it produces about 2 watts of light
and 98 watts of heat.
A halogen lamp is a bit better. For every 100 watts you put in, you
get about 3.5 watts of light and 96.5 watts of heat.
But, a lot of LED driver systems aren't much better.

The wall-plug efficiency (optical power out divided by electrical
power in) of LED packages is typically in the region of 5-40%,
meaning that somewhere between 60 and 95% of the input power is lost
as heat.
It seems the typical snowblower electrical system is AC. The systems
are claimed to be 12VAC. Honda apparently has a 50W systems in some of
their snowblowers (not the big hybrid one). I believe Ariens is
claiming a 65W system. Handwarmers (if present), are typically in the
20-30W range (so about half the electrical output).

One typical update, is to install a full bridge rectifier. Some people
go on to add capacitors to smooth the rectified current. It isn't
unusual to find people putting in capacitors with a low voltage rating,
and seeing the capacitors blow. With their new DC systems, they add on
pre-packaged LED lamps (probably for 12V systems, even if their system
is nominally 11.1V or so).

For a 20W bulb, we are looking at 20/12=1.67A. If we use diodes to
rectify AC, the 0.6V voltage drop imposes itself twice (and appears as
heat). The rectifier will be producing 2W of heat (about 10%).

A synchronous rectifier (or ideal bridge) seems to be a better way to
rectify 12VAC to power LED replacements for a halogen bulb. Linear
Technology has something (I am sure TI, Maxim, ... do as well) meant
for this. LT4320 in concert with MOSFETs can rectify the 12VAC, and LT
also has a LED driver (LT3755).

One concern I had with the circuits suggested in the datasheet, is that
the current was limited to about 0.6A at 12VAC input, and this
application seems to be almost 2A. I gather with these synchronous
rectifiers, you can put MOSFETs in parallel. Or maybe one just gets a
"bigger" MOSFET?

The (4320) datasheet also talks about adding transient protection. I
am guessing this is strategic placement of Zener diodes?

I had originally thought about just getting dedicated LED drivers.
LEDsupply has "buckpuck" drivers. Cree doesn't seem to sell the
frequency of LED that hits the sweet spot for visual efficiency
(506nm), but as one moves towards 500nm the luminuous efficiency of the
LEDs increases. So perhaps the common green (530nm) LED is good enough?

Among other things, elliptical focus optics are available. The LEDs
themselves can come as one per star, or 3 per star. I was only
thinking of driving them at 1A (max), but if a person gets a 3up
emitter (and so each LED only gets 333 mA), there will be more light
and less heat emitted. The 3up I think are more expensive.

Moving away from halogen and full bridge rectification, we won't make
anywhere near as much heat. Which may mean problems with melting snow
and freezing. The optics seems to be made of polycarbonate, so I guess
a person could get an enclosure with a polycarbonate window. Does
waxing the window make sense?

I am going to bet that these chips only come as surface mount. Is
Schmartboard the best way for a dummy like me to work with these
things? Get 2 boards, one for each chip (probably different boards).
Am I going to want to pot these things?

Speaking of waxing things, it is also recommended to wax the chute on
the snowblower. Crappy Tire knows nothing (sounded like I was
listening to Sargent Schultz of Hogan's Heros). I picked up Meguiars
Gold, which I think gets recommended as mold release in epoxy work.
Anyone know if this is a reasonable choice?

Thanks.

--

Gord

Re: LED lighting, was Charging batteries and "toys"

Rene Matthijssen
 

I'm always in favour of simple solutions.

If the snow blower provides approx, 12 Volt AC, then I would add a standard 6 Amp bridge rectifier, followed by a 12 Volt battery.  No capacitor would be required, the battery will act as a capacitor. To prevent overcharging, some protection will be needed.
I fail to see how heat would be a problem in the winter when blowing snow.  From memory, cold always was my problem.
And the LED spot lights come in "cool white" or 5700- 6500K.
Rene


On 16-10-09 04:24 PM, Gordon Haverland wrote:
Among other things, elliptical focus optics are available.  The LEDs
themselves can come as one per star, or 3 per star.  I was only
thinking of driving them at 1A (max), but if a person gets a 3up
emitter (and so each LED only gets 333 mA), there will be more light
and less heat emitted.   The 3up I think are more expensive.

Moving away from halogen and full bridge rectification, we won't make
anywhere near as much heat.  Which may mean problems with melting snow
and freezing.  The optics seems to be made of polycarbonate, so I guess
a person could get an enclosure with a polycarbonate window.  Does
waxing the window make sense?

I am going to bet that these chips only come as surface mount.  Is
Schmartboard the best way for a dummy like me to work with these
things?  Get 2 boards, one for each chip (probably different boards).
Am I going to want to pot these things?

Speaking of waxing things, it is also recommended to wax the chute on
the snowblower.  Crappy Tire knows nothing (sounded like I was
listening to Sargent Schultz of Hogan's Heros).  I picked up Meguiars
Gold, which I think gets recommended as mold release in epoxy work.
Anyone know if this is a reasonable choice?

Thanks.

-- Gord

Re: LED lighting, was Charging batteries and "toys"

Andrew Stott
 

-----Original Message-----
From: elug@groups.io [mailto:elug@groups.io] On Behalf Of Gordon Haverland
Sent: Sunday, October 09, 2016 4:25 PM
To: elug@groups.io
Subject: Re: [elug] LED lighting, was Charging batteries and "toys"


Speaking of waxing things, it is also recommended to wax the chute on the snowblower. Crappy Tire knows nothing (sounded like I was listening to Sargent Schultz of Hogan's >Heros). I picked up Meguiars Gold, which I think gets recommended as mold release in epoxy work.
Anyone know if this is a reasonable choice?
I've seen suggestions on using kitchen cooking spray to prevent sticking in the chute. I'm on my second blower and have never done anything with the chutes. I can see sticking being a problem when the snow is really wet, but our snow seems to be pretty low on the sticky factor. I wouldn't bother waxing the chute unless you're seeing it clog.

Andrew

Leap Second scheduled

Gordon Haverland
 

It seems this New Years Eve, we have another leap second. Most of the
comments at TheRegister are of a joke variety.

--

Gord

Re: Leap Second scheduled

Maurice Hilarius <mhilarius@...>
 

I guess I will put in my claim for that. 
See :
https://www.google.ca/amp/s/incaelo.wordpress.com/2012/02/29/the-leap-year-saints/amp/

Regards
   Maurice Hilarius


On Oct 11, 2016 08:52, "Gordon Haverland" <ghaverla@...> wrote:
It seems this New Years Eve, we have another leap second.  Most of the
comments at TheRegister are of a joke variety.

--

Gord




Re: LED lighting, was Charging batteries and "toys"

Gordon Haverland
 

On Mon, 10 Oct 2016 03:03:19 +0000
"Andrew Stott" <andrew@...> wrote:
Speaking of waxing things, it is also recommended to wax the chute
on the snowblower. Crappy Tire knows nothing (sounded like I was
listening to Sargent Schultz of Hogan's >Heros). I picked up
Meguiars Gold, which I think gets recommended as mold release in
epoxy work. Anyone know if this is a reasonable choice?
I've seen suggestions on using kitchen cooking spray to prevent
sticking in the chute. I'm on my second blower and have never done
anything with the chutes. I can see sticking being a problem when
the snow is really wet, but our snow seems to be pretty low on the
sticky factor. I wouldn't bother waxing the chute unless you're
seeing it clog.
The blower should be capable of throwing 60 feet. The biggest part of
the driveway, is 30 feet wide. So to clear snow off the windward side,
I need to throw the snow 30 feet just to get to the other side of the
road. Getting it another 30 feet is more useful. If waxing gets me
the distance, I will wax.

Pitty no answer on the surface mount chips and stuff. I'll figure
something out over the winter (and use the light available until then).
Afterwards, I thought that maybe having a yellow LED beacon could be
useful as well, if I am doing other people's driveways.

--

Gord

OT: Television to give away

Roger Walker
 

I’m renovating a room and no longer have room for this.

Sanyo 27” HD ready, with manuals and remote. Works well.

It’s a large, heavy (I’ll help get it into your vehicle), tube style.

I realize it’s not the rage, these days, but I’d rather see it go to someone who will use it, than to the eco-station.

Reply directly, please, not to the group. Thanks.


Roger Walker

Proprietary AMD graphics for Debian

Gordon Haverland
 

It's amazing how time becomes available once snow starts falling. We
are in the middle of our second 6 inch snowfall of the year. Oh
goody! Not.

Anyway, I got a chance to come back to Crimson, the new version of
Catalyst. And all the documentation only talks Catalyst and dates to
2013 or earlier (or so it seems). There were some packages (dpkg-dev,
debhelper, others) which need to be installed, but I seen no mention of.

At this point, dh_install is failing on the absence of some directory
with .../debian/... in its name, under the direction of some Makefile.
I haven't yet figured out if there is a Makefile in what comes in the
file from AMD, but using --keep on the command to not delete
directories after use, I can see that there is no .../debian/...
directories in what this buildpackage thing is doing. There is
a .../Debian/... directory.

In places, the documentation seems to suggest that you cannot BUILD the
package if there is an existing Catalyst (built from AMD or installed
from Debian) installed. Which seems kind of dumb to me. Is the
solution to install a VM, which doesn't have the Catalyst support, and
try to build the package there?

Is there some kind of up to date description of installing Crimson on
Debian around? This is about my third or fourth attempt at looking for
this now. My Google foo is running out of ways to reword search
parameters.

Thanks.

--

Gord

Re: Proprietary AMD graphics for Debian

Gordon Haverland
 

On Fri, 14 Oct 2016 13:12:36 -0700
"Gordon Haverland" <ghaverla@...> wrote:

Anyway, I got a chance to come back to Crimson,
This run file from AMD, supposedly has support for many things, like
Fedora and Ubuntu. The kernel in Debian/stable=jessie is 3.2.0, and
the version of Ubuntu that had a 3.2.0 kernel is precise pangolin.

If I tell this run file to build a package for ubuntu/precise, it
bitches about that not being consistent with "this" environment.

So, I installed vagrant and I am downloading the vagrant box for
jessie64. Maybe that environment will build a package?

--

Gord