Date   
Re: [OT] Rogers to axe Mobilicity, transfer to Chatr

Bart Oleksy
 

That’s definitely a nice thing about Wind (no contracts)!   I was actually looking at the Mobilicity $35/month unlimited deal – last I checked Wind’s was $40/month, but I might not switch to either – depends on how energetic I feel to check into them.  J

 

Bart

 

From: elug@groups.io [mailto:elug@groups.io] On Behalf Of Maurice Hilarius
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2016 6:39 PM
To: elug@groups.io
Subject: Re: [elug] [OT] Rogers to axe Mobilicity, transfer to Chatr

 

Hey,  this is not a risk. Make sure you have an unlocked phone.  Wind is no contract,  so if you are not happy,  say bye bye.  So far they have good service.  I am sending this on Wind right now from Clarke Stadium

On May 11, 2016 1:27 PM, "Bart Oleksy" <BARTO@...> wrote:

I was just mildly debating switching to their $35/month unlimited talk/text/data deal (from Speakout 7-11), but it’s not clear if they will ‘grandfather’ existing plans when the actual switch is made later.  Hmmm…

 

Thanks for the heads-up!

 

Bart

 

From: elug@groups.io [mailto:elug@groups.io] On Behalf Of Keehan Dowd
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2016 1:19 PM
To: elug@groups.io
Subject: Re: [elug] [OT] Rogers to axe Mobilicity, transfer to Chatr

 

Silly mobile linking thingy!   Sorry 'bout that.   Here's the working link:
http://business.financialpost.com/fp-tech-desk/rogers-communications-to-axe-mobilicity-brand-move-customers-to-chatr

Rogers to axe Mobilicity, transfer to Chat

 

 

On Wed, May 11, 2016 at 12:42 PM, Keehan Dowd <keehan.dowd@...> wrote:


Be prepared Wind users....you're next!  (and I say this as a six-year Wind user).  I don't think Wind will be folded, but the service will certainly change under Shaw.

http://digital.edmontonjournal.com/epaper/showlink.aspx?bookmarkid=917WX7LSHGX2&preview=article&linkid=98e9376c-0fb3-49d6-acd4-96d4ea5a7092&pdaffid=kVxEmWDiVrcfl1P8SlNFZA%3d%3d

Regards,
Keehan

 

Re: OT: Just how dumb are us sheep?

Gordon Haverland
 

The lognormal distribution is assymetric, and hence possibilities of
prices much larger than average are larger than prices much smaller
than average. One kind of expects this kind of random pricing to
return better than a constant price, if you can sell the stock I guess.

But, how I was calculating the standard deviation part of the lognormal
was dumb. I was saying the variance in price was a constant. I don't
know, maybe it is. But in this circumstance, the constant used had no
research behind it, and it need not even be close to what happens in
the real world.

One probability distribution which provides an estimate of standard
deviation as a function of size is the Poisson. Normally used for
situations where counting is involved. Sometimes used in other
situations, where some kind of "natural unit" is present, such that the
standard deviation of an estimate of N, is sqrt( N ).

Okay, I plugged something like that in to my formula, and as the penny
is no longer in circulation, I used a nickel as the natural unit. I
also did a run with the penny as the natural unit.

The Poisson distributions for nickels and pennies are quite different,
the penny distribution is much closer to symmetric. On a fractional
basis (all data divided by the mean, which will be the same for the 2
runs), the penny distribution should also be sharper. The end result
is that the amount of profit seen is quite close to the specified
markup of 30% (a tiny bit higher, could easily not be significant). I
guess the thing to do is to figure out just what unit of currency
people think in terms of, for the expected average price you are
starting from. Here, the price was in the neighbourhood of $1. Do
more people think a dollar is 4 quarters, or 100 pennies?

--

Gord

Re: Vagrant (virtual machines) and Devuan

Gordon Haverland
 

Well, if one works with the actual box that was full, VBoxManage isn't
let me clone it.

If I had of set up an apt-cache (or similar) before proceeding on this,
I could have had a cache of the packages downloaded, so that another
download from the Internet would not be needed. I suppose a person can
try and download all the packages from /var to the disk on the real
machine.

But, I did run a recursive copy (scp -rp ...) to get all the Qt5
stuff. Hopefully one can carry on from that.

But at this point, it looks like all one can do is destroy the box, and
then see if you can restart with a new box that is enlarged to begin
with.

--

Gord

Re: Vagrant (virtual machines) and Devuan

Gordon Haverland
 

Destroy (or rather, vagrant destroy) does get rid of one of the boxes
(I didn't check to see if it was a hardlink to the same storage, which
is possible).

I then asked vagrant to start over, and the box it seems to be using,
is the one which I had tried to resize to 30 GB via the
clone/resize/clone business (with reformats on the clones). But, both
fdisk -l and pvdisplay seem to be showing only 7.x GB. The resize made
the pseudo disk bigger, but the partition wall stayed in the same
place? So a person needs to somehow move the partition wall, and maybe
reformat ext4 the expanded pseudo disk area?

Oh well, time to go check the mail (snail mail).

--

Gord

A cracked window on the International Space Station? That's not good

Rene Matthijssen
 

They shouldn't have upgraded their Windows.
Oh, I see it was a real window not the Bill Gates version.
Rene
 
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/05/12/tiny_space_trash_impact_cracks_window_on_international_space_station/
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DISCLAIMER: This email contains my personal opinion and it is totally acceptable that you may see things differently. Please feel free to disagree with me, what is true for you is true for you.!
Instead of trusting what I have to say, I would suggest to trust your own intuition.
Trusting your intuition is the basis of discernment.




Re: A cracked window on the International Space Station? That's not good

 

It's amazing how small debris in space can be and still be damaging:  " it was probably a fleck of paint that had been shed from an old satellite or booster, or possibly a small metal fragment around a few thousandths of a millimetre across"


On Thu, 12 May 2016 at 20:34 Rene Matthijssen <rene@...> wrote:
They shouldn't have upgraded their Windows.
Oh, I see it was a real window not the Bill Gates version.
Rene
 
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/05/12/tiny_space_trash_impact_cracks_window_on_international_space_station/
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DISCLAIMER: This email contains my personal opinion and it is totally acceptable that you may see things differently. Please feel free to disagree with me, what is true for you is true for you.!
Instead of trusting what I have to say, I would suggest to trust your own intuition.
Trusting your intuition is the basis of discernment.




Re: A cracked window on the International Space Station? That's not good

Keehan Dowd
 

At the ISS's altitude, the orbital velocity is about 25000km/hr.   It's pretty remarkable what damage small debris particles can do: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Space_Station#Threat_of_orbital_debris

 

On Fri, May 13, 2016 at 9:45 AM, Lewis Gunsch <lewis@...> wrote:
It's amazing how small debris in space can be and still be damaging:  " it was probably a fleck of paint that had been shed from an old satellite or booster, or possibly a small metal fragment around a few thousandths of a millimetre across"

On Thu, 12 May 2016 at 20:34 Rene Matthijssen <rene@...> wrote:
They shouldn't have upgraded their Windows.
Oh, I see it was a real window not the Bill Gates version.
Rene
 
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/05/12/tiny_space_trash_impact_cracks_window_on_international_space_station/
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DISCLAIMER: This email contains my personal opinion and it is totally acceptable that you may see things differently. Please feel free to disagree with me, what is true for you is true for you.!
Instead of trusting what I have to say, I would suggest to trust your own intuition.
Trusting your intuition is the basis of discernment.





cmake, Qt and maybe KDE?

Gordon Haverland
 

I am still working through this VM stuff.

It would seem that not only is cmake a dependency of KDE,
extra-cmake-modules (or perhaps some similar name) is also a dependency
for KDE. In Debian, stable does not have an extra-cmake-modules (or
similar).

So, to do this for Devuan, would mean converting Debian to Devuan, and
since there are a zillions things involved in Qt and KDE, maybe making
a mistake. So, maybe it is easier to remove cmake, and compile cmake
from source.

So, I did that. And got the extra-cmake-modules stuff from KDE.

Qt had installed (into some home directory), but thinking about things
I think it is far more useful for me to have all this stuff install
into /usr/local or /opt. So, I started recompiling stuff, and at some
point I will have to look at undoing what might have been done before.

I gather the reason cmake was invented, was that the people involved
couldn't figure out how to get make to do what they wanted. It would
have been nice if they had finished cmake.

At one point, I had compiling die. The problem was that I had used
'make' instead of 'make install'; Because of that, cmake cannot find
some file. And this error is going on 2 years old.

Okay, the compiling died in another place. Go looking for that error,
apparently messing around with the -j option can get past this. Again,
this error is not new. I found -j2 worked for me.

I am following a Linux From Scratch thing on compiling Qt. It is
recommending I put all the files in /opt/qt-5.5.1, and make a symlink
from that directory to /opt/Qt5. Sounds reasonable to me. After the
stuff gets installed, root is is supposed to go along and clean files.
First it has you look in some bootstrap header file, then in a .pri
file, and then a bunch of .prl files. It seems that the Qt compiling
process, stores where these files were compiled. Nominally forever,
certainly until updated. It is no business of any program using Qt, to
know what directory these files were compiled in. Why is this
information being stored?

I originally ran out of room in a 8GB disk. I expanded the disk to 30
GB, and after compiling Qt5 I had used 25%. This is after cleaning
things up, immediately after compiling I think it was at 65%. I think
I will have to remove all things source from Qt (not installed in /opt)
just to free up room before I start on KDE. But I can't imagine not
having disk space problems compiling KDE. Even if I do it in pieces
(like phonon).

These guys would be lost on a 10 MB disk.

How much of this bloat could have been avoided, if they would have
learned how to use make? How much of this bloat comes from doing
things in C++, as opposed to C? Or the guys from long ago would say,
assembler?

--

Gord

OT - No problems

Rene Matthijssen
 

Since I have no computer problems and everything is working as it should, boredom set in.
So I figured, I'll share this graphic I made earlier today.
Rene


--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DISCLAIMER: This email contains my personal opinion and it is totally acceptable that you may see things differently. Please feel free to disagree with me, what is true for you is true for you.!
Instead of trusting what I have to say, I would suggest to trust your own intuition.
Trusting your intuition is the basis of discernment.




For those who do not want to upgrade to Win 10

Rene Matthijssen
 

GRC | Never10 
https://www.grc.com/never10.htm?1
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


DISCLAIMER: This email contains my personal opinion and it is totally acceptable that you may see things differently. Please feel free to disagree with me, what is true for you is true for you.!
Instead of trusting what I have to say, I would suggest to trust your own intuition.
Trusting your intuition is the basis of discernment.




Backup an NTFS Partition

Jeff Latta
 

I have a 500 GB hard drive set up with Grub dual boot, two NTFS partitions (Windows 7), and a number of ext4 partitions with Ubuntu 12.04 installed. The disk is Master Boot Record (MBR) partition tables. I want to do some maintenance and change the sizes of my partitions and install some new Linux distributions. My question relates to the NTFS partition mapped as drive C: having the Windows OS files. I need to enlarge that partition. First I want to back it up. I've installed a fresh 1 TB hard drive which can be used in any way to backup, clone, or copy the files from drive C:. I plan to boot Linux from a rescue CD--thinking of using SystemRescueCD--and am comfortable installing Grub 2 and setting up partitions etc.

How would you recommend copying or backing up the W7 OS partition so it can be easily restored?

Jeff

Re: Backup an NTFS Partition

Gordon Haverland
 

On Mon, 16 May 2016 19:45:40 -0600
"Jeff Latta" <eng@...> wrote:

How would you recommend copying or backing up the W7 OS partition so
it can be easily restored?
If all you wanted to do is store the data, there looks like lots of
possibilities. But, to restore permissions looks to not be trivial.

One page talks about a tool from M$ to do this: SubinACL.

http://www.ntfs.com/ntfs-permissions-restoring.htm

I guess the problem is that some of what UN*X calls permissions, are
part of the registry. Another is that NTFS will lock files to
locations.

I think long ago, people talked about "ghost" being able to restore to
a different sized partition. I don't even know if that software still
exists. But, it would need to be able to handle things like locked
file locations to do that.

--

Gord

Re: Backup an NTFS Partition

Mark Lane
 

For easily restoring an NTFS partition, clone is probably your best bet. I generally use clonezilla which comes as a linux live cd. It will even allow you to resize the partition though not you will probably have to run chkdisk under windows on a partition that has been resized with gparted.

On Tue, May 17, 2016 at 12:32 AM, Gordon Haverland <ghaverla@...> wrote:
On Mon, 16 May 2016 19:45:40 -0600
"Jeff Latta" <eng@...> wrote:

> How would you recommend copying or backing up the W7 OS partition so
> it can be easily restored?

If all you wanted to do is store the data, there looks like lots of
possibilities.  But, to restore permissions looks to not be trivial.

One page talks about a tool from M$ to do this: SubinACL.

http://www.ntfs.com/ntfs-permissions-restoring.htm

I guess the problem is that some of what UN*X calls permissions, are
part of the registry.  Another is that NTFS will lock files to
locations.

I think long ago, people talked about "ghost" being able to restore to
a different sized partition.  I don't even know if that software still
exists.  But, it would need to be able to handle things like locked
file locations to do that.

--

Gord







Baffled

Rene Matthijssen
 

Hi,
I have an external USB hard drive (1 TB) which I use for backing up our computers. I decided to clean up the hard drive by formatting it, but although the format was acknowledged as successful, it no longer mounts the drive.
When I go to "accessories" and select "disks", it shows the drive just fine with all the particulars.
However, "edit mount" is grayed out.
How do I change it that it automatically mounts the drive when I plug it in ?
Thank you for the help.
Rene
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Re: Baffled

Rene Matthijssen
 

Problem solved !
I connected the drive to my spare computer and although it did not automatically mount, it did allow me to mount it manually.
Moving the drive back to my main computer now automatically mounted the drive.
I just finished backing up my computer.
Rene


On 2016-05-19 02:01 PM, Rene Matthijssen wrote:
Hi,
I have an external USB hard drive (1 TB) which I use for backing up our computers. I decided to clean up the hard drive by formatting it, but although the format was acknowledged as successful, it no longer mounts the drive.
When I go to "accessories" and select "disks", it shows the drive just fine with all the particulars.
However, "edit mount" is grayed out.
How do I change it that it automatically mounts the drive when I plug it in ?
Thank you for the help.
Rene
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



OT: physical prototype development

Gordon Haverland
 

In my mail Friday, was a 12V centrifugal fan. I had seen a number of
centrifugal fans that day on AliExpress, what caught my eye on this one
is that because of how its exhaust port was constructed, I could easily
do experiments on how an exhaust port should be constructed.

But, the reason to buy the fan was to make a fume hood for a soldering
station, so that I don't breathe in flux and solder fumes, and instead
have them absorbed on an activated charcoal filter.

Another set of fans I recently purchased (230mm), I think can be put to
use by conventional subtractive techniques and some drawings.

But, what I think I need here, is to use modelling clay to extend the
part, so that I can apply something to the outside surface (ala paper
mache) and eventually mold a part.

The fan body appears to be PVC (black), and at some point I want to
interface it to DWV type plastic piping to go to the air filter.

Is modelling clay what I want to use to make the temporary surface to
mold? Do I need to use mold release on it? Can I use the clay for
other things after? What should I be applying (instead of paper and
wet flour)?

Maybe someone just has a pointer to web sites talking about this? I
don't know.

Eventually, I hope to have 2 things. One is a product that others
might buy. Two is a paper/page describing what I did, so that they can
build for themselves. Under the same sort of license as Arduino
typically works with.

And, seeing as this is for doing Arduino stuff, the idea is to make it
useful. So maybe a person puts a motion detector in the field of view,
and when someone puts their arm in there, it turns on the lights, turns
on the power to the soldering iron, and 10 minutes later turns on a
green LED to say the soldering iron is up to temperature and then turn
on the ventillation fan.

What would you want in your soldering station?

Do we put essential oils into the exhaust of the activated charcoal
filter, so that the air smells better? Turn on a heater for the base
of the spine of the chair the person soldering sits in? Play
Wagner (German composer) on speakers in the work station?

--

Gord

Re: OT: physical prototype development

Keehan Dowd
 

I've used "PolyMorph" plastic to make a couple of protoypes in the past.   It sells under several names - InstaMorph and PlastiMake are other names.  It's a low melting point plastic that gets soft at around 45 degrees C and is very mouldable as it cools and then hardens again well before getting back to room temperature.   I got the stock I have at the moment from Princess Auto but I don't see it on their website any more.  Here's some I found on AliExpress though:
http://www.aliexpress.com/item/200g-Plastimake-Polymorph-and-1g-free-color-pigment-Thermoplastic-Friendly-Plastic-DIY-aka-Instamorph/32497896008.html

Regards,
Keehan.

On Sat, May 21, 2016 at 7:57 PM, Gordon Haverland <ghaverla@...> wrote:
In my mail Friday, was a 12V centrifugal fan.  I had seen a number of
centrifugal fans that day on AliExpress, what caught my eye on this one
is that because of how its exhaust port was constructed, I could easily
do experiments on how an exhaust port should be constructed.

But, the reason to buy the fan was to make a fume hood for a soldering
station, so that I don't breathe in flux and solder fumes, and instead
have them absorbed on an activated charcoal filter.

Another set of fans I recently purchased (230mm), I think can be put to
use by conventional subtractive techniques and some drawings.

But, what I think I need here, is to use modelling clay to extend the
part, so that I can apply something to the outside surface (ala paper
mache) and eventually mold a part.

The fan body appears to be PVC (black), and at some point I want to
interface it to DWV type plastic piping to go to the air filter.

Is modelling clay what I want to use to make the temporary surface to
mold?  Do I need to use mold release on it?  Can I use the clay for
other things after?  What should I be applying (instead of paper and
wet flour)?

Maybe someone just has a pointer to web sites talking about this?  I
don't know.

Eventually, I hope to have 2 things.  One is a product that others
might buy.  Two is a paper/page describing what I did, so that they can
build for themselves.  Under the same sort of license as Arduino
typically works with.

And, seeing as this is for doing Arduino stuff, the idea is to make it
useful.  So maybe a person puts a motion detector in the field of view,
and when someone puts their arm in there, it turns on the lights, turns
on the power to the soldering iron, and 10 minutes later turns on a
green LED to say the soldering iron is up to temperature and then turn
on the ventillation fan.

What would you want in your soldering station?

Do we put essential oils into the exhaust of the activated charcoal
filter, so that the air smells better?  Turn on a heater for the base
of the spine of the chair the person soldering sits in?  Play
Wagner (German composer) on speakers in the work station?

--

Gord





Re: OT: physical prototype development

Frederick R. McDougall
 

Gordon
This is starting to sound like a 3d printer project but can you sell enough units to afford the capital cost.

Work station requirements to keep me happy include
Excellent lighting
Magnifying glass 3x
A few extra power outlets
3rd hand clips on flex mounts  at least 2 but 4 is better
A small vacuum vice to hold boards
Wet sponge to clean soldar copper
Close by shelf to hold supplies
A slightly soft adjustable chair or stool

My nervana list goes on for several pages but will be different than yours.  My experience as an electronics tech was that soldar fumes always found your nose and eyes unless you were outside in a gale but I will happily read about your experiments on the subject.  New projects never bothered me but rebuilds were mostly bad to very ugly.

Good luck
Fred

On May 21, 2016 8:31 PM, "Keehan Dowd" <keehan.dowd@...> wrote:
I've used "PolyMorph" plastic to make a couple of protoypes in the past.   It sells under several names - InstaMorph and PlastiMake are other names.  It's a low melting point plastic that gets soft at around 45 degrees C and is very mouldable as it cools and then hardens again well before getting back to room temperature.   I got the stock I have at the moment from Princess Auto but I don't see it on their website any more.  Here's some I found on AliExpress though:
http://www.aliexpress.com/item/200g-Plastimake-Polymorph-and-1g-free-color-pigment-Thermoplastic-Friendly-Plastic-DIY-aka-Instamorph/32497896008.html

Regards,
Keehan.

On Sat, May 21, 2016 at 7:57 PM, Gordon Haverland <ghaverla@...> wrote:
In my mail Friday, was a 12V centrifugal fan.  I had seen a number of
centrifugal fans that day on AliExpress, what caught my eye on this one
is that because of how its exhaust port was constructed, I could easily
do experiments on how an exhaust port should be constructed.

But, the reason to buy the fan was to make a fume hood for a soldering
station, so that I don't breathe in flux and solder fumes, and instead
have them absorbed on an activated charcoal filter.

Another set of fans I recently purchased (230mm), I think can be put to
use by conventional subtractive techniques and some drawings.

But, what I think I need here, is to use modelling clay to extend the
part, so that I can apply something to the outside surface (ala paper
mache) and eventually mold a part.

The fan body appears to be PVC (black), and at some point I want to
interface it to DWV type plastic piping to go to the air filter.

Is modelling clay what I want to use to make the temporary surface to
mold?  Do I need to use mold release on it?  Can I use the clay for
other things after?  What should I be applying (instead of paper and
wet flour)?

Maybe someone just has a pointer to web sites talking about this?  I
don't know.

Eventually, I hope to have 2 things.  One is a product that others
might buy.  Two is a paper/page describing what I did, so that they can
build for themselves.  Under the same sort of license as Arduino
typically works with.

And, seeing as this is for doing Arduino stuff, the idea is to make it
useful.  So maybe a person puts a motion detector in the field of view,
and when someone puts their arm in there, it turns on the lights, turns
on the power to the soldering iron, and 10 minutes later turns on a
green LED to say the soldering iron is up to temperature and then turn
on the ventillation fan.

What would you want in your soldering station?

Do we put essential oils into the exhaust of the activated charcoal
filter, so that the air smells better?  Turn on a heater for the base
of the spine of the chair the person soldering sits in?  Play
Wagner (German composer) on speakers in the work station?

--

Gord





Re: OT: physical prototype development

Gordon Haverland
 

On Sat, 21 May 2016 21:12:31 -0600
"Frederick R. McDougall" <frmcdo@...> wrote:

This is starting to sound like a 3d printer project but can you sell
enough units to afford the capital cost.
At least one engineer in the Peace Region executive of APEGA, wants to
see a hackerspace in Grande Prairie. And I may have worded that
wrong. But, when I wrote saying that I was going to start bringing
Arduino and RPi to Dawson Creek (which would be first in the Peace, AB
or BC), they were interested. To me, this opens the idea of a co-op,
where all of us could order as one, and get better prices.

But still, my feeling is that almost nobody in OpenHardware makes any
money by selling OpenHardware developed by other people or
organizations. If you want to actually pay bills, you need to offer a
product that other people are too lazy (or something) to build for
themselves. That you provide plans to build it for themselves is of
minor interest (some? most?) of the time. Where it is of interest, is
if they know of someone local who will build it for less than I would
sell it for.

You sell OpenHardware to educate the public.

If business/commercial applications come along, that is a bonus.

I will turn your "magnifying glass" into an optical magnifier.

I just bought some stuff from SparkFun, and it arrived. One of the
items was a small oscilloscope. Something in this, excites the USA
government and ITAR is involved. And so I had to tell the USA
government that I would keep this forever, and that I would never use
it to make munitions to attack the USA.

All I seen at SparkFun was the description. I opened the box, and
there are boards and soldering for me to do. But, there is a tiny LCD
screen. This is my oscilloscope. Possibly powered by 1 or 2 LiFePO4
batteries. Or an appropriate source on a board.

But, I can see that having a "microscope" as part of this, might be
something to think of. And thanks.

--

Gord

Re: OT: physical prototype development

Rene Matthijssen
 

I have a very small microscope that displays on your computer.  It uses Windows and I only used it two times. It works quite well.
You can have it for $15 plus postage.
Rene



On 2016-05-21 09:55 PM, Gordon Haverland wrote:
But, I can see that having a "microscope" as part of this, might be
something to think of.  And thanks.