HAIRSTANES and GLEDSTANES


Carole Mason
 

Hello

I joined this group a few weeks ago, and sent a message introducing myself but as far as I can tell it was never sent to the group, so I am trying again.

I am descended directly from Isobel HAIRSTANES (1691-1766), the daughter of Matthew HAIRSTANES Laird of Craigs. She was the second wife of John MATHISON, a minister of the Church of Scotland in Edinburgh. She was born in Dumfries, and returned there after her husband's death. Through Isobel I am also related to the GLEDSTANES family. (There are various spellings of these names.)

My understanding is that Craigs was the name of the house on the lands of OVER KELWOOD, occupied for some time by members of the HAIRSTANES family and before them by the GLEDSTANES.

Carole Mason
London


Irene Macleod
 

You’ve already traced a good way back. What further information are you looking for? And where have you looked already? Maps? Sasines? Kirk sessions? Gravestone inscriptions? Census? OPRs?
Irene


On 19 Jan 2022, at 23:16, Carole Mason <carole@...> wrote:

Hello

I joined this group a few weeks ago, and sent a message introducing myself but as far as I can tell it was never sent to the group, so I am trying again.

I am descended directly from Isobel HAIRSTANES (1691-1766), the daughter of Matthew HAIRSTANES Laird of Craigs. She was the second wife of John MATHISON, a minister of the Church of Scotland in Edinburgh. She was born in Dumfries, and returned there after her husband's death. Through Isobel I am also related to the GLEDSTANES family. (There are various spellings of these names.)

My understanding is that Craigs was the name of the house on the lands of OVER KELWOOD, occupied for some time by members of the HAIRSTANES family and before them by the GLEDSTANES.

Carole Mason
London


Carole Mason
 

Very good questions!

In the first place, I hoped I might be able to connect with other people descended from these families, or who have researched them. (I am aware of this website https://www.hairston.org/index.htm.)

But secondly, and more generally, I'm hoping to get a broader understanding of the records I have already found and the context in which they were created. I've just finished reading Chris Paton's "Tracing your Scottish Ancestry through Church and State Records", which has been very helpful, but still leaves some questions unanswered. Here is one: he doesn't say anything about Scottish currency. John Hairstanes of Craigs was fined for having taken part in the invasion of Dumfries in 1644. The sum was £2000 - at least I think it was pounds - I've attached the record. In England that would have been an absolutely massive sum, but I don't know what the equivalent would have been in Scotland.

As to where I've looked - I've done the best I could with online resources. I have subscriptions to Ancestry and Find my Past, and have downloaded a number of OPRs from Scotland's People. From Scotland's People I have also downloaded some wills, but cannot read them; however, Chris Paton mentions the Scottish Handwriting website which I hope will help me. I've searched through the Transactions of the Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Society, in which an article about the Hairstanes was published in 2012, and I've looked at the History of Dumfries by Edgar ed Reid. I've looked at volumes of the Great Seal of Scotland and the Inquisitionum ad Capellam Domini Regis Retornatorum, mostly on Internet Archive or Google Books, but I'm not sure how thorough I've been and in any case haven't always understood what I found. I think I will have to make a research trip to Scotland; one thing I learned from Chris Paton is that there are many resources in Scottish archives and libraries which are not online. Until then I am hoping that reading the discussions on this group will be instructive.

Here is another question which Chris Paton didn't answer. What actually was a Laird - what were his qualifications, duties and responsibilities?

Carole, in London

On 20/01/2022 07:25, Irene Macleod via groups.io wrote:
You’ve already traced a good way back. What further information are you looking for? And where have you looked already? Maps? Sasines? Kirk sessions? Gravestone inscriptions? Census? OPRs?
Irene
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Terence Brown
 

Hi Carole,

If you are seeking to connect with others researching these families, have you searched the DGFHS Surnames Index at https://dgfhs.org.uk/pedigree-chart-surname-index/?
That confirms they have members researching Hairstains in Morton Parish, Dumfriesshire and Hairstanes and Hairstens in Holywood Parish Dumfriesshire. However to access the information you do need to be a member of the Society. You can join at https://dgfhs.org.uk/product/new-uk-membership/

Regards,
Terry Brown

-----Original Message-----
From: dumfriesandgallowaygenealogy@groups.io <dumfriesandgallowaygenealogy@groups.io> On Behalf Of Carole Mason via groups.io
Sent: 20 January 2022 16:13
To: dumfriesandgallowaygenealogy@groups.io
Subject: Re: [dumfriesandgallowaygenealogy] HAIRSTANES and GLEDSTANES

Very good questions!

In the first place, I hoped I might be able to connect with other people descended from these families, or who have researched them. (I am aware of this website https://www.hairston.org/index.htm.)

But secondly, and more generally, I'm hoping to get a broader understanding of the records I have already found and the context in which they were created. I've just finished reading Chris Paton's "Tracing your Scottish Ancestry through Church and State Records", which has been very helpful, but still leaves some questions unanswered. Here is one: he doesn't say anything about Scottish currency. John Hairstanes of Craigs was fined for having taken part in the invasion of Dumfries in 1644. The sum was £2000 - at least I think it was pounds - I've attached the record. In England that would have been an absolutely massive sum, but I don't know what the equivalent would have been in Scotland.

As to where I've looked - I've done the best I could with online resources. I have subscriptions to Ancestry and Find my Past, and have downloaded a number of OPRs from Scotland's People. From Scotland's People I have also downloaded some wills, but cannot read them; however, Chris Paton mentions the Scottish Handwriting website which I hope will help me. I've searched through the Transactions of the Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Society, in which an article about the Hairstanes was published in 2012, and I've looked at the History of Dumfries by Edgar ed Reid. I've looked at volumes of the Great Seal of Scotland and the Inquisitionum ad Capellam Domini Regis Retornatorum, mostly on Internet Archive or Google Books, but I'm not sure how thorough I've been and in any case haven't always understood what I found. I think I will have to make a research trip to Scotland; one thing I learned from Chris Paton is that there are many resources in Scottish archives and libraries which are not online. Until then I am hoping that reading the discussions on this group will be instructive.

Here is another question which Chris Paton didn't answer. What actually was a Laird - what were his qualifications, duties and responsibilities?

Carole, in London

On 20/01/2022 07:25, Irene Macleod via groups.io wrote:
You’ve already traced a good way back. What further information are
you looking for? And where have you looked already? Maps? Sasines?
Kirk sessions? Gravestone inscriptions? Census? OPRs?
Irene
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Carole Mason
 

Thanks Terry - I joined the Society but I don't have a membership number yet, so I'll follow this up later.

Carole

On 20/01/2022 16:53, Terence Brown wrote:
Hi Carole,

If you are seeking to connect with others researching these families, have you searched the DGFHS Surnames Index at https://dgfhs.org.uk/pedigree-chart-surname-index/?
That confirms they have members researching Hairstains in Morton Parish, Dumfriesshire and Hairstanes and Hairstens in Holywood Parish Dumfriesshire. However to access the information you do need to be a member of the Society. You can join at https://dgfhs.org.uk/product/new-uk-membership/

Regards,
Terry Brown

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


McBrucie
 

The merk is a long-obsolete Scottish silver coin. Originally the same word as a money mark of silver, the merk was in circulation at the end of the 16th century and in the 17th century. It was originally valued at 13 shillings 4 pence (exactly 2⁄3 of a pound Scots, or about one English shilling), later raised to 14s.


On Thu, 20 Jan 2022, 16:13 Carole Mason, <carole@...> wrote:
Very good questions!

In the first place, I hoped I might be able to connect with other people
descended from these families, or who have researched them. (I am aware
of this website https://www.hairston.org/index.htm.)

But secondly, and more generally, I'm hoping to get a broader
understanding of the records I have already found and the context in
which they were created. I've just finished reading Chris Paton's
"Tracing your Scottish Ancestry through Church and State Records", which
has been very helpful, but still leaves some questions unanswered. Here
is one: he doesn't say anything about Scottish currency. John Hairstanes
of Craigs was fined for having taken part in the invasion of Dumfries in
1644. The sum was £2000 - at least I think it was pounds - I've attached
the record. In England that would have been an absolutely massive sum,
but I don't know what the equivalent would have been in Scotland.

As to where I've looked - I've done the best I could with online
resources. I have subscriptions to Ancestry and Find my Past, and have
downloaded a number of OPRs from Scotland's People. From Scotland's
People I have also downloaded some wills, but cannot read them; however,
Chris Paton mentions the Scottish Handwriting website which I hope will
help me. I've searched through the Transactions of the Dumfriesshire and
Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Society, in which an article
about the Hairstanes was published in 2012, and I've looked at the
History of Dumfries by Edgar ed Reid. I've looked at volumes of the
Great Seal of Scotland and the Inquisitionum ad Capellam Domini Regis
Retornatorum, mostly on Internet Archive or Google Books, but I'm not
sure how thorough I've been and in any case haven't always understood
what I found. I think I will have to make a research trip to Scotland;
one thing I learned from Chris Paton is that there are many resources in
Scottish archives and libraries which are not online. Until then I am
hoping that reading the discussions on this group will be instructive.

Here is another question which Chris Paton didn't answer. What actually
was a Laird - what were his qualifications, duties and responsibilities?

Carole, in London

On 20/01/2022 07:25, Irene Macleod via groups.io wrote:
> You’ve already traced a good way back. What further information are
> you looking for? And where have you looked already? Maps? Sasines?
> Kirk sessions? Gravestone inscriptions? Census? OPRs?
> Irene

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus






Carole Mason
 

That's very helpful, thank you.

The record says that John Hairstanes was fined 3,000 merks, and this is also expressed as 2,000 pounds because a merk is two-thirds of a pound. On top of this, the Scottish pound was worth less than the English pound. So it was a heavy fine, but not quite as heavy as I had imagined.

Carole

On 20/01/2022 19:05, McBrucie wrote:
The merk is a long-obsolete Scottish silver coin. Originally the same word as a money mark of silver, the merk was in circulation at the end of the 16th century and in the 17th century. It was originally valued at 13 shillings 4 pence (exactly 2⁄3 of a pound Scots, or about one English shilling), later raised to 14s.



Virus-free. www.avast.com