Date   

Re: GPT Partition Types

Wayne A. Smith
 

A final update on this project, for anyone who might be interested and for whatever future assistance it might impart.

I then created a Utilities directory on one of the FAT32 partitions, and installed DFSee 16.9 to it. The reason was that the revisions of DFSee later than the one installed on DFSPUP64 allowed me to create GUID partitions for the prospective ArcaOS 5.1 version.

Using DFSee 16.9 I then proceeded to create four partitions of GUID Partition Type
OS2 ArcaOS Type 1
even though they will remain blank and unformatted for the present. The process was quite transparent and uncomplicated.

Finally, after creating one more FAT32 partition for data, I created a partition for Linux using GUID Partition Type
Linux Root x86-64
the partition type code being 8304. This likely corresponds to one of the types mentioned by Felix.

Being less adept than either Fred or Felix in Linux, not knowing how to use and install to separate partitions, I created a large partition, about 65 Gb I believe. (Since this is a 2 Tb disk, there is room to spare.) I then successfully installed Linux Mint Debian 4, including Grub, to it.

After shutting down I rebooted and (for this HP Pavilion notebook) used
Esc -> F9
and it listed both the Windows and Debian boot manager. (Apparently the EFI file was somehow updated but being more than a novice in the ESP partition and EFI process I can only "go with the flow".) Both OSs booted fine from this screen.

Given this there was no need to install any type of GPT Boot Manager; the above option will do fine for the moment. I will simply await the GA release of ArcaOS 5.1 to see how Arca Noae decides how to handle the boot manage issue.

On Sat, 16 Oct 2021 11:29:34 -0400 (EDT) Wayne A. Smith wrote:

An update on the below.

I did some more research yesterday and finally decided that Windows Basic Data was the appropriate GUID Partition Type for use for applications and data files. So I booted
DFSPUP64 again to see if there were any menu options that might resolve the problem.
While I still speculated that the uncalculated Byte size of the partitions could be the problem, I decided that the boot fix and geometry fix options might create more problems then
they would solve. I then noticed the option
Actions -> Resize partition and FS -> Adjust FS to partition size
and concluded that using it wouldn't hurt and might be a solution. So I activated it for both FAT32 partitions.

Exiting and booting to Windows didn't result in the partitions being displaced either in the My PC or Disk Management screens. Noticing the menu item
View -> Refresh
I decided to use it and both FAT32 partitions now appeared on the screen. I have no idea whether this alone would have been sufficient or if it combined w/ the Resize and Adjust
commands were the solution. In any event those steps might be worthy of consideration if anyone else encounters this problem on a GPT system.

I'm now ready to proceed w/ my other steps.


On Thu, 14 Oct 2021 18:38:47 -0700 Wayne A. Smith wrote:

...

I'm not sure what I did wrong. Perhaps it was the size of the
partitions. I kinda' know that different file systems use different block (?) and sector sizes; however I don't know how to
convert them. For these I used round numbers of 20000 Mb and 25000 Mb; those are w/in the FAT32 limit.

...


Re: GPT Partition Types

Wayne A. Smith
 

An update on the below.

I did some more research yesterday and finally decided that Windows Basic Data was the appropriate GUID Partition Type for use for applications and data files. So I booted DFSPUP64 again to see if there were any menu options that might resolve the problem.

While I still speculated that the uncalculated Byte size of the partitions could be the problem, I decided that the boot fix and geometry fix options might create more problems then they would solve. I then noticed the option
Actions -> Resize partition and FS -> Adjust FS to partition size
and concluded that using it wouldn't hurt and might be a solution. So I activated it for both FAT32 partitions.

Exiting and booting to Windows didn't result in the partitions being displaced either in the My PC or Disk Management screens. Noticing the menu item
View -> Refresh
I decided to use it and both FAT32 partitions now appeared on the screen. I have no idea whether this alone would have been sufficient or if it combined w/ the Resize and Adjust commands were the solution. In any event those steps might be worthy of consideration if anyone else encounters this problem on a GPT system.

I'm now ready to proceed w/ my other steps.

On Thu, 14 Oct 2021 18:38:47 -0700 Wayne A. Smith wrote:

...

I'm not sure what I did wrong. Perhaps it was the size of the partitions. I kinda' know that different file systems use different block (?) and sector sizes; however I don't know how to convert them. For these I used round numbers of 20000 Mb and 25000 Mb; those are w/in the FAT32 limit.

...


Re: GPT Partition Types

Wayne A. Smith
 

Sorry Fred. I guess I wasn't sufficiently clear. I am using DFSPUP64 for these operations. (I certainly wouldn't want to mess it up using the Windows functions, and only used it for resizing.)

Before I noted your kind reply and that of Felix,, I decided to go ahead and, w/ DFSPUP32, created two partitions using the Basic Data type. I named them and then formatted them as FAT32, first in Short and then in Long format.

Opening Windows 10 and going first to File Explorer and then Disk Management neither partition is displayed. However,, the Free Space now available has been reduced by the size of those partitions.

I'm not sure what I did wrong. Perhaps it was the size of the partitions. I kinda' know that different file systems use different block (?) and sector sizes; however I don't know how to convert them. For these I used round numbers of 20000 Mb and 25000 Mb; those are w/in the FAT32 limit.

LVM occurred to me as possibly the solution, but this is unavailable for GPT drives. Any ideas?

I've noticed the helpful suggestions of you and Felix regarding Linux. Once I get the FAT32 partitions working, and create some new ones, then I'll deal w/ that. The idea now is to get the FAT32 partitions accessible, install DFSee to the first one (for Win 10 Apps), create some unformatted partitions for later use by ArcaOS 5.1 (as Jan's last revisions provide an option for this type), and then create the Linux partition. Then the suggestions of you and Felix will be pursued.


Re: GPT Partition Types

Felix Miata
 

Wayne A. Smith composed on 2021-10-14 13:08 (UTC-0400):

I now have Windows 10 shrunk to the chosen size, and am ready to start to
Create Partitions. The choices are numerous and confusing.
My guess right now, based upon the terminology used by Windows Disk
Management, until I get to the Linux partitioning (which are also more
numerous than I expected) is that I should use
Windows Basic Data
Be not concerned about the names. Use Windows to shrink Windows. Use DFSee for
*everything* else. DFSee will get the binary partition types right according to
the descriptive types you select for creation. Unlike Windows and OS/2, Linux is
not particularly picky about the types assigned. It would be perfectly happy to
use a type FAT partition to host a native Linux filesystem. Best to avoid
confusion by keeping the types matched to the filesystems hosted though.

These partitions would be used for the installation of applications and
data, and this seemed the likely type to specify. Am I right or wrong?
In Linux, the package management system integrates applications with the operating
system. In a basic installation, only one filesystem is necessary for them.

Data comes in system and user types. System data is mingled with the system and
applications. User data officially goes in the directory /home, but can be placed
freely in arbitrary locations according to permissions the administrator puts in
place. /home can be a separate filesystem. When it is, an operating system
addition, deletion or change will have no reason to disturb its content, while
backing up and restoring can be more efficient.

Then I assume that once you get the partitions created one can proceed to
the volume formatting and naming. Since I don't want to mess-up the first
step I haven't proceeded to this step to verify it.
With GPT, you (using DFSee, among other ways) can assign names to the partitions
any time, before or after creating a filesystem. These names are independent of
any filesystem labels you may assign during or after formatting.

A question on Linux, while I am at it. The appropriate options for
partition creation seemed:
Linux /home
Linux Root
for installation of a new Linux OS. But what's the difference and which
one? (Since "/home" I believe is a component of "Root", I would think the
latter is the proper type.)
/home is a directory in the root filesystem that does dual duty as a "mount point"
when user data is kept on a separate filesystem "mounted" to it, which may be on a
partition, or on a logical volume.

Perhaps Jan, has one of his document files going into this in sufficient
detail, and I will look for one, but thought I would ask these questions
first if I am unable to find it.
As to Linux types, FYI:
0x82 swap
0x83 Linux EXTx by far most often, others too
0x8E Linux LVM
0xFD Linux RAID

Linux considers 0x05, 0x0F and 0x85 to be equivalent extended types, all unused
with GPT.
--
Evolution as taught in public schools is, like religion,
based on faith, not based on science.

Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409 ** a11y rocks!

Felix Miata


Re: GPT Partition Types

Fred J. Tydeman
 

On Thu, 14 Oct 2021 13:08:19 -0400 (EDT) Wayne A. Smith wrote:

I now have Windows 10 shrunk to the chosen size, and am ready to start to Create Partitions. The choices are numerous
and confusing.

My guess right now, based upon the terminology used by Windows Disk Management, until I get to the Linux partitioning
(which are also more numerous than I expected) is that I should use
Windows Basic Data
These partitions would be used for the installation of applications and data, and this seemed the likely type to specify.
Am I right or wrong?
It might be easier to use DFSee to allocate the partitions as you can have
it use the correct partition id/type. Windows Disk Management only knows
about windows partitions (as I recall).

Then I assume that once you get the partitions created one can proceed to the volume formatting and naming. Since I
don't want to mess-up the first step I haven't proceeded to this step to verify it.
Better to use DFSee to do the naming. As I recall, neither can format Linux partitions.

A question on Linux, while I am at it. The appropriate options for partition creation seemed:
Linux /home
Linux Root
for installation of a new Linux OS. But what's the difference and which one? (Since "/home" I believe is a component of
"Root", I would think the latter is the proper type.)
The Linux systems that I use (Fedora) normally wants four partitions:
/boot/efi == The ESP boot partition
/ == root
swap
/home == your data
If you are going to have just one Linux system, that is OK.

Since I install and maintain multiple versions of Fedora on the same disk,
I only have a small /home for each and it is just part of /
So, I have
/boot/efi == about 260 Meg in size, FAT32 file system
swap == 4 Gig in size
/ for Fedora Linux #1 == 8 Gig in size, ext4 file system
/ for Fedora Linux #2 and so on == 8 Gig in size, ext4 file system
/lindata == shared data for all Linux systems == 16 Gig in size, ext4 file system

Linux can access your Windows partitions.


---
Fred J. Tydeman Tydeman Consulting
tydeman@tybor.com Testing, numerics, programming
+1 (702) 608-6093 Vice-chair of PL22.11 (ANSI "C")
Sample C99+FPCE tests: http://www.tybor.com
Savers sleep well, investors eat well, spenders work forever.


GPT Partition Types

Wayne A. Smith
 

I now have Windows 10 shrunk to the chosen size, and am ready to start to Create Partitions. The choices are numerous and confusing.

My guess right now, based upon the terminology used by Windows Disk Management, until I get to the Linux partitioning (which are also more numerous than I expected) is that I should use
Windows Basic Data
These partitions would be used for the installation of applications and data, and this seemed the likely type to specify. Am I right or wrong?

Then I assume that once you get the partitions created one can proceed to the volume formatting and naming. Since I don't want to mess-up the first step I haven't proceeded to this step to verify it.

A question on Linux, while I am at it. The appropriate options for partition creation seemed:
Linux /home
Linux Root
for installation of a new Linux OS. But what's the difference and which one? (Since "/home" I believe is a component of "Root", I would think the latter is the proper type.)

Perhaps Jan, has one of his document files going into this in sufficient detail, and I will look for one, but thought I would ask these questions first if I am unable to find it.


Re: GPT Boot Manager

Wayne A. Smith
 

Thanks Fred. I'll, if necessary, look into it.

I just finished yesterday creating images w/ DFSee of each individual partition, and the partition information, as well as of the entire disk - just so I can restore everything if I marf up w/ the partition creation and OS installation procedure. (DFSPUP64 is a real speed demon. Though admittedly only a portion of the 1 TB disk has files and I of course used Smart Compress, still the image of the entire disk only took slightly more than an hour.) I'll also today examine the DFSee options for creating backups of the boot record; I have in the past used it to create an image of the MBR, but I'm not sure of the exact terminology or procedure w/ a GPT disk. (Fred gave a useful suggestion which I will also investigate.)

Once I have the partitions and install LMDE 4 on one of them, then I will be able to see to what the boot options in the setup utility allow me to access. If they don't disclose both OSs then I will have to look into accessing the EFI file.

On Tue, 12 Oct 2021 05:16:08 CEST Fred J. Tydeman <tydeman@tybor.com> wrote:

On Sat, 09 Oct 2021 13:47:57 -0400 (EDT) Wayne A. Smith wrote:

Thanks in advance for any help, and I apologize for any tangential
issues raised.

I believe one can use BCDEdit on a Windows machine to edit the Boot Configuration Data
so that when Windows starts to boot, you can have a choice of booting other partitions.

I guess that ends up changing files in ..ESP.../efi/EFI/Microsoft/Boot/*


---
Fred J. Tydeman Tydeman Consulting
tydeman@tybor.com Testing, numerics, programming
+1 (702) 608-6093 Vice-chair of PL22.11 (ANSI "C")
Sample C99+FPCE tests: http://www.tybor.com
Savers sleep well, investors eat well, spenders work forever.
--
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Mute This Topic: https://groups.io/mt/86198869/5228409


Re: GPT Boot Manager

Fred J. Tydeman
 

On Sat, 09 Oct 2021 13:47:57 -0400 (EDT) Wayne A. Smith wrote:

Thanks in advance for any help, and I apologize for any tangential issues raised.
I believe one can use BCDEdit on a Windows machine to edit the Boot Configuration Data
so that when Windows starts to boot, you can have a choice of booting other partitions.

I guess that ends up changing files in ..ESP.../efi/EFI/Microsoft/Boot/*


---
Fred J. Tydeman Tydeman Consulting
tydeman@tybor.com Testing, numerics, programming
+1 (702) 608-6093 Vice-chair of PL22.11 (ANSI "C")
Sample C99+FPCE tests: http://www.tybor.com
Savers sleep well, investors eat well, spenders work forever.


Re: GPT Boot Manager

Wayne A. Smith
 

Thanks Felix.

I had no idea until the below, plus Jan's comment, that the ESP Partition was FAT32. This would seem to make your procedure feasible.

As of right now, until after partitioning and installation of LMDE 4, I have no plans to fiddle w/ the ESP Partition. If I can avoid it so much the better. But if selection of the boot options becomes uncertain, then I will do so and consider the EFI Boot Manager options. They seem to add more gloss than the "simple" options the base UEFI allows. But if the latter works, I will be more than happy w/ it.

On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 21:01:42 -0700 dfsee-support@groups.io wrote:

ESP partitions normally only have files with no special attributes. The file count
is few, and the sizes modest. You can zip the partition's content, later unzip
into any FAT32 'ESP' partition. Or, simply copy the content to a convenient
location, then copy back.


Re: GPT Boot Manager

Wayne A. Smith
 

Thanks Jan.

I had done some superficial research into EFI Boot Managers, and will continue to do so. It may be though that the necessity is minimal.

I also broached the issue on <mantis.arcanoae.com> and Dave Yeo's most-recent comment included the following:
"For UEFI, Arca Noae isn't planning too much in the way of a boot manager but
there is no reason that you can't use any others, rEFInd seems to work well from
reports. And of course there is the builtin one accessed by pressing F12 or
similar on many computers, usually have to set things up in the BIOS and the ESP
volume.
So basically UEFI hopefully will work much the same as on other operating
systems excepting secure boot won't be supported.
None of what I stated is official and things can change "

After disabling Secure Boot and enabling Legacy Support on the HP machine (and of course changing the boot order) - in order that DFSPUP64 would boot - the left corner of the screen gave a notice to the effect "Press Fx to access boot options"; this was after I had already successfully booted to DFSPUP64 to create some of the images; this would seem to confirm what Dave mentioned (other than "set[ting] up things ... in the ESP volume". As I had not yet installed any other OS I just let the boot continue to see what would happen, and it booted to Win 10.

It then may be that the configuration of the ESP volume might be unnecessary or minimal. Time will tell after I finish the images of the current disk and partitions, to make sure I don't marf up anything and can restore the current state, and then create new partitions for LMDE 4 , and future 5.1, installation. I will then see of what those boot options consist.

On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 21:01:42 -0700 dfsee-support@groups.io wrote:

.
Yes, there is.
UEFI actually puts a little more system function into it than BIOS, and that includes OS-neutral utilities that run from the so called EFI-system-partition. (A FAT32 disguised with another partition type)

This partition also contains the first-step loader for the operating system(s), and when there are more that can include a bootmanager. Of which there are several available.

These run in EFI mode, so are NOT Windows, Linux or any other OS compatible executables!


That said, I am certainly not an expert on this, have not experimented with it yet, since solar my systems have been single-OS.



The current layout of the drive shows
Disk 0 partition1 260 Mb
Disk 0 partition 4 960 Mb
w/ them being separated by Partition C, now at 131 Gb (after
shrinking). Plus there is of course unallocated sectors as well as the Recovery partition.

My guess is that the first likely constitutes the boot sectors. Where
does one install a Boot Manager? And what BM would one use? I'm sure Arca Noae has already researched this for 5.1, but I'm ignorant of which one would be used.

Of Course GRUB can be installed in the partition for LMDE 4 once the
disk is partitioned and it is installed, and it usually offers the option to boot to a Windows version, but this interim method seems a bit awkward. Any suggestions?

Search pin 'EFI' boot managers, and dig into the topic :-)


Re: DFSee Support discussion forum and mailing list - Digest #33

Felix Miata
 

Wayne A. Smith composed on 2021-10-10 18:06 (UTC-0400):

I note that it doesn't allow creating an image of the ESP partition. I
will worry later about how to save it.
ESP partitions normally only have files with no special attributes. The file count
is few, and the sizes modest. You can zip the partition's content, later unzip
into any FAT32 'ESP' partition. Or, simply copy the content to a convenient
location, then copy back.

(The problem of course w/ flash
drives, unlike the old floppies or Iomega 100 Mb drives is that they can't
be labeled and figured out what is on which is always a chore.)
It's common for flash drives to have a place to tie a stringed or ringed tag,
definitely not as convenient as writing directly on, but better than nothing. All
my PCs have OM drives, to help keep need for flash drives to a minimum.
--
Evolution as taught in public schools is, like religion,
based on faith, not based on science.

Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409 ** a11y rocks!

Felix Miata


Re: DFSee Support discussion forum and mailing list - Digest #33

Wayne A. Smith
 

Thanks Lewis,

It turns out the main problem I had after my message was finding a frigging flash drive ... Living in the sticks the only close store that used to sell them now only offers SDHC Cards (the Darn Cellphone obsession strikes again) ...

Fortunately I finally found one that consisted of a Lenovo Recovery Disk - something that I see no need for now w/ DFSee backups - and so moved the files to a temporary depository, downloaded the DFSPUP64 image, created the disk, disabled Secure Boot, and enable Legacy Boot (though still w/ UEFI priority) on the GPT computer, booted it, and I was on my way!

The new interface is pretty fancy. The screens as images are being created is more than a bit different but I expect this is due to the difference in partition type. The menus all look the same, and Jan did a bang-up job w/ the upgrades of DFSee for GPT and the Puppy Linux interface.

I am as I write now creating an image of the Win 10 partition. I then will finish w/ images of the remaining partitions.

I note that it doesn't allow creating an image of the ESP partition. I will worry later about how to save it.

On your final point I played w/ the idea of formatting my other Puppy Linux drive for DFSPUP64. But I decided that, since it works well on my other computer, it would be foolish to do so since the EOL status warnings on my Linux platforms keep saying they may not work after awhile - and I use them to backup my ArcaOS OS and application partitions - and then I would need the Old Puppy Linux drive for them.

Though I have both now I also decided to go ahead and order both the 32 Bit and 64 Bit Puppy drives from Mensys. (The problem of course w/ flash drives, unlike the old floppies or Iomega 100 Mb drives is that they can't be labeled and figured out what is on which is always a chore.) Haing the branded drives should amke it easier. Plus, the purchase should keep Jan happy ...

On Sat, 09 Oct 2021 21:01:15 -0700 dfsee-support@groups.io wrote:

Can the DFSPUP64 be created from a current DFS version on an ArcaOS 32
Bit computer? (My version on this computer is only 16.5, but Help does give the option to "Get DFSPUP64 UEFI capable IMZ", so it seems this ought to work.)
Yes, absolutely. What you use to put the image on the stick is immaterial; you can even create a bootable DFSPUP64 stick from DFSee running under 16-bit DOS (I think; at least, any obstacle would be something other than the *content* of the image).

The 64-bit boot stick will boot a 64-bit system. The 32-bit boot stick will boot a 32-bit or a 64-bit system (in 32-bit mode). You can't *boot* a 32-bit system with a 64-bit OS kernel, however, and that's the one thing to bear in mind.

The 32-bit stick (DFSPUP32) is the most versatile, if you may be using it for older *and* newer systems.

HTH


Re: HPFS partition full

Jan van Wijk; DFSee support
 

Hi Fred,

On 9 Oct 2021, at 03:19, Fred J. Tydeman <tydeman@tybor.com> wrote:



Aside: I did use GammaTech GTU4.02's hpfsopt.exe and it did not help with
having dfsee shrink the partition.
Then the utility probably focusses on DEFRAGMENTING only, with the often also inoplemented compacting of the data areas towards the beginning of the partition. (Freeing up the end)

Regards, JvW

=============================================
Jan van Wijk; author of DFsee; https://www.dfsee.com


Re: GPT Boot Manager

Jan van Wijk; DFSee support
 

Hi Wayne,

On 9 Oct 2021, at 19:47, Wayne A. Smith <waynesmith@philosophical-vistas.net> wrote:

One last pain-in-the neck question from me. (While not directly pertaining to DFSee - though it does allow manipulation on GPT and UEFI systems - a post in a Linux or Windows forum likely would be met w/ ?? as each would usually be unaware of the other, much less OS/2.)
Indeed

Although UEFI (as a BIOS replacement) is supposed to be completely OS independent :-)

After research I discovered that Air Boot is not GPT aware. Likewise I understand that IBM Boot Manager would not work on this GPT 1Tb drive. I have learned that there is something called EFI but I have no idea if it is relevant or how to configure it.
Yes, there is.
UEFI actually puts a little more system function into it than BIOS, and that includes OS-neutral utilities that run from the so called EFI-system-partition. (A FAT32 disguised with another partition type)

This partition also contains the first-step loader for the operating system(s), and when there are more that can include a bootmanager. Of which there are several available.

These run in EFI mode, so are NOT Windows, Linux or any other OS compatible executables!


That said, I am certainly not an expert on this, have not experimented with it yet, since solar my systems have been single-OS.



The current layout of the drive shows
Disk 0 partition1 260 Mb
Disk 0 partition 4 960 Mb
w/ them being separated by Partition C, now at 131 Gb (after shrinking). Plus there is of course unallocated sectors as well as the Recovery partition.

My guess is that the first likely constitutes the boot sectors. Where does one install a Boot Manager? And what BM would one use? I'm sure Arca Noae has already researched this for 5.1, but I'm ignorant of which one would be used.

Of Course GRUB can be installed in the partition for LMDE 4 once the disk is partitioned and it is installed, and it usually offers the option to boot to a Windows version, but this interim method seems a bit awkward. Any suggestions?

Search pin ‘EFI’ boot managers, and dig into the topic :-)


Finally, on a question pertinent to DFSee, I understand it allows expanding partitions on GPT drives. Does this apply to an NTFS partition? I ask this as I think I got carried away w/ the shrinking by about 20 or 30 Gb, and the Expand option in Win 10 is not as transparent as the Shrink one.
Well, it SHOULD work, since expanding NTFS worked on MBR, and updating the partition tables for an expansion is relatively easy on GPT tables. I have not personally tested this though, I only did shrinking.


Thanks in advance for any help, and I apologize for any tangential issues raised.

You’re welcome. And no problem!

Regards, JvW

=============================================
Jan van Wijk; author of DFsee; https://www.dfsee.com


Re: Version 16.8

Lewis G Rosenthal
 

Hi, Wayne...

On 10/09/21 01:14 pm, Wayne A. Smith wrote:
After checking the Website, it appears a PFSPUP64 may be required. (Probably then I should keep the old drive, for older computers, and create a new one.)
If you are booting on a 64-bit-capable system and/or you have a need for booting in UEFI "mode," then DFSPUP64 is the best choice.

If you have a non-64-bit-capable system, you *must* use DFSPUP32 or DFSPUPPY, and the system must be configured to boot in traditional BIOS "mode" (often listed as "Legacy Boot").

Can the DFSPUP64 be created from a current DFS version on an ArcaOS 32 Bit computer? (My version on this computer is only 16.5, but Help does give the option to "Get DFSPUP64 UEFI capable IMZ", so it seems this ought to work.)
Yes, absolutely. What you use to put the image on the stick is immaterial; you can even create a bootable DFSPUP64 stick from DFSee running under 16-bit DOS (I think; at least, any obstacle would be something other than the *content* of the image).

The 64-bit boot stick will boot a 64-bit system. The 32-bit boot stick will boot a 32-bit or a 64-bit system (in 32-bit mode). You can't *boot* a 32-bit system with a 64-bit OS kernel, however, and that's the one thing to bear in mind.

The 32-bit stick (DFSPUP32) is the most versatile, if you may be using it for older *and* newer systems.

HTH

--
Lewis
-------------------------------------------------------------
Lewis G Rosenthal, CNA, CLP, CLE, CWTS, EA
Rosenthal & Rosenthal, LLC www.2rosenthals.com
visit my IT blog www.2rosenthals.net/wordpress
-------------------------------------------------------------


GPT Boot Manager

Wayne A. Smith
 

One last pain-in-the neck question from me. (While not directly pertaining to DFSee - though it does allow manipulation on GPT and UEFI systems - a post in a Linux or Windows forum likely would be met w/ ?? as each would usually be unaware of the other, much less OS/2.)

After research I discovered that Air Boot is not GPT aware. Likewise I understand that IBM Boot Manager would not work on this GPT 1Tb drive. I have learned that there is something called EFI but I have no idea if it is relevant or how to configure it.

The current layout of the drive shows
Disk 0 partition1 260 Mb
Disk 0 partition 4 960 Mb
w/ them being separated by Partition C, now at 131 Gb (after shrinking). Plus there is of course unallocated sectors as well as the Recovery partition.

My guess is that the first likely constitutes the boot sectors. Where does one install a Boot Manager? And what BM would one use? I'm sure Arca Noae has already researched this for 5.1, but I'm ignorant of which one would be used.

Of Course GRUB can be installed in the partition for LMDE 4 once the disk is partitioned and it is installed, and it usually offers the option to boot to a Windows version, but this interim method seems a bit awkward. Any suggestions?


Finally, on a question pertinent to DFSee, I understand it allows expanding partitions on GPT drives. Does this apply to an NTFS partition? I ask this as I think I got carried away w/ the shrinking by about 20 or 30 Gb, and the Expand option in Win 10 is not as transparent as the Shrink one.

Thanks in advance for any help, and I apologize for any tangential issues raised.


Re: Version 16.8

Wayne A. Smith
 

After checking the Website, it appears a PFSPUP64 may be required. (Probably then I should keep the old drive, for older computers, and create a new one.)

Can the DFSPUP64 be created from a current DFS version on an ArcaOS 32 Bit computer? (My version on this computer is only 16.5, but Help does give the option to "Get DFSPUP64 UEFI capable IMZ", so it seems this ought to work.)

On Sat, 09 Oct 2021 12:34:03 -0400 (EDT) Wayne A. Smith wrote:

Along the lines of the below, in which version did DFSee become GPT agnostic?

I inherited an HP Pavilion, w/ Win 10, 64 bit, installed, from an old friend who wasn't using it as he had migrated to MacOS hardware. Though offered before, I became interested after
the Warpstock presentation announcing the upcoming 5.1 and Linux Mint Debian complaining that I should upgrade to the latest version (a clean install on a different computer
seeming easier).

My Puppy Linux thumb drive is Version 6.3.2, w/ DFSee 14.11 installed on it. Is this new enough to allow partition backup and creation on a GPT drive? (This likely is an elementary
question to many, but having never before had a GPT drive computer it's "news to me".)


On Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:01:55 -0700 dfsee-support@groups.io wrote:

...

The only two changes was a rebuild using the official MIT-licenced TxLib
library (formal open source now)
And the addition of an 'AOS1' symbolic GPT partition type, that matches
the UUID used by ArcaOS for its GPT container partitions for upcoming ArcaOs versions.

Regards, JvW


Re: Version 16.8

Wayne A. Smith
 

Along the lines of the below, in which version did DFSee become GPT agnostic?

I inherited an HP Pavilion, w/ Win 10, 64 bit, installed, from an old friend who wasn't using it as he had migrated to MacOS hardware. Though offered before, I became interested after the Warpstock presentation announcing the upcoming 5.1 and Linux Mint Debian complaining that I should upgrade to the latest version (a clean install on a different computer seeming easier).

My Puppy Linux thumb drive is Version 6.3.2, w/ DFSee 14.11 installed on it. Is this new enough to allow partition backup and creation on a GPT drive? (This likely is an elementary question to many, but having never before had a GPT drive computer it's "news to me".)

On Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:01:55 -0700 dfsee-support@groups.io wrote:

...

The only two changes was a rebuild using the official MIT-licenced TxLib library (formal open source now)
And the addition of an 'AOS1' symbolic GPT partition type, that matches the UUID used by ArcaOS for its GPT container partitions for upcoming ArcaOs versions.

Regards, JvW


Re: HPFS partition full

Steven
 

In <100.58df090020fc6061.003@tybor.com>, on 10/08/21
at 06:19 PM, "Fred J. Tydeman" <tydeman@tybor.com> said:

Hi Fred,

I am trying this. But, when I do: "format N: /FS:HPFS"
I get the SYS0540 error.
Since my C: and G: partitions are HPFS, and there is IFS=C:\OS2\HPFS.IFS
in config.sys, I do not understand why I am getting that error. "help
sys0540" did not help any.
Format is implemented by UHPFS.DLL, not HPFS.IFS. The message is telling
you that for some reason FORMAT.COM cannot load UHPFS.DLL.

If you continue to have issues, I recommend you grab a copy of testlog
and attach a copy of the

testlog generic

report here. The testlog section of:

https://www.arcanoae.com/wiki/producing-diagnostic-log-files/

will explain how to use testlog and where to get a copy.

Aside: I did use GammaTech GTU4.02's hpfsopt.exe and it did not help
with having dfsee shrink the partition.
As I mentioned, this is expected. The space used to track extents is
minimal.

Steven

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
"Steven Levine" <steve53@earthlink.net> Warp/DIY/BlueLion etc.
www.scoug.com www.arcanoae.com www.warpcave.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------


Re: HPFS partition full

Fred J. Tydeman
 

On Fri, 8 Oct 2021 11:33:36 +0200 Jan van Wijk; DFSee support via groups.io wrote:

I would fix it by the famous backup/restore procedure :-)

Create a new (preferably BIGGER) partition, format that, and copy the contents over, then delete the old one.
I am trying this. But, when I do: "format N: /FS:HPFS"
I get the SYS0540 error.
Since my C: and G: partitions are HPFS, and there is IFS=C:\OS2\HPFS.IFS
in config.sys, I do not understand why I am getting that error.
"help sys0540" did not help any.

Aside: I did use GammaTech GTU4.02's hpfsopt.exe and it did not help with
having dfsee shrink the partition.


---
Fred J. Tydeman Tydeman Consulting
tydeman@tybor.com Testing, numerics, programming
+1 (702) 608-6093 Vice-chair of PL22.11 (ANSI "C")
Sample C99+FPCE tests: http://www.tybor.com
Savers sleep well, investors eat well, spenders work forever.

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