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File /CS-xxV Documents/Pitfalls of Building CSxxV.pdf uploaded #file-notice


crkits@groups.io Notification <crkits@...>
 

The following files have been uploaded to the Files area of the crkits@groups.io group.

By: Adam Rong

Description:
Here I list the pitfalls of building CS-xxV SSB Transceiver Kit to help the builders.


Gwen Patton
 

Regarding the pitfalls...

These are things one should GENERALLY do with a kit they're building. And, not to be overly pedantic, but while yes, using wire with two different colors of enamel makes a bifilar winding easier, are people SERIOUSLY not checking continuity on their windings with a meter? I've ALWAYS done that! Strip, sand, tin, and ring out with a continuity tester to make 100% certain that the wires a) didn't break somewhere in the windings and b) which wire is which. Then tag with a little strip of masking tape, electrical tape, or even Kaptan tape.

But then, I used to do mains wiring with my father, and did construction work while at college as an electrician. My college required every student living on campus to work on campus, and applied it to the room & board cost, pretty much negating it and cutting the cost of a year of school pretty much in half. I worked as an electrician the first year on the campus swimming pool annex. There were plenty of females on the work team, including a couple who were the best masons I've ever seen. They went on to become union masonry workers after graduation. I got tired of sitting precariously on top of walls 8 meters in the air, pulling wire through conduits in a high, hung ceiling, and worked in other departments in further years.

When I saw their methodology, I just about screamed and asked if I could PLEASE rework it, as with the method they were using they were wasting a LOT of time and effort. Basically, when I first got there, they were pulling an entire run, wiring up the junction boxes, and putting on the covers, THEN testing the WHOLE run end-to-end. Sure enough, they'd run into a problem at least half the time, and had to take the whole run apart to find out where it was failing. I simply had my crew run one SEGMENT of a run, test continuity on that segment, and test each wire to make sure it was NOT shorted to ground or to any other wire. If all tests passed, that segment was marked done, and we did the next segment in the run. When THAT segment passed, we connected up the junction box between those two segments, tested the two now connected segments for continuity and shorts. If it failed we knew where the error was -- in the junction box. If the wires all tested for continuity in each segment, but failed together when wired together, the fault couldn't be anywhere BUT in the junction. With this system, we would always know for certain where  an error was, and could fix it right away. We cut days off the scheduled time for that run, just not having to take everything apart for a simple failure to screw a wire-nut on properly.

Well, we first did a controlled test of the method, with my team doing it MY way, while the rest of the crew continued with the OLD way. It was during this time that a major run was completed to the breaker panel, and they decided to do a smoke test on it with live current. When the team head threw the breaker, it EXPLODED out of the breaker panel, nearly hitting him in the face, slammed into the far wall, and fell to the concrete floor ON FIRE. We killed the main and started looking for faults. Turns out that the guy they assigned to wire the main junction box for that run was a complete idiot. There were at least 12 color-coded pairs of wires in that box, and rather than wiring them color to color like any actually sapient being would do, he stripped ALL the wires back a couple inches, twisted them ALL together in a single big knot, then wrapped it in electrical tape because they don't make a wire-nut that big. Then he stuffed it all in the box and screwed the lid down. The crew head who almost got his brains splattered by a ballistic pyrotechnic circuit breaker to the face almost ripped the guy in half. The guy got sent to work in the kitchen, where they thought he couldn't cause trouble (he found ways, usually by stealing food and hiding behind the walk-ins to eat it and hide from doing work).

When they saw my crew sitting around, swapping stories instead of working, they pitched a fit that we were "shirking". We produced the plan that showed WE were DONE. Why were they taking so long?

They instituted my method of installation immediately. It cut months of wasted effort from the operation. I was gobsmacked, because it wasn't such a big thing, just cutting down on the potential problems with more appropriate testing. I hadn't realized that they were having problems in other areas, such as not lubing wire bundles going through conduits, so they'd have 2-3 wires either pulled in half or worse, stripped halfway down against the edge of a conduit connector in a junction box in the middle, and would have to pull it ALL out and re-pull the run. And might have to do it yet AGAIN because they STILL hadn't lubed the bundle. Turns out they didn't even know that lubing the wires was a thing, as most of them had worked with pre-wired BX cable, and had never pulled wire through a conduit before. I had, and not even on a job, just helping my dad wire the house and the addition to the garage.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
73,
Gwen, NG3P


On Sun, Sep 13, 2020 at 9:09 AM crkits@groups.io Notification <crkits@groups.io> wrote:

The following files have been uploaded to the Files area of the crkits@groups.io group.

By: Adam Rong

Description:
Here I list the pitfalls of building CS-xxV SSB Transceiver Kit to help the builders.


Adam Rong
 

Gwen,

I remember JL1KRA told me someone glued parts to the PCB to build a kit. Although I have tried to write instructions with photos, people still go wrong. That's why I write about pitfalls to help the builder.

Someone may ask why I am still playing around the VXO type NE602 radio kit. Crystal controlled radio is low noise and clear and NE602 radio is easy to build.

Thanks,
Adam


Gwen Patton
 

Adam,

Unfortunately, I can readily imagine someone trying to glue the parts to the PCB... _shaking my head sadly._

You're right... Continue to give those suggestions.

73,
Gwen, NG3P

On Mon, Sep 14, 2020, 9:42 AM Adam Rong <rongxh@...> wrote:
Gwen,

I remember JL1KRA told me someone glued parts to the PCB to build a kit. Although I have tried to write instructions with photos, people still go wrong. That's why I write about pitfalls to help the builder.

Someone may ask why I am still playing around the VXO type NE602 radio kit. Crystal controlled radio is low noise and clear and NE602 radio is easy to build.

Thanks,
Adam


Erick
 

Hi Adam,

Although obvious to many, I think it's nice to include the non-obvious. I would assume kit builders vary in experience and understanding. Sometimes stating the obvious doesn't hurt. I love to see build manuals of other kits (radio or electronics) and notice many have repetitive suggestions... sometimes when you are building kits you go into autopilot and just follow the instructions..if an instruction is omitted, you may forget the obvious.

One kit builder always includes magnet wire that can have the insulation easily burned off...so they suggest to simply leave the iron on the wire for a few seconds to burn off. Not all wire will react that way, so those with experience will sand/scrape the enamel off and sometimes tin before insertion. 

Another one gives the same recommendations on how to separate parts, to do inventory, and a super quick "how to solder" instruction. I love seeing the "don't throw your antenna on electrical wires" recommendation..... sometimes you have to protect people against themselves.

While annoying to document, I have found extremely detailed build instructions to be useful. Those with experience will simply roll their eyes, but you will avoid potential issues for the less experienced -- and the time invested in the document may mean less support emails :-)

In my case, I would rather avoid EXTRA obvious information than LESS information.

Thanks


--
Erick Dahan (VE2LRZ) CISM CISA CISSP CRISC



On Mon, Sep 14, 2020 at 9:42 AM Adam Rong <rongxh@...> wrote:
Gwen,

I remember JL1KRA told me someone glued parts to the PCB to build a kit. Although I have tried to write instructions with photos, people still go wrong. That's why I write about pitfalls to help the builder.

Someone may ask why I am still playing around the VXO type NE602 radio kit. Crystal controlled radio is low noise and clear and NE602 radio is easy to build.

Thanks,
Adam


rjtoegel@gmail.com
 

I my opinion, nothing cleaner sounding than a direct conversion receiver with a crystal or VXO oscillator.  Also simpler too.  Less things to go wrong.

Bob

On Mon, Sep 14, 2020, 10:13 Erick <EDAHAN@...> wrote:
Hi Adam,

Although obvious to many, I think it's nice to include the non-obvious. I would assume kit builders vary in experience and understanding. Sometimes stating the obvious doesn't hurt. I love to see build manuals of other kits (radio or electronics) and notice many have repetitive suggestions... sometimes when you are building kits you go into autopilot and just follow the instructions..if an instruction is omitted, you may forget the obvious.

One kit builder always includes magnet wire that can have the insulation easily burned off...so they suggest to simply leave the iron on the wire for a few seconds to burn off. Not all wire will react that way, so those with experience will sand/scrape the enamel off and sometimes tin before insertion. 

Another one gives the same recommendations on how to separate parts, to do inventory, and a super quick "how to solder" instruction. I love seeing the "don't throw your antenna on electrical wires" recommendation..... sometimes you have to protect people against themselves.

While annoying to document, I have found extremely detailed build instructions to be useful. Those with experience will simply roll their eyes, but you will avoid potential issues for the less experienced -- and the time invested in the document may mean less support emails :-)

In my case, I would rather avoid EXTRA obvious information than LESS information.

Thanks


--
Erick Dahan (VE2LRZ) CISM CISA CISSP CRISC



On Mon, Sep 14, 2020 at 9:42 AM Adam Rong <rongxh@...> wrote:
Gwen,

I remember JL1KRA told me someone glued parts to the PCB to build a kit. Although I have tried to write instructions with photos, people still go wrong. That's why I write about pitfalls to help the builder.

Someone may ask why I am still playing around the VXO type NE602 radio kit. Crystal controlled radio is low noise and clear and NE602 radio is easy to build.

Thanks,
Adam


Adam Rong
 

Bob,

True. You can read this story about DC RX.

在 2020年9月14日,下午11:36,"rjtoegel@..." <rjtoegel@...> 写道:


I my opinion, nothing cleaner sounding than a direct conversion receiver with a crystal or VXO oscillator.  Also simpler too.  Less things to go wrong.

Bob

On Mon, Sep 14, 2020, 10:13 Erick <EDAHAN@...> wrote:
Hi Adam,

Although obvious to many, I think it's nice to include the non-obvious. I would assume kit builders vary in experience and understanding. Sometimes stating the obvious doesn't hurt. I love to see build manuals of other kits (radio or electronics) and notice many have repetitive suggestions... sometimes when you are building kits you go into autopilot and just follow the instructions..if an instruction is omitted, you may forget the obvious.

One kit builder always includes magnet wire that can have the insulation easily burned off...so they suggest to simply leave the iron on the wire for a few seconds to burn off. Not all wire will react that way, so those with experience will sand/scrape the enamel off and sometimes tin before insertion. 

Another one gives the same recommendations on how to separate parts, to do inventory, and a super quick "how to solder" instruction. I love seeing the "don't throw your antenna on electrical wires" recommendation..... sometimes you have to protect people against themselves.

While annoying to document, I have found extremely detailed build instructions to be useful. Those with experience will simply roll their eyes, but you will avoid potential issues for the less experienced -- and the time invested in the document may mean less support emails :-)

In my case, I would rather avoid EXTRA obvious information than LESS information.

Thanks


--
Erick Dahan (VE2LRZ) CISM CISA CISSP CRISC



On Mon, Sep 14, 2020 at 9:42 AM Adam Rong <rongxh@...> wrote:
Gwen,

I remember JL1KRA told me someone glued parts to the PCB to build a kit. Although I have tried to write instructions with photos, people still go wrong. That's why I write about pitfalls to help the builder.

Someone may ask why I am still playing around the VXO type NE602 radio kit. Crystal controlled radio is low noise and clear and NE602 radio is easy to build.

Thanks,
Adam


Gary Freeman
 

Hello,

 

Some hams in the US have built exact replicas of the original 1968 DC receivers.  They still sound great!

 

73 de Gary W0ITT

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Adam Rong
Sent: Monday, September 14, 2020 12:25 PM
To: crkits@groups.io
Subject: Re: [crkits] File /CS-xxV Documents/Pitfalls of Building CSxxV.pdf uploaded #file-notice

 

Bob,

 

True. You can read this story about DC RX.

 

http://w7zoi.net/dcrx68a.pdf

Thanks,

Adam



2020914日,下午11:36"rjtoegel@..." <rjtoegel@...> 写道:



I my opinion, nothing cleaner sounding than a direct conversion receiver with a crystal or VXO oscillator.  Also simpler too.  Less things to go wrong.

 

Bob

 

On Mon, Sep 14, 2020, 10:13 Erick <EDAHAN@...> wrote:

Hi Adam,

 

Although obvious to many, I think it's nice to include the non-obvious. I would assume kit builders vary in experience and understanding. Sometimes stating the obvious doesn't hurt. I love to see build manuals of other kits (radio or electronics) and notice many have repetitive suggestions... sometimes when you are building kits you go into autopilot and just follow the instructions..if an instruction is omitted, you may forget the obvious.

 

One kit builder always includes magnet wire that can have the insulation easily burned off...so they suggest to simply leave the iron on the wire for a few seconds to burn off. Not all wire will react that way, so those with experience will sand/scrape the enamel off and sometimes tin before insertion. 

 

Another one gives the same recommendations on how to separate parts, to do inventory, and a super quick "how to solder" instruction. I love seeing the "don't throw your antenna on electrical wires" recommendation..... sometimes you have to protect people against themselves.

 

While annoying to document, I have found extremely detailed build instructions to be useful. Those with experience will simply roll their eyes, but you will avoid potential issues for the less experienced -- and the time invested in the document may mean less support emails :-)

 

In my case, I would rather avoid EXTRA obvious information than LESS information.

 

Thanks

 


--
Erick Dahan
(VE2LRZ) CISM CISA CISSP CRISC

 

 

 

On Mon, Sep 14, 2020 at 9:42 AM Adam Rong <rongxh@...> wrote:

Gwen,

I remember JL1KRA told me someone glued parts to the PCB to build a kit. Although I have tried to write instructions with photos, people still go wrong. That's why I write about pitfalls to help the builder.

Someone may ask why I am still playing around the VXO type NE602 radio kit. Crystal controlled radio is low noise and clear and NE602 radio is easy to build.

Thanks,
Adam

 


Adam Rong
 

Speaking of DC RX, I made a CA3028 DC RX kit. I have sold a few to Japan and China local, and they say they love it. The circuit is simpler than the regular CA3028 circuit by using a colpitts oscillator. You can modify to VXO type easily with PCB support. I am selling the board kit of 7025 crystal (best for 7023 receiving) at 12 USD including regular air shipping to the worldwide, if someone is interested. PayPal to rongxh@... and leave your ship to address.

https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/SmK9M8yo6ouVXAv--Ht1oQ

Thanks,
Adam