Topics

1802 Forth? MSI 88/e?

Mark Graybill <saundby@...>
 

Some of us were working on mapping it, and there are some files with
incomplete work in the files area. I diverted my time into starting a
classic Elf, then my time got diverted for me so I haven't gotten any
further with either project in some time (though I have a couple of students
who have basic 256B Elfs now. We're preparing for memory and front panel
upgrades on those.)

Hopefully an upcoming project milestone at work will allow me to regain time
to either work on the MSI88/E or my own Elf or both. Until then, back to
lurking...

-Mark G.

----- Original Message -----
From: "dfnr2" <@dfnr2>
To: <cosmacelf@...>
Sent: Sunday, November 02, 2003 11:47 AM
Subject: [cosmacelf] 1802 Forth? MSI 88/e?


Hello,

I got one of the MSI 88/e handhelds from Electronic Goldmine a while
back, and was wondering if anyone has done anything interesting with
this unit. Has anyone worked out the addressing, etc? I'd like to
replace the EPROM with a 4K forth (if I can find a copy of FIG-FORTH),
with bit-banged serial (via a max232), and use that as a starting
point to map out the display & keyboard circuits interactively. With
the right software, this could be a nifty little system, since it's
got 32K RAM, a keyboard, display, and (mechanically clunky) bus
connectors.

dave



========================================================
Visit the COSMAC ELF website at http://www.cosmacelf.com, or view the
Wiki/FAQ at http://1802.bitting.com/

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
cosmacelf-unsubscribe@...



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


 

Hello,

I got one of the MSI 88/e handhelds from Electronic Goldmine a while
back, and was wondering if anyone has done anything interesting with
this unit. Has anyone worked out the addressing, etc? I'd like to
replace the EPROM with a 4K forth (if I can find a copy of FIG-FORTH),
with bit-banged serial (via a max232), and use that as a starting
point to map out the display & keyboard circuits interactively. With
the right software, this could be a nifty little system, since it's
got 32K RAM, a keyboard, display, and (mechanically clunky) bus
connectors.

dave