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Your Phone Wasn’t Built for the Apocalypse


allan.konopka@...
 


Rick Gordon
 

Isn't the repeated "Camera sensors are color-blind—they see only brightness" statement a bit misleading?

I don't claim deep knowledge on the Bayer sensor technology, but it seems that registering brightness onto red, green, and blue sensors, and interpolating the values (with some consideration of edge effects) is, in effect, "seeing" color — and with basic similarities to the way that photoreceptors in the eye work. No?

Rick Gordon

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On September 11, 2020 at 2:29:28 PM [-0700], Allan Konopka wrote in an email entitled "[colortheory] Your Phone Wasn’t Built for the Apocalypse":
Just for Friday fun ...
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2020/09/camera-phone-wildfire-sky/616279/_._,_._,_
___________________________________________
RICK GORDON
EMERALD VALLEY GRAPHICS AND CONSULTING
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WWW: http://www.shelterpub.com


Rick Gordon
 

Now, white balance algorithms — also considered in the article — is obviously a key issue.

Rick Gordon
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On September 11, 2020 at 2:38:56 PM [-0700], Rick Gordon wrote in an email entitled "Re: [colortheory] Your Phone Wasn’t Built for the Apocalypse":
Isn't the repeated "Camera sensors are color-blind—they see only brightness" statement a bit misleading?

I don't claim deep knowledge on the Bayer sensor technology, but it seems that registering brightness onto red, green, and blue sensors, and interpolating the values (with some consideration of edge effects) is, in effect, "seeing" color — and with basic similarities to the way that photoreceptors in the eye work. No?

Rick Gordon
,_._,_
___________________________________________
RICK GORDON
EMERALD VALLEY GRAPHICS AND CONSULTING
___________________________________________
WWW: http://www.shelterpub.com


James Gray
 


Rick Gordon via groups.io 

3:37 PM (29 minutes ago)
to colortheory
RG:  Isn't the repeated "Camera sensors are color-blind—they see only brightness" statement a bit misleading?

JG:  I never heard this phrase before today.  I think it is more than a bit misleading.  Perhaps it is because of a bit of ambiguity as to what a "camera sensor" is.  Is it the whole Bayer array that consists of 42 megapixels or is it just one sensor for one pixel?  The Bayer array is clearly not color blind.  Color is detected by having colored filters over individual sensors.  The individual sensors could be said to be color blind.

RG:  I don't claim deep knowledge on the Bayer sensor technology, but it seems that registering brightness onto red, green, and blue sensors, and interpolating the values (with some consideration of edge effects) is, in effect, "seeing" color — and with basic similarities to the way that photoreceptors in the eye work. No?

JG:  There is an important similarity in how the eye works.  However, the eye has 4 types of sensors.  There are 3 types of cones and there are rods.  The 3 types of cones have maximal sensitivity in the blue, green, and yellow part of the visual spectrum respectively.  Special kinds of cells in the retina process the firing of individual cones to produce the sensations of  blue-yellow and red-green.

James Gray


kirkthibault
 

No matter how smart or artificially intelligenced a camera is or will be, it will not be able to predict the intent of the person operating it.  It is like a camera’s meter that attempts to read middle gray without knowing what it is pointing at when the reading is taken, causing snow and a black cat  look gray.

Kirk Thibault


Henry Davis
 

I hear you, but that applies to film cameras, no? Really, I agree - but somebody’s going to say it.

Henry Davis

On Sep 11, 2020, at 7:26 PM, kirkthibault via groups.io <kirkthibault=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

No matter how smart or artificially intelligenced a camera is or will be, it will not be able to predict the intent of the person operating it. It is like a camera’s meter that attempts to read middle gray without knowing what it is pointing at when the reading is taken, causing snow and a black cat look gray.

Kirk Thibault


B Rowland
 

Well, the phone,or dslr, these days, can deduce a LOT about a scene, much more than the "grey point" of light meters of 'my day' ;-) , so that one has a relatively good chance of not having breh snow or a breh black cat, and mot cameras, or phones, with electronic viewfinders, can provide real time images that reflect changes in white balance, colour temperature, exposure compensation, et al, so that the photographer's 'intent' can be pretty accurately rendered...not deduced or presumed, of course ;-)


On September 12, 2020 4:49:10 AM GMT+02:00, Henry Davis <davishr@...> wrote:
I hear you, but that applies to film cameras, no?  Really, I agree - but somebody’s going to say it.

Henry Davis

On Sep 11, 2020, at 7:26 PM, kirkthibault via groups.io <kirkthibault@...> wrote:

No matter how smart or artificially intelligenced a camera is or will be, it will not be able to predict the intent of the person operating it. It is like a camera’s meter that attempts to read middle gray without knowing what it is pointing at when the reading is taken, causing snow and a black cat look gray.

Kirk Thibault

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