Topics

PPW alternate versions - how to compare them


Alec Dann
 

Dan,

At about 10:10 in your video on Chapter 5 - Color Boost, you make some moves to compare versions.  Can you tell me what you are doing there?  It's not evident in the video.

If you or the group have additional thoughts on the best way to compare versions, I'd be very interested.  

Thanks,

Alec


Thomas Hurd,MD
 

Alec,

Hold down the option key when you press CB in the PPW panel. You can release the button once the display appears. It will give you a choice of A>B, A=B, or B>A. If you click the buttons on the left, you can preview the different versions or options. If you would like to change the default you can make a selection on the right.

Tom Hurd

On Aug 7, 2020, at 4:48 PM, Alec Dann via groups.io <alec.dann@...> wrote:

Dan,

At about 10:10 in your video on Chapter 5 - Color Boost, you make some moves to compare versions.  Can you tell me what you are doing there?  It's not evident in the video.

If you or the group have additional thoughts on the best way to compare versions, I'd be very interested.  

Thanks,

Alec


Alec Dann
 

Thanks, Tom.  Good to be reminded of that option.

My comparisons are more focused on variations that derive from color and/or contrast correction done before the CB+MMM action.  They are processing threads that create entirely separate PPW results.

How would you compare those?  I could tile the various images in PS or use Compare or Survey views in Lightroom, but Dan's method in the video seemed faster and more elegant.

Alec


Arthur Margolin
 

Alec,

He layered one version top of the other. It looks like he then uses the shortcuts Ctrl+Z and Shift+Ctrl+Z to compare them (in Photoshop go to Edit and see the first two commands at the top).

Arthur 

On Sat, Aug 8, 2020 at 5:49 PM Alec Dann via groups.io <alec.dann=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks, Tom.  Good to be reminded of that option.

My comparisons are more focused on variations that derive from color and/or contrast correction done before the CB+MMM action.  They are processing threads that create entirely separate PPW results.

How would you compare those?  I could tile the various images in PS or use Compare or Survey views in Lightroom, but Dan's method in the video seemed faster and more elegant.

Alec


Alec Dann
 

Thanks, Arthur.  I think what confused me is that he is using Apply Image to bring the Luminosity channel from "First Try" into the top layer and he's toggling (just Command+Z in those days) between before and after Apply Image. 

I'd thought he'd somehow brought a flattened First Try layer (all the channels) into the Second Try image, but he just needed to compare Luminosity curves so he just brought in the Luminosity channel.  Answer my own question.

Thanks for your help.


Hector Davila
 

I wasn't aware you can do that...I use mostly Adobe CS5 and that option isn't available in that version.

Hector Davila

On 8/7/2020 2:14 PM, Thomas Hurd,MD via groups.io wrote:
Alec,

Hold down the option key when you press CB in the PPW panel. You can release the button once the display appears. It will give you a choice of A>B, A=B, or B>A. If you click the buttons on the left, you can preview the different versions or options. If you would like to change the default you can make a selection on the right.

Tom Hurd


k_d@...
 

And there is the venerable: layer one over the other, and set top layer mode to difference.
Where black, they are the same; otherwise you see the differences (be sure you have both layers perfectly aligned to use difference mode.)

Doug Schafer


Thomas Hurd,MD
 

Also not sure if this was explicit:

You can have whatever your current file is open. You can make a composite layer. Then use apply image on that layer to bring over whichever other (branched) version you are interested in. Click preview on and off.

Create a composite or stamped layer is not in the menu. You have to press command, option, shift and E. That creates a composite or stamped layer that represents your entire layer stack below.

So, you have Version  1, 2 and 3 all from the same default starting file open in Photoshop.
You can make a composite of Version 3. Then you make that composite layer active and pull down apply image from the image menu. You then select version one or two and then click preview.
You can then click preview off and on to compare the previous version to your current.

Or, you could make a composite layer on top of each version and drag a copy of that composite layer  from the file of interest to your active file’s layer stack, and toggle the layer on and off.

Tom Hurd

On Aug 9, 2020, at 6:57 PM, k_d@... wrote:

And there is the venerable: layer one over the other, and set top layer mode to difference.
Where black, they are the same; otherwise you see the differences (be sure you have both layers perfectly aligned to use difference mode.)

Doug Schafer


Thomas Hurd,MD
 

Also using option key works to give options for MMMCB action and also Bigger Hammer.

If you press option for MMM you can try 4 different selections.

For MMMCB you can choose two different selections and compare.

In Bigger hammer the big option is to pick which channel is used first. The default is red.

Every action in the PPW panel in blue has some option If you choose to use the option/alt key.

Tom Hurd

On Aug 9, 2020, at 8:25 PM, Thomas Hurd <tomhurd@...> wrote:


Also not sure if this was explicit:

You can have whatever your current file is open. You can make a composite layer. Then use apply image on that layer to bring over whichever other (branched) version you are interested in. Click preview on and off.

Create a composite or stamped layer is not in the menu. You have to press command, option, shift and E. That creates a composite or stamped layer that represents your entire layer stack below.

So, you have Version  1, 2 and 3 all from the same default starting file open in Photoshop.
You can make a composite of Version 3. Then you make that composite layer active and pull down apply image from the image menu. You then select version one or two and then click preview.
You can then click preview off and on to compare the previous version to your current.

Or, you could make a composite layer on top of each version and drag a copy of that composite layer  from the file of interest to your active file’s layer stack, and toggle the layer on and off.

Tom Hurd

On Aug 9, 2020, at 6:57 PM, k_d@... wrote:

And there is the venerable: layer one over the other, and set top layer mode to difference.
Where black, they are the same; otherwise you see the differences (be sure you have both layers perfectly aligned to use difference mode.)

Doug Schafer


Alec Dann
 

Thomas,

Great suggestions.

If I want to analyze the difference between an original red channel and a copy of that channel with the blue channel applied to it, what is the best way to see that?

Alec


k_d@...
 

"analyze the difference between an original red channel and a copy of that channel with the blue channel applied to it"

Select red channel, use apply image with blue channel,
BUT, before you close/accept, click preview on/off to your hearts content.

For a fixed view: copy red channel to new .psd doc, make a new red channel with blue applied and save as a layer over the red channel.psd,
then turn red/blue channel on/off;
or make the top layer as difference mode and observe: black means no difference, anything else shows the difference.
You can do this same thing in the .psd source but a separate.psd doc means you can save/test/adjust/export etc. and not risk messing up the source doc. and keep thinking separated between the 2 .psd files.

Doug Schafer


Thomas Hurd,MD
 

I like all the ways Doug described. Once you have used photoshop for a while, making this extra channels and files becomes second nature.

 Another way to try the changes to the red channel “risk free” inside the source doc:
Select the red channel so only it is visible
Right click duplicate channel default name “red copy” (You can name it anything  you like at this point or later).
This is now an alpha channel and can be manipulated without affecting your tri-channel image.
With the duplicate channel selected, you can use apply image to replace or blend with any other channel in that document (or another of equal dimensions.)
With the red channel copy, now modified initially with a blend, you can then use command-M curves, or any other image adjustment directly on the duplicate. Although technically it does not use reversible adjustment layers to modify it, you can use command Z to reverse, or go through history.
Another maneuver that Dan has demonstrated a few times in the past 11 weeks:
You can
1. blend the channel with different modes, overlay being particularly interesting with a and b channels from LAB
2. Immediately after pressing OK you can use Fade to cut back the effect, and/or again change blend modes.
3. You can also use drawing tools on the alpha channel, such as brush tool in grayscale, or dodge and burn, gradient, etc. and again, immediate after the tool maneuver you can use Fade.

Anytime you want to use the newly modified red channel as part of you image, switch back to Doug’s description, and use apply image to test out your new red channel. Then comman-Z, etc.

Warning: channel blending and other Channel operations can be very addicting.

Tom Hurd

On Aug 10, 2020, at 1:05 PM, k_d@... wrote:

"analyze the difference between an original red channel and a copy of that channel with the blue channel applied to it"

Select red channel, use apply image with blue channel,
BUT, before you close/accept, click preview on/off to your hearts content.

For a fixed view: copy red channel to new .psd doc, make a new red channel with blue applied and save as a layer over the red channel.psd,
then turn red/blue channel on/off;
or make the top layer as difference mode and observe: black means no difference, anything else shows the difference.
You can do this same thing in the .psd source but a separate.psd doc means you can save/test/adjust/export etc. and not risk messing up the source doc. and keep thinking separated between the 2 .psd files.

Doug Schafer


Alec Dann
 

Doug and Tom: great suggestions.  Thank you!

I think what I'm shooting for is to use the Difference blend mode (though Subtract in Appy Image would do).  I expect I can find my way there now.

Alec