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Pantone before Pantone


kirkthibault
 

I came across a write up of a fascinating volume of work published in the late 1600’s by a Dutch artist known as “A. Boogert” that is referred to by the title (in French) "Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau.”  Here is a link to one of several blurbs about the work:


Here is a link to high resolution scans of the entire massive handwritten volume:


which appears to note that the scan was performed in 2010.  Of particular note are the beautifully prepared pages of variations of color based on mixing recipes for watercolor pigments and water.  If nothing else, the work is visually stunning  in its own right and is an incredible achievement in the study of color.

Many of the articles about the work are dated in 2014, so this has been around for a while, but it is new to me, so I thought I’d share.

kirk thibault


Dan Margulis
 


Kirk Thibault writes,

I came across a write up of a fascinating volume of work published in the late 1600’s by a Dutch artist known as “A. Boogert” that is referred to by the title (in French) "Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau.”  Here is a link to one of several blurbs about the work:


Here is a link to high resolution scans of the entire massive handwritten volume:


which appears to note that the scan was performed in 2010.  Of particular note are the beautifully prepared pages of variations of color based on mixing recipes for watercolor pigments and water.  If nothing else, the work is visually stunning  in its own right and is an incredible achievement in the study of color.

It’s an interesting relic. I’ve never heard of it previously, probably for the very reason mentioned: it’s hand-prepared, only one copy exists.

Historically this is par for the course: printing color swatch books calls for a lot of quality control and great expense. This guy couldn’t have printed his swatches if he had wanted to. Later in the century it might have become possible if a billionaire could have been persuaded to finance it. Even today, the Pantone swatchbooks are probably money-losers for Pantone, and anybody else would find it out of the question to print them. 

Thanks for the link.

Dan Margulis


Henry Davis
 

It felt like a money loser to buy Pantone swatchbooks too, very pricey. A company where I worked bought a box of them, a dozen I think. They were very close - but they weren't an exact match. That always came to mind when a print buyer would complain that we hadn't matched a color exactly.

Henry Davis

On Oct 14, 2019, at 10:31 PM, dmargulis DMargulis@aol.com [COLORTHEORY] wrote:
<Snip>
Even today, the Pantone swatchbooks are probably money-losers for Pantone, and anybody else would find it out of the question to print them.