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One of the oldest Color Charts: The Table of Physiological Colors (1686)


jorgeparraphotography
 

Gang I just found it interesting to read about one of the oldest known Color Charts, based mostly on "naturalistic" physiological responses to describe colors but used as a reference for other academics and future studies on color, several decades before the more scientific approach by Chevreul.

https://www.openculture.com/2020/11/one-of-the-earliest-known-color-charts.html
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Jorge Parra 
www.jJorgeParraPhotography.com
Miami


Dan Margulis
 



On Dec 26, 2020, at 6:53 PM, jorgeparraphotography <jorgeparraphotography@...> wrote:

Gang I just found it interesting to read about one of the oldest known Color Charts, based mostly on "naturalistic" physiological responses to describe colors but used as a reference for other academics and future studies on color, several decades before the more scientific approach by Chevreul.

https://www.openculture.com/2020/11/one-of-the-earliest-known-color-charts.html
 

This is the seventeenth-century equivalent of a Pantone swatch book or a book of paint samples. It’s interesting because of its age, but it doesn’t add much to color theory, the way that Newton’s hypothetical color wheel did at about the same time, or Chevreul’s color hemisphere, or Munsell’s color tree did. All of these try to organize colors with their complementaries opposite them. The earliest known printed “wheel” of that description dates from 1709, a couple of decades after the chart referenced above.

Dan