Topics

Affinity Sale


Dan Margulis
 

The folks at Serif market, under the Affinity name, competitors to Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign (their corresponding names, respectively, are Photo, Designer, and Publisher). I have no experience with the latter two, but in February I sprang for $50 and bought a copy of Affinity Photo. It isimpressive, with several features that Photoshop lacks, like an LAB channel mixer. Since I’ve been using Photoshop for a bit longer, I’m not all that comfortable with Affinity Photo and am not qualified to do a serious comparison of the two programs. My impression, however, is that the two are quite close. If it weren’t for the PPW Panel, I’d be happy to make the switch, while reserving the right to switch back if it turned out to be less than expected.

I bring this up to point out that they’re running quite a sale now. Fairly early in the pandemic, they offered a special that they claimed was their way of supporting our profession in its hour of need. They would offer free trials for 90 days instead of the normal week or two or whatever, and also they would sell the software at half price. That sale ended when things seemed rather more hopeful than they do today. They just reinstated it, saying "Sadly, it’s clear that the pandemic continues to have a serious impact and so we’ve decided to bring back these offers once again."

Regardless of their motivation, we can for the moment buy one of these programs at roughly the same price as renting their Adobe equivalent for a month. That is not much of an investment. I don’t see that I am going to need a page-makeup program in the future but if I do I can’t imagine that I will want to rent InDesign. So I am likely to drop the $25 on Affinity Publisher. And, while I already have my copy, $25 doesn’t seem like a bad price for an emergency Photoshop backup.

https://affinity.serif.com

Dan


David Riecks
 

Dan:

I'd posted this offer to the folks on my ControlledVocabulary forum earlier this morning. I think it's a good opportunity for those who want to do some serious tire-kicking. I'd purchased Affinity Designer during the first deal last year, but didn't think that Affinity Photo was quite there, yet.  I will download this new 90 day trial and take a look to see if they have made improvements over what was in v1.8. 

My impression was that in terms of "pixel" manipulation it was quite decent, though more like Lightroom than Photoshop. The main issues I had were in how it handles and supports embedded metadata. For some users this may not matter, but for those of us with large image collections, making sure that our photo metadata is preserved can be a deal-killer in adopting new software into a workflo.

Affinity Photo had moved forward in that many of the fields you can enter in Photoshop's "File Info" (or Adobe Bridge) could now be seen in the user interface, however only a handful of them could be added or changed. These editable metadata fields were preserved (along with the other "un-editable" fields) in the files that were created on export. There was, however, no means to batch apply metadata, via a template (at least that I or other members of my forum could find). And I don't recall much within Affinity Photo that would allow one to use it as an image "manager" to find previous images. 

Here's an older thread on their user forums (from versions prior to v1.8 where it was "stripping" all the metadata, so they have made a major step forward.  https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/83432-metadata-for-images/  

Though for $24.99 per app you could do much worse. 

David

On 2021-01-19 13:36, Dan Margulis via groups.io wrote:

The folks at Serif market, under the Affinity name, competitors to Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign (their corresponding names, respectively, are Photo, Designer, and Publisher). I have no experience with the latter two, but in February I sprang for $50 and bought a copy of Affinity Photo. It isimpressive, with several features that Photoshop lacks, like an LAB channel mixer. Since I've been using Photoshop for a bit longer, I'm not all that comfortable with Affinity Photo and am not qualified to do a serious comparison of the two programs. My impression, however, is that the two are quite close. If it weren't for the PPW Panel, I'd be happy to make the switch, while reserving the right to switch back if it turned out to be less than expected.


-- 
David Riecks  (that's "i" before "e", but the "e" is silent)
Need Keywords for your database? Get the Controlled Vocabulary Solution
http://controlledvocabulary.com/products/ support for a dozen of the
most popular imaging applications from Adobe Bridge to Photo Mechanic.


Kent Sutorius
 

Dan,
I started photography and post-processing 2 years ago (retired last year). I didn't want to spring for a subscription with Photoshop so purchased Affinity Photo. I have completed 8 chapters of your Professional Photoshop (5th ed.) and 2 chapters of your LAB book using Affinity Photo.  Too bad I can't install the PPW Panel. Thank you for your books and hosting this colortheory group.

Kent


On 1/19/2021 2:36 PM, Dan Margulis via groups.io wrote:
The folks at Serif market, under the Affinity name, competitors to Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign (their corresponding names, respectively, are Photo, Designer, and Publisher). I have no experience with the latter two, but in February I sprang for $50 and bought a copy of Affinity Photo. It isimpressive, with several features that Photoshop lacks, like an LAB channel mixer. Since I’ve been using Photoshop for a bit longer, I’m not all that comfortable with Affinity Photo and am not qualified to do a serious comparison of the two programs. My impression, however, is that the two are quite close. If it weren’t for the PPW Panel, I’d be happy to make the switch, while reserving the right to switch back if it turned out to be less than expected.

I bring this up to point out that they’re running quite a sale now. Fairly early in the pandemic, they offered a special that they claimed was their way of supporting our profession in its hour of need. They would offer free trials for 90 days instead of the normal week or two or whatever, and also they would sell the software at half price. That sale ended when things seemed rather more hopeful than they do today. They just reinstated it, saying "Sadly, it’s clear that the pandemic continues to have a serious impact and so we’ve decided to bring back these offers once again."

Regardless of their motivation, we can for the moment buy one of these programs at roughly the same price as renting their Adobe equivalent for a month. That is not much of an investment. I don’t see that I am going to need a page-makeup program in the future but if I do I can’t imagine that I will want to rent InDesign. So I am likely to drop the $25 on Affinity Publisher. And, while I already have my copy, $25 doesn’t seem like a bad price for an emergency Photoshop backup.

https://affinity.serif.com

Dan



Bruce Jamieson
 

Dan, I love recommending Affinity’s software for people who aren’t ready for Adobe’s pricing. I haven’t given Photo a fair shake yet, but one thing I really liked about the software was the use of scopes, similar to what video colorists are able to use. I’m a huge fan of scopes because of their great ability to visualize and quantify color and saturation, far beyond what I get from viewing a histogram. Once I became acquainted with them in video, I saw scopes as something the Photoshop toolset was missing. So cheers to Affinity Photo for implementing scopes! 

Bruce Jamieson


On Jan 19, 2021, at 2:36 PM, Dan Margulis via groups.io <dmargulis@...> wrote:

The folks at Serif market, under the Affinity name, competitors to Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign (their corresponding names, respectively, are Photo, Designer, and Publisher). I have no experience with the latter two, but in February I sprang for $50 and bought a copy of Affinity Photo. It isimpressive, with several features that Photoshop lacks, like an LAB channel mixer. Since I’ve been using Photoshop for a bit longer, I’m not all that comfortable with Affinity Photo and am not qualified to do a serious comparison of the two programs. My impression, however, is that the two are quite close. If it weren’t for the PPW Panel, I’d be happy to make the switch, while reserving the right to switch back if it turned out to be less than expected.

I bring this up to point out that they’re running quite a sale now. Fairly early in the pandemic, they offered a special that they claimed was their way of supporting our profession in its hour of need. They would offer free trials for 90 days instead of the normal week or two or whatever, and also they would sell the software at half price. That sale ended when things seemed rather more hopeful than they do today. They just reinstated it, saying "Sadly, it’s clear that the pandemic continues to have a serious impact and so we’ve decided to bring back these offers once again."

Regardless of their motivation, we can for the moment buy one of these programs at roughly the same price as renting their Adobe equivalent for a month. That is not much of an investment. I don’t see that I am going to need a page-makeup program in the future but if I do I can’t imagine that I will want to rent InDesign. So I am likely to drop the $25 on Affinity Publisher. And, while I already have my copy, $25 doesn’t seem like a bad price for an emergency Photoshop backup.

https://affinity.serif.com

Dan