pattern removal redux


Martin Paul
 

I've finally been able to post the photo in an album called patttern removal in the photos section. Finally figured out I Had to resize it for uploading. The job is to remove the pattern
in the white sheet, top sheet and matching pillow, so they are just plain white. Paths included.
The file is in RGB now, but will be converted back to its original CMYK.
Thanks for your time.
Martin Paul


George Machen
 

On Feb 23, 2013, at 9:28 AM, paulpho1 wrote:

... The job is to remove the pattern in
the white sheet, top sheet and matching
pillow, so they are just plain white....
Martin, the pattern is periodic-repeating, so the first thing that popped in my head is that this is tailor-made for pattern removal with FFT (Fast Fourier Transform). The best free plug-in I've seen is here: http://bit.ly/VDHXOW but it is for Mac only; there are many others for Windows if you Google around for "FFT." There are no docs in the download so you ~must~ read this: http://bit.ly/13d8Q0x and here is a crash-course on how to use it to remove patterns, halftone dots, etc.: http://bit.ly/13yPX42 (which I see also has a link at the bottom of the page for a Windows FFT plug-in). I took a crack at it, but couldn't remove all of the bedsheet patterns, however I gave up too quickly, so you might play with it.

I also tried converting to Lab and putting a selection of the sheets in a layer above and trying to apply inverted Lightness or b channels with different blend modes & opacities, seeking to "cancel out" the pattern, but didn't get very far with my first stabs. Maybe if you spent more time on it than my hurried attempts.

But you very well may end up just excruciatingly cloning the flowers out one at a time.

George Machen


john c.
 

As far as I can tell, the FFT plug-in mentioned here doesn't work with Photoshop CS-5 or 6 on the Mac.

-----Original Message-----
From: George Machen

Martin, the pattern is periodic-repeating, so the first thing that
popped in my head is that this is tailor-made for pattern removal with
FFT (Fast Fourier Transform). The best free plug-in I've seen is here: http://bit.ly/VDHXOW
but it is for Mac only; there are many others for Windows if you
Google around for "FFT." There are no docs in the download so you
~must~ read this: http://bit.ly/13d8Q0x and here is a crash-course on
how to use it to remove patterns, halftone dots, etc.: http://bit.ly/13yPX42
(which I see also has a link at the bottom of the page for a Windows
FFT plug-in). I took a crack at it, but couldn't remove all of the
bedsheet patterns, however I gave up too quickly, so you might play
with it.


George Machen
 

On Feb 24, 2013, at 9:29 AM, John Castronovo wrote:

As far as I can tell, the FFT plug-in
mentioned here doesn't work with
Photoshop CS-5 or 6 on the Mac.
Yeah, it says it's only for Mac OS 10.5.8 & 10.6.8; CS3 or PS Elements 8, but at the bottom of the webpage it says, "Windows and Adobe CS5 versions coming soon!"... who knows?

There's Reindeer Graphics, Inc.'s FoveaPro and Image Processing Toolkit which include FFT & inverse FFT, but they're very expensive and it looks like this company is nebulous because some of the product pages are missing.
http://bit.ly/X5TwxC

The only other free FFT for Mac of which I'm aware is a plug-in for ImageJ.
http://1.usa.gov/ZBPqSc

But if you can get you hands on a Reindeer Graphics one, it's the easiest to use -- works directly & seamlessly with color images (no machinations of luminosity blends of the inverse FFT back into the original, etc.), and it has an accompanying "Top Hat" filter that makes it real easy to erase the "stars" in the FFT.

- George Machen


Steven Barton
 

I posted a quick attempt that could be more carefully worked up, using the original size. File name is Pattern-SB.

Working from a copy I converted to CMYK and made a grayscale from the yellow channel. After preparing an outline with the pen tool, I used the Photoshop "blur surface" filter to wipe out the big detail and dust and scratches (selectively brushed in) to remove the fine details. I dropped that back into the RGB and colored it the hue of the original, tweaking as seemed fit.

Steven Barton


dbernaerdt
 

On 2013-02-24, at 8:07 AM, George Machen <gmachen@...> wrote:

On Feb 24, 2013, at 9:29 AM, John Castronovo wrote:

As far as I can tell, the FFT plug-in
mentioned here doesn't work with
Photoshop CS-5 or 6 on the Mac.
Yeah, it says it's only for Mac OS 10.5.8 & 10.6.8; CS3 or PS Elements
8, but at the bottom of the webpage it says, "Windows and Adobe CS5
versions coming soon!"... who knows?

There's Reindeer Graphics, Inc.'s FoveaPro and Image Processing
Toolkit which include FFT & inverse FFT, but they're very expensive
and it looks like this company is nebulous because some of the product
pages are missing.
http://bit.ly/X5TwxC

The only other free FFT for Mac of which I'm aware is a plug-in for
ImageJ.
http://1.usa.gov/ZBPqSc

But if you can get you hands on a Reindeer Graphics one, it's the
easiest to use -- works directly & seamlessly with color images (no
machinations of luminosity blends of the inverse FFT back into the
original, etc.), and it has an accompanying "Top Hat" filter that
makes it real easy to erase the "stars" in the FFT.

- George Machen

I used ImageJ on two images that I had to restore lately that had a strong pebbled print surface. They were greyscale, but it was relatively easy to work with. It strikes me that this filter is amazing when you need it, however it's a rare situation when I require it in my work. I'll make due with the interface given how often it use it.

Darren Bernaerdt


munkiboy
 

I thought FFT was for a flat repeating pattern, would it actually work on the OPs image which is a pattern distorted by a 3D surface. As in it was a regular pattern at the sheet printing factory and now it's wrapped round the pillow etc.

Just interested, I'd be more inclined to investigate FFT if it could deal with the OPs image.

All the best,

-andy blundell

--- In colortheory@..., Darren Bernaerdt <dbernaerdt@...> wrote:

On 2013-02-24, at 8:07 AM, George Machen <gmachen@...> wrote:

On Feb 24, 2013, at 9:29 AM, John Castronovo wrote:

As far as I can tell, the FFT plug-in
mentioned here doesn't work with
Photoshop CS-5 or 6 on the Mac.
Yeah, it says it's only for Mac OS 10.5.8 & 10.6.8; CS3 or PS Elements
8, but at the bottom of the webpage it says, "Windows and Adobe CS5
versions coming soon!"... who knows?

There's Reindeer Graphics, Inc.'s FoveaPro and Image Processing
Toolkit which include FFT & inverse FFT, but they're very expensive
and it looks like this company is nebulous because some of the product
pages are missing.
http://bit.ly/X5TwxC

The only other free FFT for Mac of which I'm aware is a plug-in for
ImageJ.
http://1.usa.gov/ZBPqSc

But if you can get you hands on a Reindeer Graphics one, it's the
easiest to use -- works directly & seamlessly with color images (no
machinations of luminosity blends of the inverse FFT back into the
original, etc.), and it has an accompanying "Top Hat" filter that
makes it real easy to erase the "stars" in the FFT.

- George Machen

I used ImageJ on two images that I had to restore lately that had a strong pebbled print surface. They were greyscale, but it was relatively easy to work with. It strikes me that this filter is amazing when you need it, however it's a rare situation when I require it in my work. I'll make due with the interface given how often it use it.

Darren Bernaerdt





munkiboy
 

Hi Steven,

This is an elegant and neat solution. Could I ask how to colour the greyscale image back to the original in RGB?

When I try with layer blend mode the blue shapes come back as a pale cyan over my white sheet area.

All the best,

-andy blundell

--- In colortheory@..., Steven Barton <stevenbarton@...> wrote:

I posted a quick attempt that could be more carefully worked up, using the original size. File name is Pattern-SB.

Working from a copy I converted to CMYK and made a grayscale from the yellow channel. After preparing an outline with the pen tool, I used the Photoshop "blur surface" filter to wipe out the big detail and dust and scratches (selectively brushed in) to remove the fine details. I dropped that back into the RGB and colored it the hue of the original, tweaking as seemed fit.

Steven Barton


Martin Paul
 

The generosity of this group with their time never ceases to amaze me and especially Steven Barton's for his work on this image.
The results are great and I've been able to duplicate it on the original high res.
Martin Paul


Rex
 

Just had a look at your bed sheet retouch. Wow! Amazing!

I would have thought that a re-shoot was the only way, but obviously not.

Rex

--- In colortheory@..., Steven Barton <stevenbarton@...> wrote:

I posted a quick attempt that could be more carefully worked up, using the original size. File name is Pattern-SB.

Working from a copy I converted to CMYK and made a grayscale from the yellow channel. After preparing an outline with the pen tool, I used the Photoshop "blur surface" filter to wipe out the big detail and dust and scratches (selectively brushed in) to remove the fine details. I dropped that back into the RGB and colored it the hue of the original, tweaking as seemed fit.

Steven Barton


Steven Barton
 

The way I frequently like to color an image, is to use the levels tool and double-click the mid-tone eye dropper. When the color pallet comes up, enter the color you want. Then click on the area of the image that you want to color.

This method seems to look more natural compared to a color fill set to color blend mode.

Steven Barton

On Feb 24, 2013, at 4:22 PM, munkiboy wrote:

Hi Steven,

This is an elegant and neat solution. Could I ask how to colour the greyscale image back to the original in RGB?

When I try with layer blend mode the blue shapes come back as a pale cyan over my white sheet area.

All the best,

-andy blundell

--- In colortheory@..., Steven Barton wrote:

I posted a quick attempt that could be more carefully worked up, using the original size. File name is Pattern-SB.

Working from a copy I converted to CMYK and made a grayscale from the yellow channel. After preparing an outline with the pen tool, I used the Photoshop "blur surface" filter to wipe out the big detail and dust and scratches (selectively brushed in) to remove the fine details. I dropped that back into the RGB and colored it the hue of the original, tweaking as seemed fit.

Steven Barton


Martin Paul
 

Following Steven's instructions (I think), I Pasted a copy of the yellow channel containing just the bed sheet, top sheet and pillow ( which had the least amount of pattern visible, naturally since the pattern was bluish) into a new layer in the document. I then applied the surface blur filter fiddling with the settings to get the best compromise of obscuring the pattern but retaining shape and shadow. Next, I used the dust and scratches filter to eliminate any remaining pattern, selectively brushing using the history brush.
Finally, I created two new curves layers, for tone control, one for the top sheet and pillow, and another one for the bit of bed sheet. Worked great!
Thanks again Steve.
Martin Paul