An Era Ends


Dan Margulis
 

Greetings from Maui. Today, as they say, is the first day of the rest of my life.

As you may know, the last few months have been nonstop travel for me. It was especially strenuous in the last few weeks, when I was teaching the final round of advanced courses, which involved stops in Washington, San Diego, and, last week, Toronto, where the final advanced course piggybacked what is likely the final basic ACT.

I'm commenting on the specifics of the advanced groups in a separate post. For now, I can just say that neither of the things that I feared might happen did. I did not get overly emotional when any of the classes ended but I was very touched that so many old friends wanted to get together for one more round. On the other hand, I did not just go through the motions of teaching knowing that it was the last time. The classes were interesting, I learned a good deal, as I hope the attendees did, and there were many instructive images that nobody had seen before.

Anyhow, the class ended last Saturday evening. From there, I went to a farewell dinner with my Canadian sponsor. On Sunday morning I had to get up at the crack of dawn to leave. That was the day of the big Christmas parade in Toronto, when traffic throughout the city is nightmarish.

Canada celebrates Thanksgiving around six weeks earlier than the U.S. does, so for the last dozen years I've always taught there the week before U.S. Thanksgiving, as nobody's holiday plans are affected. So I've seen many of these Christmas parades. I can tell you the reason that they hold Christmas parades in November is that late November is plenty wintry in Toronto. It is usually below freezing, and snowy. December parades would court an epidemic of frostbite.

Not, however, in this warmest year in our planet's history. I didn't even wear a jacket most days. Similarly, I sweltered in late-October Washington. San Diego was even more striking. Being directly on the ocean, San Diego is not noted for extreme heat. But on 1 November, as I opened the advanced course there, the thermometer hit 100 Fahrenheit (38 Celsius). Temperatures that high are very rare even in the middle of summer. To have it happen in the month of November is unprecedented since records started being kept more than a century ago.

The vineyards in the Finger Lakes region have been big beneficiaries of global warming. For the past decade or so, IMHO, this area has produced the best Rieslings in the world. The lakes prevent temperature extremes, as does the relatively northern location. This favors delicate wines, as more intense ones require summer heat.

In 2009, however, the region got a summer more reminiscent of California, and 2010 was hotter still. This resulted in some extraordinary 2009 wines, with the 2010 supposedly even better. I spent Sunday and Monday tasting and buying, arriving home with 11 cases early Tuesday morning.

This didn't leave a whole lot of time to catch up with several months worth of work that could only be done in my office, before leaving for this Hawaiian trip that was impossible to schedule for a later time. So I got little sleep last week. I caught up a little in the 12 hours I spent on airplanes yesterday. Nevertheless, after arriving at the hotel at around midnight, there was little difficulty falling asleep.

So I woke up this morning to the sound of the ocean and an astonishing realization: that after several months of being very busy and several years of being busy most of the time, I was now free. I have no engagements in North America for at least the next six months. I read some Anthony Trollope and Albert Camus, and I have a dozen more books to peruse on this trip. Spent two hours in the ocean. It's a happy feeling.

With so much going on Cathy and I were in no position to prepare a Thanksgiving dinner. We went instead to a friend's house. These last three Thanksgivings, I would have to say that a lot of people did not have much to be thankful about, particularly this year. Our dinner hosts this year were an exception. A new house, big promotions and raises for both of them, and U.S. citizenship for the husband. That's quite a lot of good news for one year.

When I look back on my teaching career, however, it is hard to avoid thinking that I have even more to be thankful for than they do. It's been very stimulating, I've loved the work, I've met wonderful people, and wherever in the world I travel, I know I'll find a local friend. Of course, much of the thanks goes to members of this list.

Anyhow, what's done is done, and what happens next, happens next.

Dan Margulis


Laurentiu Todie
 

On Nov 28, 2010, at 11:13 PM, dmargulisnj wrote:

Albert Camus
After Camus should come Boris Vian, maybe Jean-Paul Sartre and (for an
awakening) Louis-Ferdinand Céline.

Enjoy the next six months and many more!
The only problem I can see is that your 11 cases of wine will need to
be crossed with rabbits for persistence.

Laurentiu Todie
lt@retouching.com
http://retouching.com


Fred D Yocum <fdy@...>
 

Dan

One of the most striking things for me, is that you have continued to
innovate and extend what you have taught even as you have begun to wind
down from a career in a field that has undergone a revolution.

I hope you will, when you have a mind to, in addition to resting on your
laurels, enjoying time with Cathy and plowing through the works of French
authors, still find time to push back the boundaries of colour
reproduction. Feel free to continue to astound us on this news group and in
any new books you care to write.

Such, alas, is life in color correction. Just when you think you're
getting the hang of it, the career is over.

Frederick D Yocum, Graphic Designer


Sterling Ledet
 

For some reason, I expect Dan's retirement will not be permanent. Sort of like that girl in Inception, for those of you who saw that movie. The urge to create is just too strong. The economy won't stay stagnant for ever. Eventually, we'll elect a Republican.

{moderator insert} In view of Sterling's incontestible contributions to my career, and my close friendship with him, I approve the above, including its last sentence, but warn that I will not approve anything that responds to the aforesaid last sentence. On behalf of those holding opposing views, I point out that even if the previous administration had not cemented its place as the most disastrous in American history in other ways, its economic mismanagement alone, which turned a vibrant economy into a global depression, would suffice. And with that remark, I thank Sterling for his comments, and turn the list's attention back to color and not politics, while I turn mine to moving my assets out of dollars. --DM {/moderator insert}


Sterling Ledet, Founder and Difference Maker
Ledet Apple and Adobe Training -  "We teach the cool stuff!"

www.ledet.com


Douglas K. Jardine
 

Hello Dan,

We've never met in person, but I have met you through your books,
articles in the NAPP magazine, and for a number of years met you in
these threads as I lurked on the sidelines.

This post is to say thank you to you for all that I have learned from
you; it is also to wish you well with whatever happens next.

Bon chance,

Doug




On 28/11/2010 8:13 PM, dmargulisnj wrote:

Greetings from Maui. Today, as they say, is the first day of the rest
of my life.

As you may know, the last few months have been nonstop travel for me.
It was especially strenuous in the last few weeks, when I was teaching
the final round of advanced courses, which involved stops in
Washington, San Diego, and, last week, Toronto, where the final
advanced course piggybacked what is likely the final basic ACT.

I'm commenting on the specifics of the advanced groups in a separate
post. For now, I can just say that neither of the things that I feared
might happen did. I did not get overly emotional when any of the
classes ended but I was very touched that so many old friends wanted
to get together for one more round. On the other hand, I did not just
go through the motions of teaching knowing that it was the last time.
The classes were interesting, I learned a good deal, as I hope the
attendees did, and there were many instructive images that nobody had
seen before.

Anyhow, the class ended last Saturday evening. From there, I went to a
farewell dinner with my Canadian sponsor. On Sunday morning I had to
get up at the crack of dawn to leave. That was the day of the big
Christmas parade in Toronto, when traffic throughout the city is
nightmarish.

Canada celebrates Thanksgiving around six weeks earlier than the U.S.
does, so for the last dozen years I've always taught there the week
before U.S. Thanksgiving, as nobody's holiday plans are affected. So
I've seen many of these Christmas parades. I can tell you the reason
that they hold Christmas parades in November is that late November is
plenty wintry in Toronto. It is usually below freezing, and snowy.
December parades would court an epidemic of frostbite.

Not, however, in this warmest year in our planet's history. I didn't
even wear a jacket most days. Similarly, I sweltered in late-October
Washington. San Diego was even more striking. Being directly on the
ocean, San Diego is not noted for extreme heat. But on 1 November, as
I opened the advanced course there, the thermometer hit 100 Fahrenheit
(38 Celsius). Temperatures that high are very rare even in the middle
of summer. To have it happen in the month of November is unprecedented
since records started being kept more than a century ago.

The vineyards in the Finger Lakes region have been big beneficiaries
of global warming. For the past decade or so, IMHO, this area has
produced the best Rieslings in the world. The lakes prevent
temperature extremes, as does the relatively northern location. This
favors delicate wines, as more intense ones require summer heat.

In 2009, however, the region got a summer more reminiscent of
California, and 2010 was hotter still. This resulted in some
extraordinary 2009 wines, with the 2010 supposedly even better. I
spent Sunday and Monday tasting and buying, arriving home with 11
cases early Tuesday morning.

This didn't leave a whole lot of time to catch up with several months
worth of work that could only be done in my office, before leaving for
this Hawaiian trip that was impossible to schedule for a later time.
So I got little sleep last week. I caught up a little in the 12 hours
I spent on airplanes yesterday. Nevertheless, after arriving at the
hotel at around midnight, there was little difficulty falling asleep.

So I woke up this morning to the sound of the ocean and an astonishing
realization: that after several months of being very busy and several
years of being busy most of the time, I was now free. I have no
engagements in North America for at least the next six months. I read
some Anthony Trollope and Albert Camus, and I have a dozen more books
to peruse on this trip. Spent two hours in the ocean. It's a happy
feeling.

With so much going on Cathy and I were in no position to prepare a
Thanksgiving dinner. We went instead to a friend's house. These last
three Thanksgivings, I would have to say that a lot of people did not
have much to be thankful about, particularly this year. Our dinner
hosts this year were an exception. A new house, big promotions and
raises for both of them, and U.S. citizenship for the husband. That's
quite a lot of good news for one year.

When I look back on my teaching career, however, it is hard to avoid
thinking that I have even more to be thankful for than they do. It's
been very stimulating, I've loved the work, I've met wonderful people,
and wherever in the world I travel, I know I'll find a local friend.
Of course, much of the thanks goes to members of this list.

Anyhow, what's done is done, and what happens next, happens next.

Dan Margulis


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Kevin Stecyk
 

Dan wrote on Sunday, 28 November 2010:

:::
So I woke up this morning to the sound of the ocean and an astonishing
realization: that after several months of being very busy and several years of
being busy most of the time, I was now free. I have no engagements in North
America for at least the next six months. I read some Anthony Trollope and
Albert Camus, and I have a dozen more books to peruse on this trip. Spent two
hours in the ocean. It's a happy feeling.
:::

I am glad you found time to write to us, letting us know you're enjoying
yourself in Maui. You certainly sound relaxed.

I hope and trust the next six months will be very good to you as you decide your
future plans. Of course, like everyone else on this list, I hope your future
does include some color theory in some fashion.

I just wanted to write a quick note to say that I am happy for you and Cathy and
that I wish you both the best.

Sincerely,
Kevin H. Stecyk


Randy Hall <randy_hall@...>
 

As someone who took Dan's basic course down in San Diego some years ago, I want to congratulate Dan on his retirement and wish him the best. He opened my eyes through his books, this list, and the class that forever changed how I approach cleaning up a photograph.

Though I don't do a ton of photo retouching or color correction these days, I still use the color theory approaches in video post-processing and of course the family snapshots. No image is too cheap that it doesn't benefit from a basic curve adjustment.

You've touched a lot of people's lives, Dan. And the industry, despite its current battered state, is better for your help.

Cheers,

--R

On Nov 28, 2010, at 8:13 PM, "dmargulisnj" <DMargulis@aol.com> wrote:

Greetings from Maui. Today, as they say, is the first day of the rest of my life.

As you may know, the last few months have been nonstop travel for me. It was especially strenuous in the last few weeks, when I was teaching the final round of advanced courses, which involved stops in Washington, San Diego, and, last week, Toronto, where the final advanced course piggybacked what is likely the final basic ACT.

I'm commenting on the specifics of the advanced groups in a separate post. For now, I can just say that neither of the things that I feared might happen did. I did not get overly emotional when any of the classes ended but I was very touched that so many old friends wanted to get together for one more round. On the other hand, I did not just go through the motions of teaching knowing that it was the last time. The classes were interesting, I learned a good deal, as I hope the attendees did, and there were many instructive images that nobody had seen before.

Anyhow, the class ended last Saturday evening. From there, I went to a farewell dinner with my Canadian sponsor. On Sunday morning I had to get up at the crack of dawn to leave. That was the day of the big Christmas parade in Toronto, when traffic throughout the city is nightmarish.

Canada celebrates Thanksgiving around six weeks earlier than the U.S. does, so for the last dozen years I've always taught there the week before U.S. Thanksgiving, as nobody's holiday plans are affected. So I've seen many of these Christmas parades. I can tell you the reason that they hold Christmas parades in November is that late November is plenty wintry in Toronto. It is usually below freezing, and snowy. December parades would court an epidemic of frostbite.

Not, however, in this warmest year in our planet's history. I didn't even wear a jacket most days. Similarly, I sweltered in late-October Washington. San Diego was even more striking. Being directly on the ocean, San Diego is not noted for extreme heat. But on 1 November, as I opened the advanced course there, the thermometer hit 100 Fahrenheit (38 Celsius). Temperatures that high are very rare even in the middle of summer. To have it happen in the month of November is unprecedented since records started being kept more than a century ago.

The vineyards in the Finger Lakes region have been big beneficiaries of global warming. For the past decade or so, IMHO, this area has produced the best Rieslings in the world. The lakes prevent temperature extremes, as does the relatively northern location. This favors delicate wines, as more intense ones require summer heat.

In 2009, however, the region got a summer more reminiscent of California, and 2010 was hotter still. This resulted in some extraordinary 2009 wines, with the 2010 supposedly even better. I spent Sunday and Monday tasting and buying, arriving home with 11 cases early Tuesday morning.

This didn't leave a whole lot of time to catch up with several months worth of work that could only be done in my office, before leaving for this Hawaiian trip that was impossible to schedule for a later time. So I got little sleep last week. I caught up a little in the 12 hours I spent on airplanes yesterday. Nevertheless, after arriving at the hotel at around midnight, there was little difficulty falling asleep.

So I woke up this morning to the sound of the ocean and an astonishing realization: that after several months of being very busy and several years of being busy most of the time, I was now free. I have no engagements in North America for at least the next six months. I read some Anthony Trollope and Albert Camus, and I have a dozen more books to peruse on this trip. Spent two hours in the ocean. It's a happy feeling.

With so much going on Cathy and I were in no position to prepare a Thanksgiving dinner. We went instead to a friend's house. These last three Thanksgivings, I would have to say that a lot of people did not have much to be thankful about, particularly this year. Our dinner hosts this year were an exception. A new house, big promotions and raises for both of them, and U.S. citizenship for the husband. That's quite a lot of good news for one year.

When I look back on my teaching career, however, it is hard to avoid thinking that I have even more to be thankful for than they do. It's been very stimulating, I've loved the work, I've met wonderful people, and wherever in the world I travel, I know I'll find a local friend. Of course, much of the thanks goes to members of this list.

Anyhow, what's done is done, and what happens next, happens next.

Dan Margulis


John Denniston <john_denniston@...>
 

Announcement from Adobe

The Adobe team of engineers responsible for the development of Photoshop
announced today they will relaunch Photoshop 4 on December 1st, 2010 as
their premiere graphics application.

Admitting that colour profiles have been a colossal failure and waste of
money Adobe said they only put the stuff in Photoshop to bug Dan
Margulis and now that he’s retired they won’t have him to kick around
anymore so the entire point of Photoshop 5, 6, CS, CS2, etc is lost.

When asked about all the money and time spent over the years by
professional and amateur photographers trying to learn about colour
profiles there was a chorus of laughter from the engineers present at
the announcement which only stopped when the public relations officer,
Kelly Green, dismissed the question with, “Get a life, read some poetry!”.

An unidentified Adobe spokesperson later confirmed reports that the
introduction of profiles in Photoshop 5 was just a prank to prove
software engineers have a sense of humour. “How were they to know so
many people would take it seriously?”

-30-

Thanks for saving my life more than once Dan.

John Denniston
____________________
www.sportpix.ca
www.johndenniston.ca
www.dirtbikephoto.com


David Lawrence
 

--- In colortheory@yahoogroups.com, "dmargulisnj" <DMargulis@...> wrote:

Greetings from Maui. Today, as they say, is the first day of the rest of my life.

Anyhow, what's done is done, and what happens next, happens next.

Dan Margulis
Dan,

I too have not enjoyed the privledge of meeting you in person, but I still feel a kind of kinship to your way of being and thinking. I have contemplated your retirement lately and in reference to my own. I watched 60 Minutes last night (taped) and when the piece on Justice Stevens aired, I couldn't help but think of you and ponder why you were retiring so early. :o)

I agree with Sterling. I don't think you'll be able to stay out of the kitchen very long, at least that's my hope. I certainly wouldn't want to deny you a well deserved retirement, I just hope you get bored.

Let's face it, without you and Cathy, none of us would have ever met "The Man from Mars."


Thank you!

David Lawrence
www.PixelPurfect.com

From CBSNEWS.com.

Justice John Paul Stevens has shaped more American history than any Supreme Court justice alive. And for most of his 35 years on the court, he followed the usual tradition: declining to talk about his cases in interviews.

As he prepared to retire, "60 Minutes" and correspondent Scott Pelley hoped he would overrule that custom and talk with us about the decisions that have changed our times.

At the end of his last term, Justice Stevens ruled on our request and, in a series of interviews, opened a rare window into the nation's highest court.

We met Stevens at the Supreme Court this past summer as he prepared to retire at the age of 90.

Here's a link to the 60 Minutes segment.
http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7096996n&tag=contentMain;contentBody


Alessandro Bernardi
 

--- In colortheory@yahoogroups.com, "dmargulisnj" <DMargulis@...> wrote:

Greetings from Maui. Today, as they say, is the first day of the rest of my life.
... snip...

Anyhow, what's done is done, and what happens next, happens next.
This is *just* a little bit emotional for me and I think also for everyone had attended your classes, your sessions at PSW, read your books or participated to this list.

It's like watching a beautiful movie that you hope will never end. But finally it does, like everything in our lives.
The difference is that this movie is owned only by you, together with its special player. So, it's up to you.

My best wishes to you and Cathy for you next lives. I know how hard your life has been until now and this is the right end.

But I also know that Caravaggio or Leonardo were not able to do anything different from what they were able to do.
My uncle was a dentist and always said to me "the dentist's destiny is to die with his tools in his hands".

I don't know in which way you're planning to write your own end, but it's hard to believe that will be without a Mac and an image open for new unconventional color correction strategies.
In my opinion won't be so strange that, while you're going around in Maui, you could be inspired from something you'll see there.
Or this could happen in your next trip to Italy, or wherever you'll go.

Maybe some day we'll see Man from Saturn or the Vesuvio Workflow: in the meanwhile we'll be missing you in any way.

From Dante's Divina Commedia, Inferno, Canto 27, Ulysse talks to the crew before going through the Pillars of Hercules:

Fatti non foste a viver come bruti,
ma per seguir virtute e conoscenza.

That's why I came to USA more than three years ago, having the honor and pleasure to make your acquaintance.
Actually, one of the best decisions ever taken in my life.

With all my love and respect, again, I wish all the best to you and Cathy,
Alessandro Bernardi


denyerec
 

Hi there,
Having come far too late to the game to take advantage of the in-person workshops and having experienced Dan's work only through books, internet postings and the odd video I would also still like to thank you for your invaluable teaching and insight. To say that your presence in the field will be missed I believe would be an understatement of inordinate scale.

Thankyou for opening my eyes and feeding both my curiosity and enthusiasm. May your retirement be both long and relaxing, for I suspect it's been well earned!

Kindest regards,
Den Denyer

--- In colortheory@yahoogroups.com, "dmargulisnj" <DMargulis@...> wrote:

Greetings from Maui. Today, as they say, is the first day of the rest of my life.


David Deranian
 

Hello Dan--

Like Doug who wrote you below, I too, am one of many "active" lurkers on this list. I pretty much read it top to bottom everyday. I too am an "older dude" who started with Photoshop going all the way back to the time is was called "Photo-Mac" and was installed via floppy disk. It wasn't until my mentor Sanjay Sakuja from Digital Prepress International in San Francisco took me under his wing and suggested I read your first book that I was permanently converted into the non-calibrationists camp and have never regretted it.

I have to say, it wasn't without some negative result. I taught a Photoshop class for photographers at a Boston University extension school, and used your methods. Suffice it to say, the class was a huge success, and my students were very pleased with the result of their much improved photos, and this is years before Man-From-Mars was around. After a while, the school standardized their curriculum, but I still insisted on using your far superior techniques, to the appreciation of my students. None the less, I was eventually "not renewed" for being a rogue instructor that wouldn't follow the inferior standardized teaching protocol. So much for institutions of higher learning.

In spite of all that, I have to thank you immensely for providing me with the tools and skills that have helped me maintain an edge over my competitors. To my clients and professional colleagues I'm the go-to-guy and a bit of a know-it-all. But I have no delusions, I can't come close to knowing what you and the other heavy weight guys and gals on this list contribute on a regular basis. I actually do feel a little guilty for not being more of an active participant on this list, but I want you and everyone that does write in to know that while many of us are passive readers, we very much appreciate the vast amount of knowledge you generous folks are willing to share.

My best wishes to you for a peaceful and well deserved "semi-retirement". And while we all wish you peace, love and relaxation, we also all hope eventually you'll get itchy enough to write another book, or do some more instructional videos for us poor folk.

Thanks for everything Dan!

Warm Regards,
--David Deranian
Cambridge, Massachusetts
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On Nov 30, 2010, at 10:01 AM, colortheory@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Hello Dan,

We've never met in person, but I have met you through your books,
articles in the NAPP magazine, and for a number of years met you in
these threads as I lurked on the sidelines.

This post is to say thank you to you for all that I have learned from
you; it is also to wish you well with whatever happens next.

Bon chance,

Doug


Lee Varis
 

As one who has taken perhaps more classes with Dan than most, I just want to express my heartfelt thanks for all that he has taught over the years -- Dan, you are truly a "one of a kind" person!

I've been lurking here for quite some time and have been too busy trying to reinvent myself (for the 3rd time in my life) to contribute much but I just want you to know that I will continue to monitor the list and hopefully start contributing soon as long as the list lives! I sincerely hope that you will chime in every once in a while as the mood strikes you – we all need further nuggets of gold to carry on the work you started

To everyone who has taken a class from Dan – lets plan a gathering of alumni... an informal get together at some vacation destination where we can share what we've all been up to. Something to think about anyway – what do you think?


regards,

Lee Varis
varis@varis.com
http://www.varis.com
323-209-5376


colorman042000
 

Hello Dan,

It's been a while since I spoke to you ... Enjoy the "rest of your life" you certainly deserve it, you have taught so many of us, me included and the time I spent in Colortheory remains as some of the best memories in my life, also as a beta reader of two of your books I remember those days as "the good old days".

It's a coincidence that a few weeks ago I ordered Albert Camus' "L'Homme Révolté" and was told by our library that it had been lost and I will have to wait till they buy a new copy. I hope you enjoy yours.

Time flies so fast as we get older so don't wait before catching and enjoying some of it.


André Dumas

--- In colortheory@yahoogroups.com, "dmargulisnj" <DMargulis@...> wrote:

Greetings from Maui. Today, as they say, is the first day of the rest of my life.


So I woke up this morning to the sound of the ocean and an astonishing realization: that after several months of being very busy and several years of being busy most of the time, I was now free. I have no engagements in North America for at least the next six months. I read some Anthony Trollope and Albert Camus, and I have a dozen more books to peruse on this trip. Spent two hours in the ocean. It's a happy feeling.


When I look back on my teaching career, however, it is hard to avoid thinking that I have even more to be thankful for than they do. It's been very stimulating, I've loved the work, I've met wonderful people, and wherever in the world I travel, I know I'll find a local friend. Of course, much of the thanks goes to members of this list.

Anyhow, what's done is done, and what happens next, happens next.

Dan Margulis


Davide Barranca
 

Dear Dan,

eras have to come to an end; we all know that you've been planning the beginning of this new one for quite a long time, so I'm confident you've a busy schedule of things to do and places that Cathy and you wish to see. Take your time and enjoy this new beginning: I won't hope (even though I would very like to) that you'll keep working in color correction in your spare time. We all, maybe egoistically, would desire this - instead, be proud of this huge, marvellous, generous, kind, group of people that have been collecting in the years around your classes and books, be proud... and enjoy all the rest. Color correction is a great passion that we share, but we know from all of your writings that it's just one among several other passions you have: I wish you could pursue them all.

A couple of personal notes: I still remember, in the early 2000, when I got the first Professional Photoshop book. I was working as a projectionist in a movie theater, and sitting near the machine (for those who haven't had the rather dubious pleasure to stand beside a movie projector, it makes the noise of a machine-gun, and usually it's in a very small room) I've spent night after night completely captivated by this new world that was opening in front of my eyes. It's not an overstatement to say that you changed my job and then my entire life. Thank you.

Second, I would persist in suggesting you to write a book of memories while you rest in some sandy beach or traveling by plane: decades in the business and your sense of humor, that would be a rather explosive mix. Up to you if it'll be published posthumous ;-))

A big hug to Cathy and you, waiting to met you again in Italy - if this will be your very last advanced class of your career, we'll do our best both to make you don't regret retiring ;-) nor for regretting to choose Italy as the last country (you know there's a guy named Alessandro in charge of the organization, I'm sure we all won't forget the event)

Davide Barranca


Marco Olivotto - LoL Productions snc <marco@...>
 

I am somewhat late in writing this, for a number of reasons; but I'd
like to add my voice for a short consideration.
PP5E was waiting for me in London, in 2007, lurking from a bookshelf
at Foyles. It caught my attention, I gave it a quick look and bought
it. I would never have dreamed, at the time, that it might lead me
this far; also, I have to add, that a book would have become the key
to getting in touch with so many interesting and brilliant people in
the name of a common interest. Some of these folks have become my best
friends, and this fact alone would be enough to feel happy.

Anyway, in retrospect, there are three miniatures, so to say, that I'd
like to reveal.

The first dates back to 2008, when I first met Dan in Italy. We had
been in touch by e-mail and at some point, to my surprise, he informed
me that he was about to come to Italy and, moreover, stay in an area
not far from where I live. We managed to arrange a dinner - it was me,
Dan, Cathy and Valentina, a girl who used to work with me at the time
and who would attend the Corciano class the next year. I remember that
Dan, at some point, on a paper towel, outlined the main principles of
PPW for us. The Kelby Training videos weren't available yet, at that
point. So, at the table, I got a free lesson on our first meeting. At
least, I knew what to expect when the official stuff appeared. I don't
think I need to comment about this - alone, it says a lot about both
the man and the teacher.

The second miniature appeared one year later. When Alessandro
organised the first Italian class ever in Corciano, the evening before
was devoted to getting to know the people we would share our
experience with. I clearly remember asking one of the participants
(Daniele Di Stanio) whether he had come to learn techniques or a more
general philosophy. He replied "techniques, of course" - while I said
I was more interested in the overall vision I had already found in the
books. I can't speak for him, but I suspect that Daniele later
understood exactly what I meant when I stated this. I could get away
with curves, at the time, and of course I had a huge margin for
improvement, but that was not the main point for me. I wanted
substance, depth and food for thought. And I got enough of all this to
go ahead for ages.

The third miniature took shape a month ago. I was interviewed for a
local magazine, and one of the questions was "which book would you
bring on a desert island?". It's a horrible question, of course I
literally live on books. My final choice mentioned two titles: Robert
Pirsig's "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance", and Dan
Margulis' PP5E. I realized this might be the weirdest possible
marriage ever conceived, so I added the following sentence: "By the
way, I consider the latter one of the best philosophy books written in
the last century. I really do mean this." And, believe me, I do.

Dan - you're through, but not completely. You still have a class in
Italy. It will be a serious one - we're tough chaps, as you already
know. And the toughest among those you've met will certainly be there.
I am 100% sure you won't forget it, in the good sense, also because a
guy whose signature goes "ab" is in charge of The Thing: but we'll all
do our best to make this happen.

Thanks a lot for everything, from the heart.

Marco
---
Marco Olivotto

LoL Productions snc
1/A Via per Sasso
38060 - NOGAREDO (TN)
ITALY
Ph/Fax: +39-0464-490614

marco@lolproductions.it
http://www.lolproductions.it






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


photografix1999
 

Mr. Margulis, had you not shared so much information over the years, I would not have been able to be much of a retoucher. That's been my career. That's been my purpose in life. Starting "way back" in 1999, your color concepts and methods formed most of my own. We never met. But over the years I worked at companies where you trained folks I worked under, I read your books, articles and enrolled in your NAPP video courses. Your humor added an ingredient that made the impossible very possible.

Well, now the industry has changed drastically with retouching and color correction going to Asia. Since I do not plan to leave the USA nor build a time machine, I am making adjustments for a reinvention. As with all of us who are not near "retirement," we really have no choice.

Regardless, I wanted to chime in as well with a hearty salutation of gratitude. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Enjoy your new adventures.

--
Eric Curtis M. Basir
Photo Grafix
http://www.PhotoGrafix.pro
http://photografixpro.blogspot.com/
http://twitter.com/photografix
Evanston, IL (USA)
(847) 673-7043

--- In colortheory@yahoogroups.com, "dmargulisnj" <DMargulis@...> wrote:

Greetings from Maui. Today, as they say, is the first day of the rest of my life.
...
Anyhow, what's done is done, and what happens next, happens next.

Dan Margulis


pmarr@...
 

Dan, may you and Cathy have a long and happy retirement. Until the 3rd edition of Professional Photoshop reached my hands by accident, being magenta-green color challenged made my life as an outdoor writer/photographer a misery whenever I had to prepare my own files. Further editions and the Lab book added to my comfort zone. I believe I joined the list in 2002 and have found it a constant source of enlightenment and at times entertainment. Hopefully that will continue.

Paul Marriner


Paco
 

Hi to all and specially to Dan,

I want to... or in reality... I don't want to... join all the others that have written saying their goodbyes to Dan. But hey... Arturo la cucaracha (that's Archie the cockroach's New Yorican cousin) wants me to stop procrastinating and write something.

I don't want to write and say goodbye 'cause that is what I would say to someone I don't expect to ever see again. And I can't see me saying that to Dan. Ever! So he is retiring! Yeah... right.

No... there is a little kid at the controls inside Dan's serious and ferocious exterior. And kids will always be kids. They keep asking "why?" and then "why not?" Man... kids never run out of energy and curiosity!

So it is with great joy that I don't come here to say my goodbyes, but to congratulate Dan on having decided to take it easier (finally!).

Einstein never stopped calculating, Edison never stopped inventing, Beethoven never stopped humming and Dan will never stop figuring out how.

The Paleolithic era immediately gave way to the Mesolithic era which gave way to the Neolithic era. So, epic as it sounds, don't let that "An Era Ends" tittle make you think of a slow disolve as Dan sails into the sunset from Rincon (more on this follows).

Now, if anything good came out of all of these goodbyes, it is Lee's idea for a reunion! So I'm proposing to have it take place at the wonderful and picturesque destination of Rincon, Puerto Rico. A place where the rich and vibrant colors of the tropical sea titillates even the most advanced of all color correction specialists (about to retire). It is half way (sort of) between our westernmost and easternmost friends, is part of the USA and is very accommodating to visitors from all over the world. What do you say?

So there… let's say hello to a new era!

To all of you and specially to Dan... All the best!

Paco
www.pacomarquez.com

--- In colortheory@yahoogroups.com, Lee Varis <varis@...> wrote:

To everyone who has taken a class from Dan – lets plan a gathering of alumni... an informal get together at some vacation destination where we can share what we've all been up to. Something to think about anyway – what do you think?


Richard Chang <richardchang@...>
 

With regard to Dan's recent exchange of avocation for principal occupation, it is practical to say thanks to him for believing in us-- as people who are capable of making the correct choices for our images. Dan never gave us rituals, he gave us guidelines and options.

It should be remembered that Dan started this back in the old days of image processing, back when we used a monitor space as our color working space. We didn't have 16 bits or any of the color management options now considered common.

Back in the old days, we were regularly encouraged by the color management cognoscenti to buy the newest "bag of bones," guaranteed to make our color perfect. These were products that were dropped annually like hot rocks the next year in the marketing of the latest greatest new products, that in today's hindsight could not possibly have worked. Today, color management is still not yet invented; there are changes to come that we will question because Dan encouraged us to question what we hear and to evaluate objectively. Dan taught us to use craftsmanship to modify our images into a rendering that considered the constraints of the target and the time required to effect a productive workflow. We invested in ourselves, not in some new fangled products.

The use of Dan's recommendations have always worked because they were based on our human decisions, not on product or software design. Dan trusted us to do the right thing with the education he graced us with. Anyone who teaches us as well as Dan has; to be better; is to be lauded.

This list is testament to the effect Dan has had on a lot of people who consider their images important. For that we have eternal thanks for his sharing his insights, his constant search for improvement of his routines, and, for sharing his sharp wit! Dan's posts have been not only informative but entertaining, especially when discoursing with the aforementioned cognoscenti.

Richard Chang
MegaVision, Inc.