Re: By the numbers ?


Bob Smith <rmsmith@...>
 

Dan Margulis wrote:

Similarly, Bob's suggestion of using a wider-gamut RGB definition works
some of the time.
Its not a matter of being wider. Its a matter of matching what Nikon was
targeting their output to. Why, I don't know... but Nikon has said that
Nikon D1 in camera processing is done with output to NTSC rgb in mind. It
has to be going to some definition of RGB and that's what Nikon chose.
Kodak Pro cameras output RGB (via std acquire module processing) that very
closely approximates ColorMatch RGB. Pull Kodak files straight into
ColorMatch RGB and they'll need only minor color tweaking. Pull them into
something like Adobe RGB without compensation and you've got a whole
different task ahead of you. Even when the camera is set to deliver a
finished file, there's no profile embedded in the camera file to describe
its RGB space. Why write redundant data to every image when disk space and
write speed are at a premium?

Processing in a camera like the D1 is quite different from the auto
processing so prevalent in the lower end models. You can put a camera like
the D1 or the pro Kodaks into a condition where they auto-processes color,
but that's unusual and certainly not generally recommended.

What's needed on the lower end cameras is an option to deliver raw files for
those that want to milk these things for all they can do. Access to the raw
files allows a tremendous amount of control over what the image looks like.
I stayed with Kodak cameras and passed on the D1 mainly because it offered
such poor support for handling raw data files. Kodaks (the pro level
models) are built around the concept of having the camera deliver raw data
and then processing later. Its been fun to watch D1 shooters discover what
they can do with raw data. I've seen more than a few who were ready to
chunk the camera over color woes. Then they got hold of good piece of
software for handling raw data and thought they had a new camera. Raw data
files are now available on the new Olympus E-10... a sub $2k model. I bet
we see it on more even lower end models in the not too distant future.

Bob Smith

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