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LED lighting - (was Death to sodium lighting)

EDS
 

LED lighting is like any other technology: has different qualities, limited uses and can be implemented in different ways.

Lighting design suffers from some similar limitations

 

Since a couple of years ago, high quality LEDs have improved color rendition and other parameters to near equal other light sources, or better (like efficiency). LED manufacturers have different lines, aimed to different markets. As with discharge, fluorescent or even tungsten (remember dichroic lamps, with their color halo?), color quality depends on the factory and the line chosen.  So the problem is not LED, but what LED you use! And what driver: frequency can be very high, if that is what is chosen.

 

I work both as a DP and LD (lighting designer), and have tried LEDs with very good results (and horrible ones, of course!!!)

 

Regarding art lighting, I agree that many galleries and museums seem not to even think about it, but other do a very good job. Of course we all – and specially visual artists - need to demand better lighting, and netter research about how the artists produce their works, to be lighted accordingly.

 

Just another point of view…

 

Eduardo Safigueroa

DP – LD

Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

De: cml-lighting@groups.io [mailto:cml-lighting@groups.io] En nombre de Art Adams
Enviado el: lunes, 27 de noviembre de 2017 16:27
Para: cml-lighting@groups.io
Asunto: Re: [cml-lighting] Death to sodium lighting

 

Just finished shooting at an art exhibition lit completely with LEDs, and I am not looking forward to the correction work it will require.

 

That's absolutely horrifying. Years ago it occurred to me that whenever I viewed a painting in the gallery I saw it under very warm tungsten light, while the painting itself was painted in daylight. That changes the experience in not insignificant ways, and it's not at all how the artist intended the painting to be viewed. It's certainly not what they saw when they painted it.

 

Sadly, most artists don't seem to grasp this. And now, if galleries are starting to use LEDs... going to such an art show would be pointless. It's like watching a movie with the house lights on. Why bother?

 

That, combined with the tendency for most galleries to light paintings at the exact glare angle that prevents me from enjoying said paintings, makes me want to buy art books instead of going to galleries. (Although that doesn't always work either: I saw an amazing art show in San Francisco and, when I went to buy the exhibition book, discovered that it was printed poorly on matte paper. That's not a good idea when you're selling this item to people who have just seen the frickin' paintings.)

 

I've noticed a lot of stores putting in narrow band LEDs, which makes everything look like it's a "thinner" version of what it really is. It's as if reality is a film negative that was under processed and printed up too far. I visited a grocery store chain that I normally avoid, as their stores tend to be ugly and understaffed, and they'd lit the entire produce area with narrow band, greenish blue, hard beam LED lights, while the rest of the store was lit by their usual extra warm yellow-green fluorescents. I felt like I was visiting a plant morgue.

 

--

Art Adams

Director of Photography

San Francisco Bay Area

 


Libre de virus. www.avast.com

Art Adams
 

Just another point of view…

And a good one. Thanks, Eduardo.

I guess the problem is lack of education or knowledge on the part of a lot of people who light spaces for various uses. There are too many people who think that “all cameras are the same” or “all LED lights are the same,” with predictable results.

There are some excellent LED lamps out right now. More good ones than bad ones, I’d say. In the industrial/retail/gallery world, though, it’s a crap shoot, as I suspect cost and lack of knowledge win out over quality and testing.

--
Art Adams
Director of Photography
San Francisco Bay Area