ISO Pet Bunny Rabbit


lrhilyard
 


Our son would like a pet bunny for his 11th birthday this month. We would love recommendations on places to find a good pet bunny. 
Thank you!

Lauren and family
--
Lauren R. Hilyard


James Linde
 


Please check with the Humane Rescue Alliance. Your son con could even pick it out. They seem to always get them when folks might have gotten one for Easter. 
https://www.humanerescuealliance.org/animal-search/other  

Jim

- original message -
Our son would like a pet bunny for his 11th birthday this month. We would love recommendations on places to find a good pet bunny. 
Thank you!


Mike S
 

 
Most people have complete misconceptions when it comes to raising rabbits, which can end in disaster for the bunny and amount to a bad experience for your child. To get up to speed on what is needed (beginning with the fact that bunnies do best in male-female pairs, require regular exercise, teeth trimming, decoys to chew on, etc., .I suggest that you contact the House Rabbit Society, which lists bunny-loving foster parents in most areas (including DC) who likely will be more than helpful in making sure your furry new pets gets a happy and healthy start in your home. The site also features bunnies that are up for adoption, and information about bunny dating, etc. Immersing yourself in this organization before you adapt, I learned, can be both fun and rewarding, arming you with essentially what you'll need to  make adoption of a rabbit by you and your son is a thoroughly rewarding experience. 

The Humane Society likely will have rabbits, but may come up short about the essentials of caring  for them. The House Rabbit Society, from my experience, will happily fill in the blanks. Some children will lose interest in these lovable furry creatures once they realize the work that goes into caring for them. Check with HRS before you adopt so that you can be sure that this is a responsibility that both you and your son are willing to wholeheartedly embrace.
 
Good luck.
 
Mike


Eleanor
 


Another interesting pet, but one that will be quite a lively presence in your family might be a ferret. They are very, clever and very smart. They will even learn words, especially their name, and if they think you merit it, may even come when called!

~Eleanor O.

- from previous message -
Most people have complete misconceptions when it comes to raising rabbits, which can end in disaster for the bunny and amount to a bad experience for your child. To get up to speed on what is needed (beginning with the fact that bunnies do best in male-female pairs, require regular exercise, teeth trimming, decoys to chew on, etc., I suggest that you contact the House Rabbit Society, which lists bunny-loving foster parents in most areas (including DC) who likely will be more than helpful in making sure your furry new pets gets a happy and healthy start in your home. The site also features bunnies that are up for adoption, and information about bunny dating, etc. Immersing yourself in this organization before you adapt, I learned, can be both fun and rewarding, arming you with essentially what you'll need to  make adoption of a rabbit by you and your son is a thoroughly rewarding experience. [snip]


Beth Mullen,
 

Bunnies can be wonderful pets. They are highly social and do well with another rabbit friend. As mentioned, the House Rabbit Society is a wonderful resource. Bunnies can be clicker trained and learn cues just like other animals.

One of my bunnies lived for ten years, so it is a commitment. Here’s a photo of Lion, my very sweet and petite Lionhead rabbit who lived a decade.

Many shelters have bunnies available, too. Lion was a rescue.

Best,
Beth
 
Beth Mullen,
Owner/Founder, CBCC, KPA-CTP
202-412-0708
www.doglatindogtraining.com
Cleveland Park Listserv Sponsor 
 



Karen Davis
 


Our daughter had a bunny who lived to be 14. A dwarf, he was smart, a good pet -- attached himself to her -- who enjoyed being walked on a leash outdoors, gamboling around the house, etc. He also loved our house sitter, who came mostly to stay with him whenever we were out of town. (If he'd had a bunny companion, wouldn't the companion have gotten most of the attention? I don't honestly know, but that's what happens with birds.) We bought him at a school auction -- meaning we got a gift certificate at the auction that was redeemable at a rabbit "farm" in Potomac. No idea whether that (sort of) place still exists.
 
Karen Davis
Connecticut Ave. - previous message -
Bunnies can be wonderful pets. They are highly social and do well with another rabbit friend. As mentioned, the House Rabbit Society is a wonderful resource. Bunnies can be clicker trained and learn cues just like other animals.
One of my bunnies lived for ten years, so it is a commitment. Here’s a photo of Lion, my very sweet and petite Lionhead rabbit who lived a decade. [photo available at Message   ]
Many shelters have bunnies available, too. Lion was a rescue.