Happy to take some of your bamboo!


Hernan Abeledo
 

Inspired by the recent exchange on bamboo barriers, I decided to plant some in large containers. I would like to create a barrier that is about 6' wide by 1' deep and six feet or so high.
 
Let me know if you have any that I could dig up and take home.
 
Thank you!
 
Hernan
Tenleytown 
habeledo@...
 


Nancy Bekavac
 


DON'T DO IT. Running bamboo is a nuisance, and your will ruin relations with any sentient neighbors.
If you do want an attractive barrier, only use nandina, a clumping, more delicate variety that can be controlled.

-Nancy 

- from previous message -
Inspired by the recent exchange on bamboo barriers, I decided to plant some in large containers. I would like to create a barrier that is about 6' wide by 1' deep and six feet or so high. [snip]


westwindnotnorth
 


If you want to do this, plant in metal containers with seams that are sealed. I have seen the roots crack through plastic containers so make sure there aren’t any holes or textured surfaces. Good luck.

Mary 
Luzerne Ave   

- from previous message - 
Inspired by the recent exchange on bamboo barriers, I decided to plant some in large containers. I would like to create a barrier that is about 6' wide by 1' deep and six feet or so high. [snip]


Hernan Abeledo
 

Hi Nancy,
 
Thank you for the warning, but I will not be planting in my garden. It will be in a planter on an asphalt driveway. Do you think that would be OK? 
Any advice on bamboo in planters is appreciated.
 
Two neighbors already offered bamboo, so I don't need more for the time being.
 
Thank you,
 
Hernan

- previous message -
DON'T DO IT.  Running bamboo is a nuisance, and your will ruin relations with any sentient neighbors.
If you do want an attractive barrier, only use nandina, a clumping, more delicate variety that can be controlled.


Kathleen Klein
 

Yes. I agree. Nandina is beautiful. It’s a type of bamboo with bright red berries. Fills in nicely. Check if it will grow in pots.
It borders our Japanese garden and we love it.

Kathleen
-----------
Editor's note: You can see photos of nandina and learn more about it here:
https://www.gardenia.net/plant/nandina-domestica-heavenly-bamboo

- from previous message -
[snip] If you do want an attractive barrier, only use nandina, a clumping, more delicate variety that can be controlled.


aquint7 .
 


I seem to recall seeing that it was illegal to plant bamboo in DC. Has anyone else heard that?

Aline Quint
--------
Editor's note: I attempted to look up the answer to this question myself by googling it, but my quick search just turned up a couple of Washington Post articles from 2012 and 2013 that discussed the idea of making it illegal to plant bamboo -- and nothing later than that to indicate that the proposal went anywhere. If anyone can find more a more definitive answer, please feel free to post. Or if anyone is currently pushing for such legislation, let us know the status of the effort.


SKBennet BENNET
 

Please see the editor’s note: nandina is lovely ( we have many bushes in our garden) but the berries are toxic to many bird species and wild life, as well as dogs and cats.

Susie

- previous message -
Yes. I agree. Nandina is beautiful. It’s a type of bamboo with bright red berries. Fills in nicely. Check if it will grow in pots.
It borders our Japanese garden and we love it.
-----------
Editor's note: You can see photos of nandina and learn more about it here:
https://www.gardenia.net/plant/nandina-domestica-heavenly-bamboo


Turnham
 


Nandina (Heavenly Bamboo) does do well in pots too and is so easy to control in the yard: if it gets too tall or wide you can just snap pieces off with your hands. It does make runners but these small plants can easily be pulled up and transplanted, given to others or put into pots. This plant looks great in all seasons.!

Barbara


Eleanor
 


Don’t Do it!  May I suggest cedar, Virginia Pine or some other tall, narrow evergreen. They also act as a windbreak and can protect your house from weather. Once planted they will be maintenance-free.

~Eleanor O.

- previous message -
Thank you for the warning, but I will not be planting in my garden. It will be in a planter on an asphalt driveway. Do you think that would be OK? 
Any advice on bamboo in planters is appreciated.


Helen Qubain
 

Has anyone had experience with asking a neighbor to take out their bamboo? If so, what happened?
 
One neighbor with whom we share a back fence has bamboo along their side of our shared fence and we have to pull bamboo shoots out every year. I've been a coward about approaching them on this, but I really wish they'd take it out.  

-Helen


Brett
 


One approach is to install a steel barrier. We did so and it completed prevented it from creeping into our yard.  

Brett

- previous message -
Has anyone had experience with asking a neighbor to take out their bamboo? If so, what happened?
One neighbor with whom we share a back fence has bamboo along their side of our shared fence and we have to pull bamboo shoots out every year. I've been a coward about approaching them on this, but I really wish they'd take it out.  


westwindnotnorth
 

The bamboo rhizomes can go down as deep as 30-36”. Taking out an established clump is darn near impossible. I know people have used a backhoe to take out a large stand. 
 
Mary Schmitt 
Luzerne Ave 

- previous message -
Has anyone had experience with asking a neighbor to take out their bamboo? If so, what happened?
One neighbor with whom we share a back fence has bamboo along their side of our shared fence and we have to pull bamboo shoots out every year. I've been a coward about approaching them on this, but I really wish they'd take it out.  


aquint7 .
 

Nandina is also on lists of invasive plants for some states, the berries being the issue. The thinking is that birds can carry and deposit them elsewhere (much like English Ivy), and if they’re planted alongside parklike areas the dropped berries can easily seed on their own. I’ve personally never seen any except in gardens, but that’s what I’ve heard.  I don’t know if some varieties are more of a threat than others.  
 
Aline

- previous message -
Nandina (Heavenly Bamboo) does do well in pots too and is so easy to control in the yard: if it gets too tall or wide you can just snap pieces off with your hands. It does make runners but these small plants can easily be pulled up and transplanted, given to others or put into pots. This plant looks great in all seasons!


Linnea Warren
 

Nandina is NOT a type of bamboo; it's an Asian shrub in the Barberry family, not a grass, that has been nicknamed "Heavenly Bamboo" because some people think it resembles bamboo.

If you look at the website Peggy gave a link to - https://www.gardenia.net/plant/nandina-domestica-heavenly-bamboo - you'll see that its leaves and berries are toxic to cats, dogs, and other wildlife (some birds in particular) and that it has become invasive in the southeastern US.

So it may not be a great alternative, especially as DC's climate gets warmer.

Linnea Warren


Lucie Patton
 


We had someone install concrete a few feet down and around the roots and that took care of most of it but we are still dealing with problem from some roots that weren’t all taken out before! It used to be like a bamboo forest on our pea gravel and rock garden every time it rains! They were sooo invasive!

Lucie

- previous message -
One approach is to install a steel barrier. We did so and it completed prevented it from creeping into our yard. 


Lin Schmale-Tate
 

I agree! Nandina, while a reasonably attractive shrub, is TOXIC to cats, dogs, wildlife and SOME BIRDS, and has become invasive. Please ask your garden center to recommend a more suitable planting!!

Lin Tate

- previous message -
Nandina is NOT a type of bamboo; it's an Asian shrub in the Barberry family, not a grass, that has been nicknamed "Heavenly Bamboo" because some people think it resembles bamboo.
If you look at the website Peggy gave a link to - https://www.gardenia.net/plant/nandina-domestica-heavenly-bamboo - you'll see that its leaves and berries are toxic to cats, dogs, and other wildlife (some birds in particular) and that it has become invasive in the southeastern US.
So it may not be a great alternative, especially as DC's climate gets warmer.


Terri Shaw
 


When we lived in Shepherd Park our neighbor's bamboo was a source of some tension, to say the least. It was never resolved. We moved to an apartment building with no bamboo.

Terri Shaw

- previous message -
We had someone install concrete a few feet down and around the roots and that took care of most of it but we are still dealing with problem from some roots that weren’t all taken out before! It used to be like a bamboo forest on our pea gravel and rock garden every time it rains! They were sooo invasive!


Cathy Winer
 


Nandina  will definitely self-seed in a garden — I have several examples at my house, so it seems quite possible that seeds dropped by birds could sprout in parks/woods.

Cathy

- previous message -
Nandina is also on lists of invasive plants for some states, the berries being the issue. The thinking is that birds can carry and deposit them elsewhere (much like English Ivy), and if they’re planted alongside parklike areas the dropped berries can easily seed on their own. I’ve personally never seen any except in gardens, but that’s what I’ve heard.  I don’t know if some varieties are more of a threat than others. 


Eric Rubin
 


We've been coping with our back-fence neighbors' bamboo for 25 years. We put in a steel barrier under the wall and fence we erected on our back property line in 1997. It only took the bamboo a few years to figure out how to tunnel horizontally under the barrier and come up in our yard and garden. It can grow up to a foot a day in growing season. Some species can grow three feet a day 
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo#:~:text=Bamboos%20include%20some%20of%20the,centimeters%7D%20every%2040%20minutes).
 
Our former back-fence neighbor always blamed her ex-husband for planting the bamboo soon after they moved in in 1968. I believe it was one of the list of grievances in the divorce.
 
Seriously, do not ever plant this stuff in this city or any city. We are resigned to it after 25 years but it is an annual battle to beat it back from our neighbors' property.

Eric Rubin
Newark St. NW


erinhgleeson@...
 


Please don’t plant bamboo OR nandina…plant native! (Nandina is POISONOUS to native birds!) There are many wonderful resources in the DMV for finding the species that will work best for your, including Arlington’s Native Plant Nursery, Earth Sangha, and others. Also, there are some excellent native landscapers around,  such as Aldertree Garden, who can help design a yard that’s both beautiful and beneficial. Please, please, please, inform yourself about how destructive both bamboo and nandina are and find some beautiful, local alternatives. We have many! 

Erin Gleeson, MSc. Climate Science, Master Naturalist
Washington, D.C. 
Cell: +1 202 807 7843