E-bikes abandoned in neighborhoods. Who to call?


shapiro@...
 


I'm all for alternative transportation, but the ugly bright orange Jump/Lime bikes have been proliferating in my Woodley Park neighborhood and I believe the company is depositing them randomly. One just appeared in front of my house and I don't want to have to look at it for the next months. I've also noticed one of these apparently thrown over the Klingle bridge, and one at the bottom of Rock Creek below Calvert Street.

I tried to find a website or phone number to get the company to come take these away but I seemed to be required to register or become a member. Has anyone had success with this?

Thanks,

Judy in Woodley south of Zoo


shapiro@...
 


Update: it turned out one can write to support@...
You have to provide the tag number and the street address.

After a bit of back and forth they did finally come collect it. Overall they were pretty responsive.

I hope that when we see these ebikes abandoned in ravines and river beds we can get into the habit of reaching out or DC will start to look like urban China with piles of bike trash.

Judy

- original message -
I'm all for alternative transportation, but the ugly bright orange Jump/Lime bikes have been proliferating in my Woodley Park neighborhood and I believe the company is depositing them randomly. One just appeared in front of my house and I don't want to have to look at it for the next months. I've also noticed one of these apparently thrown over the Klingle bridge, and one at the bottom of Rock Creek below Calvert Street.
I tried to find a website or phone number to get the company to come take these away but I seemed to be required to register or become a member. Has anyone had success with this?
Thanks


hal.ninek@verizon.net
 


It is sad when people dump bike share bikes into Rock Creek. But it doesn't mean the program is not working to take more cars off the road, to everyone's benefit.

I'm not sure about your reference to urban China and bike trash. I've been to China and haven't really noticed it to be that trashy and certainly have not seen bikes strewn about the street. Now, there was a photo circulating about a year ago where bikes were being disposed on in a landfill. Far different than bike trash strewn streets, which does not happen and is a bit offensive to Chinese people.  

As for someone parking a bike on the street, that is the price we pay for living in the city. Yep, every now and then a bike will be parked on your street. And then it will leave because someone will ride it away, as the program is intended.

Steve Seelig

- previous message -
Update: it turned out one can write to support@... 
You have to provide the tag number and the street address.
After a bit of back and forth they did finally come collect it. Overall they were pretty responsive.
I hope that when we see these ebikes abandoned in ravines and river beds we can get into the habit of reaching out or DC will start to look like urban China with piles of bike trash.


Kenneth Nellis
 

The curious might check out Google Images for China Bicycle Graveyard.

―Ken Nellis

- from previous message -
[snip]
I'm not sure about your reference to urban China and bike trash. I've been to China and haven't really noticed it to be that trashy and certainly have not seen bikes strewn about the street. Now, there was a photo circulating about a year ago where bikes were being disposed on in a landfill. Far different than bike trash strewn streets, which does not happen and is a bit offensive to Chinese people. 
[snip]

- from previous message -
[snip]
I hope that when we see these ebikes abandoned in ravines and river beds we can get into the habit of reaching out or DC will start to look like urban China with piles of bike trash.
[snip] 


Stephanie Gerard
 


Would guess that e-bikes parked on streets are not abandoned; they have signals indicating where they are for the next rider. Maybe ones discarded in ravines. etc are victims of vandalism or theft. Doubt if legit riders would do so because would be found out electronically. Likely e-companies would want to collect them because those bikes are expensive! Same with scooters. 

Stephanie

- original message -
I'm all for alternative transportation, but the ugly bright orange Jump/Lime bikes have been proliferating in my Woodley Park neighborhood and I believe the company is depositing them randomly. One just appeared in front of my house and I don't want to have to look at it for the next months. I've also noticed one of these apparently thrown over the Klingle bridge, and one at the bottom of Rock Creek below Calvert Street.
I tried to find a website or phone number to get the company to come take these away but I seemed to be required to register or become a member. Has anyone had success with this?
Thanks


Molly Spitzer Frost
 

These bikes are not randomly abandoned. Our daughter’s family was here last weekend and they were able to locate bikes and scooters in various locations. The companies have certain areas, mostly near metro stations, where bikes are kept, but they are also left on sidewalks. Our grandchildren were able to take the bikes down to see the cherry blossoms and then bring them back and leave them in a responsible location, which was actually on a sidewalk. A person looking for transportation can find out the various locations on their phone and then access the bikes they want via cell phones and credit cards. This is actually a rather creative and helpful routine for getting around the city.

Molly on 35th

- original message -
I'm all for alternative transportation, but the ugly bright orange Jump/Lime bikes have been proliferating in my Woodley Park neighborhood and I believe the company is depositing them randomly. [snip]


James Linde
 


I just wish people would not leave them obstructing a sidewalk. Think about the visually impaired. I have reminded people ending their rides and a usual response is they never thought about that. 

Jim

- previous message -
These bikes are not randomly abandoned. Our daughter’s family was here last weekend and they were able to locate bikes and scooters in various locations. The companies have certain areas, mostly near metro stations, where bikes are kept, but they are also left on sidewalks. Our grandchildren were able to take the bikes down to see the cherry blossoms and then bring them back and leave them in a responsible location, which was actually on a sidewalk. A person looking for transportation can find out the various locations on their phone and then access the bikes they want via cell phones and credit cards. This is actually a rather creative and helpful routine for getting around the city.


Sarah Karlin
 


It seems like a lot of people are holding bikes to a standard few hold motor vehicle too. Would the original poster characterize the cars (even ones in a color or shape not to his or her taste) parked legally on a street in the same way as these bikes? 
 
Why are these much larger, dangerous, more polluting vehicles allowed all over the city with little questioning. It's laughable to me how much rage was generated over a bike. 

Sarah Karlin

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The original message is available at Message  


promoa027@...
 


Agree with Sarah and as an Asian American really confused about the exaggerated comparison to China and making the references to Wuhan. With all the anti-Asian racism going on, I'm not sure why a problem specific to Woodley Park/DC required a comparison to a bigger issue in China and then a comment about Wuhan. I'm not sure how this is positive contribution to the community or empathetic to the current issues going on. Maybe the comment about China was to make a point about the gravity of the situation of e-bikes in DC....but the subsequent posts serving up images and clearly DC is nowhere near that...other than to embarrass people and make certain groups feel ashamed? 
 
Alex

- previous message -
It seems like a lot of people are holding bikes to a standard few hold motor vehicle too. Would the original poster characterize the cars (even ones in a color or shape not to his or her taste) parked legally on a street in the same way as these bikes? 
Why are these much larger, dangerous, more polluting vehicles allowed all over the city with little questioning. It's laughable to me how much rage was generated over a bike. 


kencluskey@...
 

I agree with Alex. Considering recent posts about Cleveland Park’s past and the current environment, please be sensitive to how your arguments are made so they don’t appear racist. If the desire to still make an argument like the confusing comparison or argument that was made, perhaps it is time to re-examine and rethink what is on your mind and in your heart. 
 
As a husband of an Asian American and resident of Woodley Park, it is my hope that we learn from our past and make a conscious choice to not repeat it and be better. 
 
Thank you,
 
Ken
--
Ken Cluskey

- previous message - 
Agree with Sarah and as an Asian American really confused about the exaggerated comparison to China and making the references to Wuhan. With all the anti-Asian racism going on, I'm not sure why a problem specific to Woodley Park/DC required a comparison to a bigger issue in China and then a comment about Wuhan. I'm not sure how this is positive contribution to the community or empathetic to the current issues going on. Maybe the comment about China was to make a point about the gravity of the situation of e-bikes in DC....but the subsequent posts serving up images and clearly DC is nowhere near that...other than to embarrass people and make certain groups feel ashamed?  


Courtney Stoner
 


Agreed. A half-totaled car sits on the street and no fuss is made. But a stray e-bike? Throw a fit. Also, usually if it ends up in a residential neighborhood, is because someone from that neighborhood rode it there. What good does the company benefit from dropping off the bikes in a neighborhood where everyone has a car?

As another Asian American, I'm lucky to not have experienced the level of thinly veiled racism in-person as is going on in this thread right now. The comparisons to China and Wuhan are super unnecessary, not helpful, and do not contribute to the conversation AT ALL. Perpetuating these stereotypes are extremely harmful, unless you have conveniently forgotten about the slaying and attacks on Asian Americans across the country. I bet your lawn/window has a sign that says "We're Glad You're Our Neighbor," too.

I understand you may be upset about the lack of sidewalk space, but someone posted the solution: contact the company and they are great to work with. No need to respond with thinly veiled racism that makes members of the community feel unsafe.

And the fact that only Asian American members (and adjacent, thank you Ken) of the community are on here speaking out against anti-Asian racism on the forum? Shame.

Courtney
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The previous message is available at Message  


Karen Davis
 

The real question might be ascertaining whether they’ve really been abandoned or “strategically” placed or a combination of the latter and, perhaps, then forgotten? I say this only after having seen one of the rental bike company’s vans down in Rock Creek early this morning, sort of randomly scattering a few bikes and scooters along the trail there. I suppose it’s marketing, but ...?

Karen Davis
Connecticut Ave


James Linde
 


My only concern is one just leaving the bike in the middle of the sidewalk where someone who is blind or has poor vision can trip over it. The scooter companies and bicycle companies use geo-fencing to limit where rides can be ended. They did this with Car2go before they left North America a year ago. It limits where one can and can't ride. It’s why you don’t see abandoned bikes around some of the memorials. I kind of like the racks the big red bikes seem to require to end a ride. 

Jim


Stephanie Gerard
 


It occurs to me that if people are finding so many e-bikes "trashed," it's not being done by the company but by vandals/thieves. Those bikes are expensive machinery that the companies would not trash. Also, the last customer to ride a "trashed" bike would be easily found out via credit card.

I am a bike rider in the neighborhoods and have never seen a trashed e-bike, in ravines or alleys, though sometimes they are parked/left in alleys. And sometimes they fall over and might be mistaken for "trashed" or abandoned bikes.

Could it be that the first reporters of this situation don't know how the e-bikes model works? Not like Capital Bikeshare, which has specific docking stations. E-bikes are handy and free-range. If you see an e-bike in front of your dwelling, it does not need to be "collected." It's there until another rider comes to use it. If it falls over, it's not hard to stand it up and move it to the side. (They are perhaps too heavy for the elderly.) 
 
Steph
Woodley Rd