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today's launch #LaunchReport

Jonathan Sivier
 

Despite a bit more wind than we like we had a nice day at the
Forsyth field flying rockets today. We had rockets flying all motor
sizes from A to I and one L motor flown during the day. Also
congratulations to Jeff Jable on his Level 1 certification this afternoon.

Greg Smith wins the Eagle Eye 1st Class award for spotting my rocket
that was lost in the field about a 1/2 mile away from the launch pads by
noticing the sun reflecting off one of it's fins. It was my Upscale
Star Blazer which flew on an F39 motor. It failed to fire its ejection
charge and stuck in the ground. The impact damaged the body tube such
that it folded up and thus the rocket was laying on the ground. It
didn't help that it wasn't painted. However, Mark, Steve and I scoured
that field and probably walked within a few feet of the rocket, but
didn't see it until the sun got a bit lower and then it shown like a
beacon. The upper part of the rocket was damaged, but most of it is OK
and it will fly again.

I claim an Eagle Eye 2nd Class for spotting the Initiator that was
flown on an F25 and lost in the field north of the road while I was
walking to recover my Groove Tube that I flew on a D16 QJet motor. I
was getting close to where I thought my rocket had landed and was
looking from side to side when I spotted a rocket laying in the plowed
field about 50 feet from the track that I was walking. I recovered it,
returned to my track to where my rocket landed and very shortly after
that found my rocket as well.

The 3rd rocket, actually the first one of the day, I flew today was
the Cool Whip container originally built by Rick Kramer. I flew it on
an MPC B3-3, and 18mm motor from the 1970's. It flew fine and didn't
require a long walk like the other rockets I flew.

I've created a hashtag #LaunchReport for launch reports. Replies to
this message should retain it, but if you send a fresh message with a
launch report you might want to use the hash tag.

Jonathan

Greg Smith
 

One observation from today's launch is that we continued to have a high rate of failures with Estes E12 motors. I didn't fly any today, but four of the last five I've used have blown through - including three simultaneously in the cluster rocket I tried to fly at our night launch in September. Today, of the five E12s that were flown, three failed, and at least one of those caused some pretty serious damage to the rocket it was in.

That's a high enough rate of problems that I would be VERY hesitant to use one of these motors in a valuable rocket at this point. Catos should also be reported through the NAR MESS process (http://www.motorcato.org/) and to the manufacturer. Hopefully, Estes will be able to get on top of this problem and improve the reliability of the motors in time, but for now, approach them with extreme caution.

- GDS

Timothy Cole
 

As the owner of the Initiator I want to thank you for finding it! It was truly depressing leaving without it. This was our first launch event and the first time in about 20 years that we have launched anything. We really enjoyed meeting everyone and getting a glimpse of some awesome rockets and quite a few successful launches. We are already looking forward to the next launch event and eventual level 1 certification! 

Again thank you! 

Christopher Deem
 

I made four flights. First was my Solar Probe saucer on a mid 1990's Synerjet H167. This is a higher thrust motor than is optimal for a saucer, but it flew fine. It landed in the plowed field North of the road, and there was some damage. Second, was my Not So Great Pumpkin ( a plastic Halloween candy dish) on a G25W. As always, a great flight that amuses the crowd. Third was the 146th flight of the Big Brute on a G54-5FJ this time. Another good flight. Last, but not least, was my Stellar Probe, a 21 inch diameter saucer on a motor that will never be seen again, a Plasmajet I102 single use 54mm. According to the label, it was made August 22, 1992.  It lite on the first try, and was an impressive, if somewhat low flight. The motor burned for over 5 seconds, and I'm not sure how much of that was up. The descent seemed slow, so it will fly again.

Christopher Brian Deem NAR 12308 TRA 2256 level 2

Jonathan Sivier wrote:

Despite a bit more wind than we like we had a nice day at the
Forsyth field flying rockets today. We had rockets flying all motor
sizes from A to I and one L motor flown during the day. Also
congratulations to Jeff Jable on his Level 1 certification this afternoon.

Greg Smith wins the Eagle Eye 1st Class award for spotting my rocket
that was lost in the field about a 1/2 mile away from the launch pads by
noticing the sun reflecting off one of it's fins. It was my Upscale
Star Blazer which flew on an F39 motor. It failed to fire its ejection
charge and stuck in the ground. The impact damaged the body tube such
that it folded up and thus the rocket was laying on the ground. It
didn't help that it wasn't painted. However, Mark, Steve and I scoured
that field and probably walked within a few feet of the rocket, but
didn't see it until the sun got a bit lower and then it shown like a
beacon. The upper part of the rocket was damaged, but most of it is OK
and it will fly again.

I claim an Eagle Eye 2nd Class for spotting the Initiator that was
flown on an F25 and lost in the field north of the road while I was
walking to recover my Groove Tube that I flew on a D16 QJet motor. I
was getting close to where I thought my rocket had landed and was
looking from side to side when I spotted a rocket laying in the plowed
field about 50 feet from the track that I was walking. I recovered it,
returned to my track to where my rocket landed and very shortly after
that found my rocket as well.

The 3rd rocket, actually the first one of the day, I flew today was
the Cool Whip container originally built by Rick Kramer. I flew it on
an MPC B3-3, and 18mm motor from the 1970's. It flew fine and didn't
require a long walk like the other rockets I flew.

I've created a hashtag #LaunchReport for launch reports. Replies to
this message should retain it, but if you send a fresh message with a
launch report you might want to use the hash tag.

Jonathan

William Carney
 

Temp cycling?  I've flown over 100 E12 and only had about 2 or so fail.
William

In a message dated 11/24/2019 8:57:21 PM Central Standard Time, gregs@... writes:

One observation from today's launch is that we continued to have a high rate of failures with Estes E12 motors. I didn't fly any today, but four of the last five I've used have blown through - including three simultaneously in the cluster rocket I tried to fly at our night launch in September. Today, of the five E12s that were flown, three failed, and at least one of those caused some pretty serious damage to the rocket it was in.

That's a high enough rate of problems that I would be VERY hesitant to use one of these motors in a valuable rocket at this point. Catos should also be reported through the NAR MESS process (http://www.motorcato.org/) and to the manufacturer. Hopefully, Estes will be able to get on top of this problem and improve the reliability of the motors in time, but for now, approach them with extreme caution.

- GDS