SpacEx launch report!


CHARLES GREENWOOD
 

Tonight's launch was one of those that stuns.  The trajectory was almost directly away from my house, and there was not enough moonlight to see the booster, so it was all about the base...the engines, that is.   

As the rocket rose, the flames change colors, going from orange kerosene flame to blue-white, and somewhat green.  Though I could not see the booster, the individual flames from the nine engines were clearly visible through 7-power binoculars..  Just before main engine cutoff, the plume expands into what I call an exhaust flower.  Tonight, the plumes from first and second stage combined to make the most intricate flower I have yet seen.  Multi-colored and swirling, overlapping into a giant figure eight cloud that was many times larger (in apparent size) than the moon, the ever-changing cloud was visible for longer than usual, too.  

After stage separation, the first stage appeared higher than the second as it boosted back toward a ground landing at the cape.  I had forgotten that tonight was an LZ-1 instead of ship landing, so I missed out on seeing the two burns on the way back down.  The sonic boom, however, was most satisfyingly loud and long.  That makes for 50 landings.  who'd a thunk it?

C.


Mike Little
 

I also watched from our condo in Cape Coral. Not as spectacular as your vantage point, but still amazing to see it from 100 mile away! I watched the Falcon Heavy launch earlier and it was really cool how bright it was. Easily saw staging and even the booster falling away!
Mike Little


On Sat, Mar 7, 2020 at 12:10 AM CHARLES GREENWOOD <greenwood_c@...> wrote:
Tonight's launch was one of those that stuns.  The trajectory was almost directly away from my house, and there was not enough moonlight to see the booster, so it was all about the base...the engines, that is.   

As the rocket rose, the flames change colors, going from orange kerosene flame to blue-white, and somewhat green.  Though I could not see the booster, the individual flames from the nine engines were clearly visible through 7-power binoculars..  Just before main engine cutoff, the plume expands into what I call an exhaust flower.  Tonight, the plumes from first and second stage combined to make the most intricate flower I have yet seen.  Multi-colored and swirling, overlapping into a giant figure eight cloud that was many times larger (in apparent size) than the moon, the ever-changing cloud was visible for longer than usual, too.  

After stage separation, the first stage appeared higher than the second as it boosted back toward a ground landing at the cape.  I had forgotten that tonight was an LZ-1 instead of ship landing, so I missed out on seeing the two burns on the way back down.  The sonic boom, however, was most satisfyingly loud and long.  That makes for 50 landings.  who'd a thunk it?

C.