how many Gs??? #Tech


Gary Slater
 

My friend is confident his fiberglass DX3 XL is well enough built.  But he is a bit concerned about the electronics?  Rocksim is giving him a number of almost 29!  Speed over 900mph max (~mach 1.2) Can the rocket and the electronics sustain that?  
 
He said he used lots of Rocket Poxy for construction.
It has a Perfect Flight and an RRC2 in the ebay.  
 
 


Tim Dixon
 

Should be fine. From my experience, well-built lightweight fiberglass and carbon fiber can withstand Mach 2 flight. Regarding g-forces, typically ascent will be relatively mild compared to your deployment events, especially apogee events that happen while the rocket is traveling horizontally due to wind cock or other factors. In fact, the only time I have pegged my Raven 3 accelerometer (70g version, not the 250g version) is during apogee deployment and that was a large rocket with a heavy nosecone.


On Fri, Sep 17, 2021 at 1:09 PM Gary Slater <gws77@...> wrote:
My friend is confident his fiberglass DX3 XL is well enough built.  But he is a bit concerned about the electronics?  Rocksim is giving him a number of almost 29!  Speed over 900mph max (~mach 1.2) Can the rocket and the electronics sustain that?  
 
He said he used lots of Rocket Poxy for construction.
It has a Perfect Flight and an RRC2 in the ebay.  
 
 


Gary Slater
 

Thanks, Tim!

On 09/17/2021 12:58 PM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:
 
 
Should be fine. From my experience, well-built lightweight fiberglass and carbon fiber can withstand Mach 2 flight. Regarding g-forces, typically ascent will be relatively mild compared to your deployment events, especially apogee events that happen while the rocket is traveling horizontally due to wind cock or other factors. In fact, the only time I have pegged my Raven 3 accelerometer (70g version, not the 250g version) is during apogee deployment and that was a large rocket with a heavy nosecone.

On Fri, Sep 17, 2021 at 1:09 PM Gary Slater < gws77@...> wrote:
My friend is confident his fiberglass DX3 XL is well enough built.  But he is a bit concerned about the electronics?  Rocksim is giving him a number of almost 29!  Speed over 900mph max (~mach 1.2) Can the rocket and the electronics sustain that?  
 
He said he used lots of Rocket Poxy for construction.
It has a Perfect Flight and an RRC2 in the ebay.  
 
 

 

 


Connor Latham
 

Make sure they dont underestimate the weight of the batteries and such at those accelerations. Need to ensure secure points for those are nice and strong. 

Also would recommend ensuring wires and such are taped along their routes or zip tied. Then maybe secure the ends that are in the lil flight computer terminals with something non conductive (i think hot glue might be?). 

As long as everything is mounted well, the electronics should be fine. Id take the assembled avi bay and like swing it around/give it some good jolts to see if anything comes loose, then inspect it after as well. 

Connor



On Fri, Sep 17, 2021, 12:59 Gary Slater <gws77@...> wrote:
Thanks, Tim!
On 09/17/2021 12:58 PM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:
 
 
Should be fine. From my experience, well-built lightweight fiberglass and carbon fiber can withstand Mach 2 flight. Regarding g-forces, typically ascent will be relatively mild compared to your deployment events, especially apogee events that happen while the rocket is traveling horizontally due to wind cock or other factors. In fact, the only time I have pegged my Raven 3 accelerometer (70g version, not the 250g version) is during apogee deployment and that was a large rocket with a heavy nosecone.

On Fri, Sep 17, 2021 at 1:09 PM Gary Slater < gws77@...> wrote:
My friend is confident his fiberglass DX3 XL is well enough built.  But he is a bit concerned about the electronics?  Rocksim is giving him a number of almost 29!  Speed over 900mph max (~mach 1.2) Can the rocket and the electronics sustain that?  
 
He said he used lots of Rocket Poxy for construction.
It has a Perfect Flight and an RRC2 in the ebay.  
 
 

 

 


Tim Dixon
 

Conner is 100% right. In the case of a Raven altimeter they recommend adding Goop or similar adhesive on the large hold-up cap for high G-force events. I do this "upon receipt" from Adrian. Thankfully, Jim Amos, with the RRC2 already has a physical wire strap on its hold up capacitor. The Perfectflite CF has mostly surface mount components. And, based on a complete prange landing at Three Oaks, I was left with a completely functioning PerfectFlite CF, so again, we benefit from smart guys designing electronics for us today. Little to no risk on the electronics you have selected.

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021, 12:05 AM Connor Latham <connorl2@...> wrote:
Make sure they dont underestimate the weight of the batteries and such at those accelerations. Need to ensure secure points for those are nice and strong. 

Also would recommend ensuring wires and such are taped along their routes or zip tied. Then maybe secure the ends that are in the lil flight computer terminals with something non conductive (i think hot glue might be?). 

As long as everything is mounted well, the electronics should be fine. Id take the assembled avi bay and like swing it around/give it some good jolts to see if anything comes loose, then inspect it after as well. 

Connor



On Fri, Sep 17, 2021, 12:59 Gary Slater <gws77@...> wrote:
Thanks, Tim!
On 09/17/2021 12:58 PM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:
 
 
Should be fine. From my experience, well-built lightweight fiberglass and carbon fiber can withstand Mach 2 flight. Regarding g-forces, typically ascent will be relatively mild compared to your deployment events, especially apogee events that happen while the rocket is traveling horizontally due to wind cock or other factors. In fact, the only time I have pegged my Raven 3 accelerometer (70g version, not the 250g version) is during apogee deployment and that was a large rocket with a heavy nosecone.

On Fri, Sep 17, 2021 at 1:09 PM Gary Slater < gws77@...> wrote:
My friend is confident his fiberglass DX3 XL is well enough built.  But he is a bit concerned about the electronics?  Rocksim is giving him a number of almost 29!  Speed over 900mph max (~mach 1.2) Can the rocket and the electronics sustain that?  
 
He said he used lots of Rocket Poxy for construction.
It has a Perfect Flight and an RRC2 in the ebay.  
 
 

 

 


Gary Youhas
 


On Sat, Sep 18, 2021 at 12:58 AM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:
Conner is 100% right. In the case of a Raven altimeter they recommend adding Goop or similar adhesive on the large hold-up cap for high G-force events. I do this "upon receipt" from Adrian. Thankfully, Jim Amos, with the RRC2 already has a physical wire strap on its hold up capacitor. The Perfectflite CF has mostly surface mount components. And, based on a complete prange landing at Three Oaks, I was left with a completely functioning PerfectFlite CF, so again, we benefit from smart guys designing electronics for us today. Little to no risk on the electronics you have selected.

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021, 12:05 AM Connor Latham <connorl2@...> wrote:
Make sure they dont underestimate the weight of the batteries and such at those accelerations. Need to ensure secure points for those are nice and strong. 

Also would recommend ensuring wires and such are taped along their routes or zip tied. Then maybe secure the ends that are in the lil flight computer terminals with something non conductive (i think hot glue might be?). 

As long as everything is mounted well, the electronics should be fine. Id take the assembled avi bay and like swing it around/give it some good jolts to see if anything comes loose, then inspect it after as well. 

Connor



On Fri, Sep 17, 2021, 12:59 Gary Slater <gws77@...> wrote:
Thanks, Tim!
On 09/17/2021 12:58 PM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:
 
 
Should be fine. From my experience, well-built lightweight fiberglass and carbon fiber can withstand Mach 2 flight. Regarding g-forces, typically ascent will be relatively mild compared to your deployment events, especially apogee events that happen while the rocket is traveling horizontally due to wind cock or other factors. In fact, the only time I have pegged my Raven 3 accelerometer (70g version, not the 250g version) is during apogee deployment and that was a large rocket with a heavy nosecone.

On Fri, Sep 17, 2021 at 1:09 PM Gary Slater < gws77@...> wrote:
My friend is confident his fiberglass DX3 XL is well enough built.  But he is a bit concerned about the electronics?  Rocksim is giving him a number of almost 29!  Speed over 900mph max (~mach 1.2) Can the rocket and the electronics sustain that?  
 
He said he used lots of Rocket Poxy for construction.
It has a Perfect Flight and an RRC2 in the ebay.  
 
 

 

 


Gary Youhas
 

Google Search - electronics design challenges of hypersonic flight

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021 at 11:20 PM Gary Youhas <sahuoy@...> wrote:

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021 at 12:58 AM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:
Conner is 100% right. In the case of a Raven altimeter they recommend adding Goop or similar adhesive on the large hold-up cap for high G-force events. I do this "upon receipt" from Adrian. Thankfully, Jim Amos, with the RRC2 already has a physical wire strap on its hold up capacitor. The Perfectflite CF has mostly surface mount components. And, based on a complete prange landing at Three Oaks, I was left with a completely functioning PerfectFlite CF, so again, we benefit from smart guys designing electronics for us today. Little to no risk on the electronics you have selected.

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021, 12:05 AM Connor Latham <connorl2@...> wrote:
Make sure they dont underestimate the weight of the batteries and such at those accelerations. Need to ensure secure points for those are nice and strong. 

Also would recommend ensuring wires and such are taped along their routes or zip tied. Then maybe secure the ends that are in the lil flight computer terminals with something non conductive (i think hot glue might be?). 

As long as everything is mounted well, the electronics should be fine. Id take the assembled avi bay and like swing it around/give it some good jolts to see if anything comes loose, then inspect it after as well. 

Connor



On Fri, Sep 17, 2021, 12:59 Gary Slater <gws77@...> wrote:
Thanks, Tim!
On 09/17/2021 12:58 PM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:
 
 
Should be fine. From my experience, well-built lightweight fiberglass and carbon fiber can withstand Mach 2 flight. Regarding g-forces, typically ascent will be relatively mild compared to your deployment events, especially apogee events that happen while the rocket is traveling horizontally due to wind cock or other factors. In fact, the only time I have pegged my Raven 3 accelerometer (70g version, not the 250g version) is during apogee deployment and that was a large rocket with a heavy nosecone.

On Fri, Sep 17, 2021 at 1:09 PM Gary Slater < gws77@...> wrote:
My friend is confident his fiberglass DX3 XL is well enough built.  But he is a bit concerned about the electronics?  Rocksim is giving him a number of almost 29!  Speed over 900mph max (~mach 1.2) Can the rocket and the electronics sustain that?  
 
He said he used lots of Rocket Poxy for construction.
It has a Perfect Flight and an RRC2 in the ebay.  
 
 

 

 


Gary Youhas
 


On Sun, Sep 19, 2021 at 12:05 AM Gary Youhas via groups.io <sahuoy=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Google Search - electronics design challenges of hypersonic flight

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021 at 11:20 PM Gary Youhas <sahuoy@...> wrote:

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021 at 12:58 AM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:
Conner is 100% right. In the case of a Raven altimeter they recommend adding Goop or similar adhesive on the large hold-up cap for high G-force events. I do this "upon receipt" from Adrian. Thankfully, Jim Amos, with the RRC2 already has a physical wire strap on its hold up capacitor. The Perfectflite CF has mostly surface mount components. And, based on a complete prange landing at Three Oaks, I was left with a completely functioning PerfectFlite CF, so again, we benefit from smart guys designing electronics for us today. Little to no risk on the electronics you have selected.

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021, 12:05 AM Connor Latham <connorl2@...> wrote:
Make sure they dont underestimate the weight of the batteries and such at those accelerations. Need to ensure secure points for those are nice and strong. 

Also would recommend ensuring wires and such are taped along their routes or zip tied. Then maybe secure the ends that are in the lil flight computer terminals with something non conductive (i think hot glue might be?). 

As long as everything is mounted well, the electronics should be fine. Id take the assembled avi bay and like swing it around/give it some good jolts to see if anything comes loose, then inspect it after as well. 

Connor



On Fri, Sep 17, 2021, 12:59 Gary Slater <gws77@...> wrote:
Thanks, Tim!
On 09/17/2021 12:58 PM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:
 
 
Should be fine. From my experience, well-built lightweight fiberglass and carbon fiber can withstand Mach 2 flight. Regarding g-forces, typically ascent will be relatively mild compared to your deployment events, especially apogee events that happen while the rocket is traveling horizontally due to wind cock or other factors. In fact, the only time I have pegged my Raven 3 accelerometer (70g version, not the 250g version) is during apogee deployment and that was a large rocket with a heavy nosecone.

On Fri, Sep 17, 2021 at 1:09 PM Gary Slater < gws77@...> wrote:
My friend is confident his fiberglass DX3 XL is well enough built.  But he is a bit concerned about the electronics?  Rocksim is giving him a number of almost 29!  Speed over 900mph max (~mach 1.2) Can the rocket and the electronics sustain that?  
 
He said he used lots of Rocket Poxy for construction.
It has a Perfect Flight and an RRC2 in the ebay.  
 
 

 

 


steven dramstad
 

I have flown a perfect flite cf altimeter at 100+Gs with no issues.

38 mm minimum diameter rocket with an H999 in it. 29 Gs shouldn’t be a problem

Steve

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Gary Youhas
Sent: Sunday, September 19, 2021 2:41 AM
To: cia-rocketry@groups.io
Subject: Re: [cia-rocketry] how many Gs???

 

 

On Sun, Sep 19, 2021 at 12:05 AM Gary Youhas via groups.io <sahuoy=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

Google Search - electronics design challenges of hypersonic flight

 

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021 at 11:20 PM Gary Youhas <sahuoy@...> wrote:

 

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021 at 12:58 AM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:

Conner is 100% right. In the case of a Raven altimeter they recommend adding Goop or similar adhesive on the large hold-up cap for high G-force events. I do this "upon receipt" from Adrian. Thankfully, Jim Amos, with the RRC2 already has a physical wire strap on its hold up capacitor. The Perfectflite CF has mostly surface mount components. And, based on a complete prange landing at Three Oaks, I was left with a completely functioning PerfectFlite CF, so again, we benefit from smart guys designing electronics for us today. Little to no risk on the electronics you have selected.

 

On Sat, Sep 18, 2021, 12:05 AM Connor Latham <connorl2@...> wrote:

Make sure they dont underestimate the weight of the batteries and such at those accelerations. Need to ensure secure points for those are nice and strong. 

 

Also would recommend ensuring wires and such are taped along their routes or zip tied. Then maybe secure the ends that are in the lil flight computer terminals with something non conductive (i think hot glue might be?). 

 

As long as everything is mounted well, the electronics should be fine. Id take the assembled avi bay and like swing it around/give it some good jolts to see if anything comes loose, then inspect it after as well. 

 

Connor

 

 

 

On Fri, Sep 17, 2021, 12:59 Gary Slater <gws77@...> wrote:

Thanks, Tim!

On 09/17/2021 12:58 PM Tim Dixon <dixontj936@...> wrote:

 

 

Should be fine. From my experience, well-built lightweight fiberglass and carbon fiber can withstand Mach 2 flight. Regarding g-forces, typically ascent will be relatively mild compared to your deployment events, especially apogee events that happen while the rocket is traveling horizontally due to wind cock or other factors. In fact, the only time I have pegged my Raven 3 accelerometer (70g version, not the 250g version) is during apogee deployment and that was a large rocket with a heavy nosecone.

 

On Fri, Sep 17, 2021 at 1:09 PM Gary Slater < gws77@...> wrote:

My friend is confident his fiberglass DX3 XL is well enough built.  But he is a bit concerned about the electronics?  Rocksim is giving him a number of almost 29!  Speed over 900mph max (~mach 1.2) Can the rocket and the electronics sustain that?  

 

He said he used lots of Rocket Poxy for construction.

It has a Perfect Flight and an RRC2 in the ebay.