red-naped sapsucker


Michael Perrone
 

An apparent red-naped sapsucker male was a bit north of Courtland, but in Yolo County, yesterday, January 3, along Waukeena Road (also called Road 145) a few hundred yards east of its junction with North Courtland Road (also called Road 157), in live oaks just past the first driveway east of the road junction.  The driveway is marked by two white poles, and the tree the bird was in most of the time is marked by crossed sticks and a small colored flag at the base of its trunk.  This is a paved levee road with very little vehicular traffic.  The sapsucker stayed high in the trees and moved around a lot, and so was hard to see well.

  It seemed faithful to the spot.  We found it as we walked north along Waukeena at about 9 AM, saw it again an hour or so later as we returned south, and again ten minutes later when we returned by car and got out to look for it.  Twice the bird flew across the slough to trees on the other side--and we feared it was gone for good--but each time it returned.

Michael Perrone
Davis


Andy Engilis
 

The sapsucker was present today at 4pm in the Cork Oak marked as Michael states,  a blue face mask is tied to sticks at tree base.  It looked good for Red-naped,  the black bib is not well formed but the facial lines are sharp.  It appeared to me to be a female.  The views were fleating as the bird was wary and stayed high in the tree.

Andy Engilis
Elk Grove

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From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> on behalf of Michael Perrone via groups.io <michaelperrone10@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 4, 2022 3:59:31 PM
To: Central Valley Birds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] red-naped sapsucker
 
An apparent red-naped sapsucker male was a bit north of Courtland, but in Yolo County, yesterday, January 3, along Waukeena Road (also called Road 145) a few hundred yards east of its junction with North Courtland Road (also called Road 157), in live oaks just past the first driveway east of the road junction.  The driveway is marked by two white poles, and the tree the bird was in most of the time is marked by crossed sticks and a small colored flag at the base of its trunk.  This is a paved levee road with very little vehicular traffic.  The sapsucker stayed high in the trees and moved around a lot, and so was hard to see well.

  It seemed faithful to the spot.  We found it as we walked north along Waukeena at about 9 AM, saw it again an hour or so later as we returned south, and again ten minutes later when we returned by car and got out to look for it.  Twice the bird flew across the slough to trees on the other side--and we feared it was gone for good--but each time it returned.

Michael Perrone
Davis