Date   

Yolo Red-necked Grebe

Emmett Iverson
 

Watching a Red-necked Grebe in the West Sac shipping channel. Storm bird. I would park at the Barge Canal Access and bike down the levee. Bird is here, (38.5605107, -121.5540329). 

Best,

Emmett Iverson

Sacramento 


Northern Shrike at Sacramento NWR

Andrew Rush
 

Hello.
I found a Northern Shrike at the Sacramento NWR this morning. It was in the willows in 
the northeast 'corner' of the refuge/auto route, along Logan Creek (39.43351, -122.15768). It was an immature. You can see some mediocre photos with the ebird post: https://ebird.org/checklist/S79936823
I was able to watch the bird for a while at close range.
Andrew Rush
San Francisco, CA


Talk by Teen Birder This Thursday

Elizabeth Gillogly
 

Hi, CA Birder Friends!

We live in Auburn, and my teenage daughter, Fiona Gillogly, is an avid birder and nature journaler (aka field sketching). She is giving a free talk online this Thursday, Jan 28 at 6pm as part of the Birdy Hour Speaker Series with the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory. Her talk is called: "Taken Under Their Wings: How Chickens and Supportive Mentors Launched My Passion for Birding and Nature Journaling." Fiona will discuss her journey as a birder and nature journaler, and she will also share some stories of those who have been key mentors on her birding journey (which includes some folks on this list!)

You may have heard Fiona speak the past 3 years at the Central Valley Bird Symposium, when, as the opening act for the Saturday dinner keynote speaker, she shared stories and her nature journal pages from the teen birding camps she was able to attend thanks to the CVBC Youth Birding Scholarships she has received. And we know that many on this list have contributed to those scholarships, so THANK YOU for your support. It has been such a transformative experience for her to spend time with others her age who are as crazy about birds as she is!


Here is the link to the event--it is free but registration is required. (You can also make an optional donation to SFBBO.):

If you are unable to attend, the recording will be posted in a week or so on this page (scroll to the bottom of the page): https://www.sfbbo.org/birdy.html

There are lots of fantastic past talks already archived there as well, so you may want to check them out. 

Happy Birding!

Beth Kelley Gillogly 


Mariposa, Fresno, and Madera continuing goodies

Bruce Mast
 

Good morning birders,
I returned last night from a weekend of birding with my brother around Mariposa, Fresno, and Madera counties, with a toe dip into Merced.

Mariposa County, Saturday, 1/23
There's a nice assemblage of ducks in the Merced River between Lake McSwaim and Hornitos Road, including a pair of GREATER SCAUP and a female LESSER SCAUP. (There was also a cluster of LESSER SCAUP down river on the Merced County side of Hornitos). Full checklists for Lake McSwaim and Merced River here:

We checked the blackbird flock at Merced Falls Road and Barrett Cove Road for TRICOLORED BLACKBIRDS. Most of the birds in the flock are Bicolored Red-winged Blackbirds but there were a number of birds with red and yellow epaulets, plus a handful with long narrow white stirpes on their folded wings. Checklist with the exact location at

Lake Mclure at Barrett Cove is extremely low and we could not find a single bird on the water, much less a rare loon or grebe. We also checked several farm ponds where David Suddjian used to report dabbling ducks back in the day. They are all empty mudholes. We drove up to Old Toll Road looking for Thrasher and Bell's Sparrow habitat but that area is still recovering from recent fire.

Descending White Rock Road, we encountered a large Savannah Sparrow flock with 4 VESPER SPARROWS at the dropped pin on this checklist.

Further down at the pond, there was still enough water to support a GREATER YELLOWLEGS and 4 LEAST SANDPIPERS. We picked out a BALD EAGLE perched on the ground atop a distant hill  to the north.

At the Merced-Mariposa county line, my brother picked out a distant PRAIRIE FALCON perched on a rock outcrop. I use the Earthmate app, which shows our GPS coordinates on a topo map with county lines, so we were able to confirm the bird was in Mariposa County.

On the Merced side of the line, we found a beautiful dark morph FERRUGINOUS HAWK.

Fresno County, Sunday, 1-24-21
Our only stop was on Rolinda Avenue to check on a couple COMMON GROUND DOVES found by Gary Woods on the 19th. We found the pair along the canal to the west, within 100 yards of the road. We first spotted them perched on the vineyard wires and then they dropped down to the dirt road on the north side of the canal. I expected to find them in the company of lots of Mourning Doves but they were by themselves.

Madera County, Sunday, 1-24-21
We next headed up to Road 8 to look for the female VERMILION FLYCATCHER found by Brian Sullivan on 1-18. We searched fruitlessly for about an hour but I checked again on the way home around 4 pm and turned up the bird. I first found her perched atop a tree in the orchard across the pasture. She then dropped down to the far fenceline. She moved south towards the house and I lost track of her.
Best information for birding the site is Gary Woods' checklist from 1-20. https://ebird.org/checklist/S79619892

Moving over to Madera Water Treatment Plant, we spent some quality time picking through the Canada Goose flock until we found a CACKLING GOOSE. My brother also found a leucistic Ruddy Duck with an all-white head. Odd looking bird. A PEREGRINE FALCON buzzed the waterfowl a couple times but came up empty.

We spent the afternoon at Sycamore Island, where we easily tracked down a recently reported CASSIN'S KINGBIRD on the wire to the north of the dirt road along the westernmost pond (about here: 36.855149, -119.832055). I later found a Cassin's Kingbird about here: 36.857518, -119.822356. So either the bird wanders or there are two. Other goodies included a Common Merganser, Spotted Sandpiper, and a Marsh Wren.

Bird on,

Bruce Mast
Oakland







Re: Yolo Cassin’s Finches

Kirk Swenson
 

The Cassin’s Finches continued today, but they didn’t make it easy. After a brief encounter with three CAFI around 8:45 in the same area where Bart had them yesterday, I could not refund them for the next hour or so. Eventually, I decided to follow a dirt bike trail to the top of the ridge overlooking the spot where I’d had the first three, where I found a flock of 14 or so at about 38°54′2″ N  122°18′58″ W. Upon coming back down to Rayhouse I ran into Emmett Iverson and Zane Pickus and the three of us birded the area for another hour or so without further success.

Good birding,
Kirk Swenson 
Davis, CA

On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 8:23 PM Konshau Duman <konshaud@...> wrote:
Dear Birders,

Today Lynette and I saw a flock of Cassin’s Finches on Rayhouse Road at 10:24. They were in the bottom of a canyon that the road goes into at (38.898955, -122.314494). At the time we could count 16 of them conservatively but there were more calling out of sight. After 25 minutes all the finches had left the canyon and flew along the mountain to the northeast. Bart Wickel visited later at 12:49 and re-found them in that canyon. He also saw them going down to Fiske Creek and drinking water, counting 25 in a tree at (38.901070, -122.311487). Unfortunately when we were on our way out around 16:00 they were gone. Based on our observations and Bart’s we can say that they came into the bottom of the canyon and left twice today so there may be hope of seeing them there again tomorrow. 

Good Luck!

Best,

Konshau Duman & Lynette Williams
Galt, CA 


Re: Putah Creek Christmas Bird Count 2020 Summary

Steve Hampton
 

All, 

I forgot this paragraph about the fire. We are preparing a separate article about this with more details. 

The count was notable for another reason: approximately 60% of the count was burned in the LNU Lightning Complex megafire in August 2020. A review of the 49-year history of the count suggests this fire was larger than all previous fires in the count circle combined. Specifically, the hills and canyons were often moonscaped, resulting in lower numbers of chaparral species, as well as displaced individuals (e.g. wrentits, thrashers) in unexpected areas. 





On Sun, Jan 24, 2021 at 3:41 PM Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:

The 50th Putah Creek Christmas Bird Count was held on December 20, 2020 under strict Covid protocol. Area leaders sought to cover all usual routes with teams of one to two local experienced birders only. Thus, the count was essentially closed to the public. No carpooling was allowed and social distancing was required.

 

Clear and calm weather made for a long and enjoyable counting day, ultimately tallying 143 species. 

 

As expected, the total number of participants was low, only 55 compared to the usual 85. The count was successful in covering all the usual routes, as evidenced by 206 party hours, the third highest total ever. This high number was largely driven by an extraordinary effort in Area 6, whose 38 party hours eclipsed the historical average of 13.

 

We traveled 121 miles on foot, a record high, and 171 miles by car.  The early hours were marked by 16.4 hours of owling, also a record high. 

 

There was one new species found on the count: a Black-throated Sparrow that was known to be over-wintering at a private residence in Area 4 (Yolo County).

     

Record high counts were set for seven species.  These were: Virginia Rail (7), Great-horned Owl (95), Anna's Hummingbird (262), Black Phoebe (252), Common Raven (450), White-breasted Nuthatch (236), and White-crowned Sparrow (3,011).

 

Many of the record high counts continue increasing trends among insectivores and fructivores, correlated with warmer winters and a lack of overnight freezes. Yellow-billed Magpies rebounded to their highest total since 2011, though still below pre-West Nile Virus numbers, especially when adjusted for party hours.

 

For the second year in a row, the only all-time low record was for Brewer's Blackbird (370).

 

Thanks to all the area leaders for assembling thorough coverage under pandemic conditions. We hope next year we can invite all birders and birders-to-be and finish the day with the comradery of a potluck.   


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Re: Putah Creek Christmas Bird Count 2020 Summary

szafrica77
 

Thanks for the update Steve!

Sarah Mayhew
Davis


On Jan 24, 2021, at 3:41 PM, Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:



The 50th Putah Creek Christmas Bird Count was held on December 20, 2020 under strict Covid protocol. Area leaders sought to cover all usual routes with teams of one to two local experienced birders only. Thus, the count was essentially closed to the public. No carpooling was allowed and social distancing was required.

 

Clear and calm weather made for a long and enjoyable counting day, ultimately tallying 143 species. 

 

As expected, the total number of participants was low, only 55 compared to the usual 85. The count was successful in covering all the usual routes, as evidenced by 206 party hours, the third highest total ever. This high number was largely driven by an extraordinary effort in Area 6, whose 38 party hours eclipsed the historical average of 13.

 

We traveled 121 miles on foot, a record high, and 171 miles by car.  The early hours were marked by 16.4 hours of owling, also a record high. 

 

There was one new species found on the count: a Black-throated Sparrow that was known to be over-wintering at a private residence in Area 4 (Yolo County).

     

Record high counts were set for seven species.  These were: Virginia Rail (7), Great-horned Owl (95), Anna's Hummingbird (262), Black Phoebe (252), Common Raven (450), White-breasted Nuthatch (236), and White-crowned Sparrow (3,011).

 

Many of the record high counts continue increasing trends among insectivores and fructivores, correlated with warmer winters and a lack of overnight freezes. Yellow-billed Magpies rebounded to their highest total since 2011, though still below pre-West Nile Virus numbers, especially when adjusted for party hours.

 

For the second year in a row, the only all-time low record was for Brewer's Blackbird (370).

 

Thanks to all the area leaders for assembling thorough coverage under pandemic conditions. We hope next year we can invite all birders and birders-to-be and finish the day with the comradery of a potluck.   


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Putah Creek Christmas Bird Count 2020 Summary

Steve Hampton
 

The 50th Putah Creek Christmas Bird Count was held on December 20, 2020 under strict Covid protocol. Area leaders sought to cover all usual routes with teams of one to two local experienced birders only. Thus, the count was essentially closed to the public. No carpooling was allowed and social distancing was required.

 

Clear and calm weather made for a long and enjoyable counting day, ultimately tallying 143 species. 

 

As expected, the total number of participants was low, only 55 compared to the usual 85. The count was successful in covering all the usual routes, as evidenced by 206 party hours, the third highest total ever. This high number was largely driven by an extraordinary effort in Area 6, whose 38 party hours eclipsed the historical average of 13.

 

We traveled 121 miles on foot, a record high, and 171 miles by car.  The early hours were marked by 16.4 hours of owling, also a record high. 

 

There was one new species found on the count: a Black-throated Sparrow that was known to be over-wintering at a private residence in Area 4 (Yolo County).

     

Record high counts were set for seven species.  These were: Virginia Rail (7), Great-horned Owl (95), Anna's Hummingbird (262), Black Phoebe (252), Common Raven (450), White-breasted Nuthatch (236), and White-crowned Sparrow (3,011).

 

Many of the record high counts continue increasing trends among insectivores and fructivores, correlated with warmer winters and a lack of overnight freezes. Yellow-billed Magpies rebounded to their highest total since 2011, though still below pre-West Nile Virus numbers, especially when adjusted for party hours.

 

For the second year in a row, the only all-time low record was for Brewer's Blackbird (370).

 

Thanks to all the area leaders for assembling thorough coverage under pandemic conditions. We hope next year we can invite all birders and birders-to-be and finish the day with the comradery of a potluck.   


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Eastern Phoebe, Cache Creek, Yolo County, Jan 24 2021

Brent Campos
 

Fellow bird watchers,

There was an Eastern Phoebe along Cache Creek today. Coordinates for the bird and a photo are in an eBird checklist, here. To see this bird, from the Wild Wings access point (directions here) walk west on the gravel road along the dry canal to the "western pond," an old mining borrow pit filled in with emergent marsh vegetation and ringed with Gooding's willow. If you have not birded at Wild Wings County Park before, or haven't recently, you will notice relatively new No Trespassing signage along this gravel road. The land to the west of the County Park, between the canal and the creek channel is owned by the Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District. The assistant general manager for YCFCWCD has informed me that: "The property is still considered private property, but we are allowing respectful walkers to still enjoy the path."

Brent Campos
Woodland


Loon and trespassing--PLEASE READ

Jim Rowoth
 

Birders—both resident and visiting:

I shouldn’t have to do this, but I am continuing to see reports that show clear evidence of TRESPASSING.  Please don’t kill the goose that lays the golden egg!

The ONLY area of Bouldin Island that is available to birding is the Highway 12 corridor—and as you know, that high traffic road is dangerous and stopping anywhere is not advised.  Any and all roads leading off the highway are private property (whether signed or not) and are absolutely, positively off-limits to the general public—and that means us, the birdwatching community.

The ONLY area of Staten Island that is available to birding is Staten Island Road as far south as the equipment shed and collapsing water tower on the west side of the road.   There is a sign there that clearly states that public access ends there.  The road further south and all levees are absolutely, positively off-limits to the general public—and that means us, the birdwatching community.  

Westgate Landing County Park is open to the public (day use fee) and allows access to the levee at the park.  Where the actual property boundary lies is not clear to me, however.

Access directly under the Tower Park bridge is fuzzy, but if you choose this site, I again recommend that you make it a brief visit (get the bird and go), and that you not turn it into a party—the fewer visitors at a time the better.  Too bad if you can’t get a “gallery quality” photo. C’est la vie.

As David Yee stated in his post on 01/17/21, good relations with property owners/management at Bouldin Island and Staten Island are essential for continued access by San Joaquin Audubon for our annual Christmas Bird Count and other bird surveys.  Please don’t spoil this for our local birding community!


Yolo Cassin’s Finches

Konshau Duman
 

Dear Birders,

Today Lynette and I saw a flock of Cassin’s Finches on Rayhouse Road at 10:24. They were in the bottom of a canyon that the road goes into at (38.898955, -122.314494). At the time we could count 16 of them conservatively but there were more calling out of sight. After 25 minutes all the finches had left the canyon and flew along the mountain to the northeast. Bart Wickel visited later at 12:49 and re-found them in that canyon. He also saw them going down to Fiske Creek and drinking water, counting 25 in a tree at (38.901070, -122.311487). Unfortunately when we were on our way out around 16:00 they were gone. Based on our observations and Bart’s we can say that they came into the bottom of the canyon and left twice today so there may be hope of seeing them there again tomorrow. 

Good Luck!

Best,

Konshau Duman & Lynette Williams
Galt, CA 


Re: Baikal Teal

Bruce Deuel
 

The answer is no, there were no postings.  Up until the 2005 bird in So. Cal. all California's records of Baikal Teal were of hunter shot birds, and none of them were seen by anybody else before hand.

Bruce Deuel
Red Bluff



From: "Dawn Garcia" <avifan59@...>
To: "centralvalleybirds" <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2021 10:18:02 AM
Subject: Re: [centralvalleybirds] Baikal Teal

I'm curious if there were any postings about this bird prior to it being shot?  It reminds me of the Long-tailed duck in Oroville that was found on the Oroville CBC, posted about (ebird, CVB,other?) for a couple of weeks and then a friend and I saw it shot. CDWF said there was a group of poachers in Oroville that would target rare waterfowl for their personal collections. And they would check birding lists to help them target those birds. It was an eye-opener for me. In this case, the shooting was illegal because it was killed in a state park. CSU Chico ended up with duck for the museum.
Does anyone know if the teal might have been targeted for its rarity?

Dawn Garcia
Dana Point, CA


"when I walk with nature, my joy is full, my soul is free!"
  Lola


Re: Baikal Teal

Dawn Garcia
 

I'm curious if there were any postings about this bird prior to it being shot?  It reminds me of the Long-tailed duck in Oroville that was found on the Oroville CBC, posted about (ebird, CVB,other?) for a couple of weeks and then a friend and I saw it shot. CDWF said there was a group of poachers in Oroville that would target rare waterfowl for their personal collections. And they would check birding lists to help them target those birds. It was an eye-opener for me. In this case, the shooting was illegal because it was killed in a state park. CSU Chico ended up with duck for the museum.
Does anyone know if the teal might have been targeted for its rarity?

Dawn Garcia
Dana Point, CA


"when I walk with nature, my joy is full, my soul is free!"
  Lola


Pine Siskins - Salmonella

Sally M. Walters
 

Apologies for this duplicate message and the late posting: There have been several emails noting Pine Siskins dying from Salmonella. While this is not normal, it has occurred in the past. The advice is to remove feeders and water for the next few weeks. I am now scattering seed in my yard in leaf duff and near shrubbery per advice below. 

California Department of Fish and Game posted this on their website as a reference.
REMOVE FEEDERS AND WATER for 14 days if you have dead or dying birds. Wash feeders and birdbaths with Clorox solution and wash your hands - Salmonella is everywhere. If the birds are alive contact your local Human Society.

National Audubon: "The best advice if you observe sick birds is to take down feeders [and remove water] to help the birds “social distance”. By taking feeders down for 14 days, we help the birds disperse and limit their exposure through concentrated feeding. Remember that the very best way to support birds in our yards and neighborhoods is with native plants and leaving leaf litter alone because natural foraging behavior doesn’t create the same high disease transmission risk that bird feeders do.” https://audubonportland.org/blog/help-pine-siskins-by-practicing-safe-bird-feeding/

Sally M Walters
Retired Wildlife Biologist
Past President of Sacramento Audubon



Re: Baikal Teal shot in Colusa County

Steve Pagliughi
 

 
To clarify, the daily limit on ducks is 7 (and the regulation language is "ducks"). Therefore, any duck that happens to show up can be harvested but one hunter would only be allowed to harvest 7 per day. Keep in mind that the regulations also state how many ducks of certain species can be harvested per day and count towards the daily bag limit of 7 (e.g., only 1 pintail is allowed to be harvested per day). However, species that dont occur here frequently are not included in this language so 7 Baikal Teal could be legally harvested by one hunter in one day.
 
Same applies to geese.

Steve Pagliughi
 

On Thursday, January 21, 2021, 05:25:09 PM PST, Clifford Hawley <yellowhammerca@...> wrote:
 
 
My understanding is that the way state game laws are written that unless there is a bag limit on a duck or goose species it can be shot. Since Baikal Teal is not expected to even be here there is no bag limit so it is legal to take. 

Cliff Hawley
Sacramento, CA

On Thu, Jan 21, 2021, 5:20 PM Larry Jordan <thelarryjordan@...> wrote:
Just a question. Is it legal to shoot a non-native (vagrant) species in the US?
Larry

On Thu, Jan 21, 2021 at 3:11 PM Andy Engilis via groups.io <aengilisjr=ucdavis.edu@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks everyone for your feedback on the bird with CDWF help we are on the track of that bird now.  Andy
 
 

From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> on behalf of rosita94598 via groups.io <rosita94598=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2021 9:49 AM
To: Central Valley Birds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] Baikal Teal shot in Colusa County
 
Don't know how many of you picked up on this one, but the eBird rarity message had this report late last night. 
 
 
Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek

 

 


--

Clifford Hawley 
Sacramento, CA

"For, what are the voices of birds...
But words, our words, 
Only so much more sweet?"   
Robert Browning


Re: Baikal Teal shot in Colusa County

John Muegge
 

Federal Migratory Game Bird Laws, not state determine the bag limits on certain species and totals for
all species of waterfowl in California.  In the zone that this bird was shot, the total duck bag limit is 7. This bird, even though not expected, would still be included in the general duck bag limit for the zone that it was killed.

John C. Muegge
Redding



On Thursday, January 21, 2021, 5:25:04 PM PST, Clifford Hawley <yellowhammerca@...> wrote:


My understanding is that the way state game laws are written that unless there is a bag limit on a duck or goose species it can be shot. Since Baikal Teal is not expected to even be here there is no bag limit so it is legal to take. 

Cliff Hawley
Sacramento, CA

On Thu, Jan 21, 2021, 5:20 PM Larry Jordan <thelarryjordan@...> wrote:
Just a question. Is it legal to shoot a non-native (vagrant) species in the US?
Larry


On Thu, Jan 21, 2021 at 3:11 PM Andy Engilis via groups.io <aengilisjr=ucdavis.edu@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks everyone for your feedback on the bird with CDWF help we are on the track of that bird now.  Andy


From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> on behalf of rosita94598 via groups.io <rosita94598=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2021 9:49 AM
To: Central Valley Birds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] Baikal Teal shot in Colusa County
 
Don't know how many of you picked up on this one, but the eBird rarity message had this report late last night. 


Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


--

Clifford Hawley 
Sacramento, CA

"For, what are the voices of birds...
But words, our words, 
Only so much more sweet?"   
Robert Browning


Re: Baikal Teal shot in Colusa County

Clifford Hawley
 

My understanding is that the way state game laws are written that unless there is a bag limit on a duck or goose species it can be shot. Since Baikal Teal is not expected to even be here there is no bag limit so it is legal to take. 

Cliff Hawley
Sacramento, CA

On Thu, Jan 21, 2021, 5:20 PM Larry Jordan <thelarryjordan@...> wrote:
Just a question. Is it legal to shoot a non-native (vagrant) species in the US?
Larry


On Thu, Jan 21, 2021 at 3:11 PM Andy Engilis via groups.io <aengilisjr=ucdavis.edu@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks everyone for your feedback on the bird with CDWF help we are on the track of that bird now.  Andy


From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> on behalf of rosita94598 via groups.io <rosita94598=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2021 9:49 AM
To: Central Valley Birds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] Baikal Teal shot in Colusa County
 
Don't know how many of you picked up on this one, but the eBird rarity message had this report late last night. 


Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


--

Clifford Hawley 
Sacramento, CA

"For, what are the voices of birds...
But words, our words, 
Only so much more sweet?"   
Robert Browning


Re: Baikal Teal shot in Colusa County

Larry Jordan
 

Just a question. Is it legal to shoot a non-native (vagrant) species in the US?
Larry


On Thu, Jan 21, 2021 at 3:11 PM Andy Engilis via groups.io <aengilisjr=ucdavis.edu@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks everyone for your feedback on the bird with CDWF help we are on the track of that bird now.  Andy


From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> on behalf of rosita94598 via groups.io <rosita94598=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2021 9:49 AM
To: Central Valley Birds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] Baikal Teal shot in Colusa County
 
Don't know how many of you picked up on this one, but the eBird rarity message had this report late last night. 


Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: Baikal Teal shot in Colusa County

Andy Engilis
 

Thanks everyone for your feedback on the bird with CDWF help we are on the track of that bird now.  Andy


From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> on behalf of rosita94598 via groups.io <rosita94598@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2021 9:49 AM
To: Central Valley Birds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] Baikal Teal shot in Colusa County
 
Don't know how many of you picked up on this one, but the eBird rarity message had this report late last night. 


Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


yellow- billed loon

Jim Holmes
 

Still present at Terminous.  seen from under the highway 12 bridge.
It basically swam from 38.118527,-121.510005 to 38.118527,-121.510005


Thanks,

Jim Holmes
sacramento
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