Date   

Green-tailed Towhee

kuschmanfred
 

Today a Green-tailed Towhee made an appearance in my garden on the south bank of Putah Creek about a mile downstream from Stevenson Bridge. Perhaps the same bird I reported a little while ago from the Yolo side of the creek, but possibly also a different individual.
A Say’s Phoebe has begun its winter-long nightly roost on an abandoned Barn Swallow nest on my front porch, a clear sign of the changing season.

Manfred Kusch
South bank of Putah Creek
3 miles west of Davis


Re: Continuing Blackpoll SAC--Gristmill access, American River

Kathryn Tobias
 

I would love to go out with others.  Anybody going this weekend so I could tag along?

 

Kathryn

Pronouns Ze/Zir

https://www.mypronouns.org/ze-zir

Sacramento 

From: Chris Conard
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 10:06 AM
To: centralvalleybirds@groups.io
Subject: Re: [centralvalleybirds] Continuing Blackpoll SAC--Gristmill access, American River

 

Hi folks, 

 

Jeri Langham just refound the Blackpoll Warbler about 50 yards upstream of where it was on Sunday (see below).

 

On Sun, Sep 20, 2020

 

Jeri Langham just found a/the Blackpoll Warbler just downstream of the Gristmill access. A few of us have seen it. 

 

From the entrance road over the levee to Gristmill, it's only about 200 yards downstream along the river. It has been foraging in an oak near a large broken-off walnut about here: 38.575701,-121.347509

 

Good luck, 

 

Chris 

 

Chris Conard
Sacramento
--please excuse this brief message sent with my phone

_._,_._

 

 


Re: Continuing Blackpoll SAC--Gristmill access, American River

Chris Conard
 

Hi folks, 

Jeri Langham just refound the Blackpoll Warbler about 50 yards upstream of where it was on Sunday (see below).

On Sun, Sep 20, 2020

Jeri Langham just found a/the Blackpoll Warbler just downstream of the Gristmill access. A few of us have seen it. 

From the entrance road over the levee to Gristmill, it's only about 200 yards downstream along the river. It has been foraging in an oak near a large broken-off walnut about here: 38.575701,-121.347509

Good luck, 

Chris 

Chris Conard
Sacramento
--please excuse this brief message sent with my phone

_._,_._


Re: Buff-br Sandpiper at Yolo Bypass this evening

Leo Edson <leoedson@...>
 

Still present at 7:30 (now).


On Sep 22, 2020, at 9:22 PM, Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:


The Buff-br Sandpiper was present this evening at 5:00 for about 15 minutes when it disappeared. Baird's and Pectorals also around, but the birds bounce around a bit within the large pond. 


good birding, 

--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Buff-br Sandpiper at Yolo Bypass this evening

Steve Hampton
 

The Buff-br Sandpiper was present this evening at 5:00 for about 15 minutes when it disappeared. Baird's and Pectorals also around, but the birds bounce around a bit within the large pond. 


good birding, 

--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Modest migration in Red Bluff

Bruce Deuel
 

Hi all,
This morning I killed some time waiting for my car windshield to be replaced by walking along Reeds Creek between Jefferson and South Jackson Streets in Red Bluff. I found several Yellow, 3 Black-throated Gray, and an Orange-crowned for warblers, a Downy Woodpecker, a House Wren, 38 flyover Greater White-fronted Geese, and a Gray Fox. Not impressive (except for the fox, running across an open field at 1015) but I just wanted folks to know I'm still alive and do get out to bird occasionally!
Cheers,
Bruce Deuel
Red Bluff


[SJBirds] Tennessee Warbler at Lodi Lake—Laurel Ave Area, Lodi SJ Co.

Frances Oliver <hummer52@...>
 

Posting this for folks interested in chasing a Tennessee Warbler in SJ Co.  A number of us were able to see this bird throughout the morning up until we all left around 1230. It tended to feed in the oak tree that overhangs Laurel Avenue directly across from the house;1012 Laurel Avenue. It disappeared for a little bit but was usually found in the same tree that David discovered it this AM @ 930AM. 

Laurel Ave is the short street on the East edge of Lodi Lake Park in Lodi.

Good Birding!
Frances
Lodi, CA 


Subject: [SJBirds] Tennessee Warbler at Lodi Lake


Birders,

There is currently a Tennessee Warbler in the Valley Oaks along Laurel Ave at Lodi Lake. It's being extremely cooperative. The warbler numbers here are really impressive this morning.

There are also lots of people.

Happy Fall,
David Yee
Stockton


bobolink at Cosumnes River Preserve

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

Late this morning I found a Bobolink that might conceivably be visible from Desmond Road.  Initially south of the caretaker's home, the bird flew off when approached by a harrier and seemed to land near the TNC Barn at 6500 Desmond Road.  The wet, weedy fields along Desmond Road might possibly be of interest to this bird.

Warbler variety and numbers along Wood Duck Slough were much diminished from yesterday.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


Re: Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area shorebirds

naturestoc
 

I had four Baird's Sandpipers at about 1030 am in the eastern portion of these ponds near rice point which is the eastern most point of the north auto tour route. 

Dan Brown 
Sacramento 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Leo Edson <leoedson@...>
Date: 9/22/20 9:50 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: cvbirds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [centralvalleybirds] Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area shorebirds

I don’t think the Buff-breasted Sandpiper has been seen since 8am. There are still folks searching. Birds are moving around a lot but primarily utilizing three different ponded areas only one of which is easily scoped from the main road.. 

Four Pectoral Sandpipers flew in at 9:45.

Leo Edson
Sacramento 


On Sep 22, 2020, at 8:34 AM, Leo Edson <leoedson@...> wrote:

Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Rice Pt. Rd. at 8am this morning. Flew do with other peeps after a minute or two. A few of us are waiting for its return.

Leo Edson 
Sacramento 


On Sep 22, 2020, at 5:59 AM, Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:


All, 

They have sculpted the large pond north of Rice Pt Rd at the YBWA (the pond where the gulls roosted last winter) into swales and islands. They've started putting water in the swales and shorebirds have found it. Yesterday evening there were 2 Baird's and 2 Pectoral Sandpipers out in the open. Full list at https://ebird.org/checklist/S73908732.

For a map of YBWA with Rice Pt marked, see here in the center column.  http://www.tertial.us/yolobirds/yolo.html

Construction on the main intake canal continues. This will facilitate water mgmt in the future. The bridge at the "Y" was open the other day but again closed for detour yesterday. Regardless, the place to go now is probably Rice Pt Rd. 

Note there are also lots of shorebirds at Davis WTP-- dowitchers and a few Pectorals in the green/yellow wet grass. Park by the trees in the visitor parking area and walk back to the pond. 

good birding, 


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Re: Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area shorebirds

Leo Edson <leoedson@...>
 

I don’t think the Buff-breasted Sandpiper has been seen since 8am. There are still folks searching. Birds are moving around a lot but primarily utilizing three different ponded areas only one of which is easily scoped from the main road.. 

Four Pectoral Sandpipers flew in at 9:45.

Leo Edson
Sacramento 


On Sep 22, 2020, at 8:34 AM, Leo Edson <leoedson@...> wrote:

Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Rice Pt. Rd. at 8am this morning. Flew do with other peeps after a minute or two. A few of us are waiting for its return.

Leo Edson 
Sacramento 


On Sep 22, 2020, at 5:59 AM, Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:


All, 

They have sculpted the large pond north of Rice Pt Rd at the YBWA (the pond where the gulls roosted last winter) into swales and islands. They've started putting water in the swales and shorebirds have found it. Yesterday evening there were 2 Baird's and 2 Pectoral Sandpipers out in the open. Full list at https://ebird.org/checklist/S73908732.

For a map of YBWA with Rice Pt marked, see here in the center column.  http://www.tertial.us/yolobirds/yolo.html

Construction on the main intake canal continues. This will facilitate water mgmt in the future. The bridge at the "Y" was open the other day but again closed for detour yesterday. Regardless, the place to go now is probably Rice Pt Rd. 

Note there are also lots of shorebirds at Davis WTP-- dowitchers and a few Pectorals in the green/yellow wet grass. Park by the trees in the visitor parking area and walk back to the pond. 

good birding, 


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Re: Greater White-fronts

Bob & Carol
 

We had them much of the night off Hilltop Drive in Redding also.

Sent From
Bob & Carol Yutzy
Redding, Ca

On Sep 22, 2020, at 6:23 AM, Brewbird <michele31@...> wrote:

Hi all,

Since I’m such a light sleeper, I got to enjoy the sounds of thousands of Greater White-fronted Geese heading south over the house. It seemed like there was never a time I didn’t hear them, all night long.

Michele Swartout 
Red Bluff

"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." - John Muir.

--
Michele Swartout
Red Bluff


Re: Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area shorebirds

Leo Edson <leoedson@...>
 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Rice Pt. Rd. at 8am this morning. Flew do with other peeps after a minute or two. A few of us are waiting for its return.

Leo Edson 
Sacramento 


On Sep 22, 2020, at 5:59 AM, Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:


All, 

They have sculpted the large pond north of Rice Pt Rd at the YBWA (the pond where the gulls roosted last winter) into swales and islands. They've started putting water in the swales and shorebirds have found it. Yesterday evening there were 2 Baird's and 2 Pectoral Sandpipers out in the open. Full list at https://ebird.org/checklist/S73908732.

For a map of YBWA with Rice Pt marked, see here in the center column.  http://www.tertial.us/yolobirds/yolo.html

Construction on the main intake canal continues. This will facilitate water mgmt in the future. The bridge at the "Y" was open the other day but again closed for detour yesterday. Regardless, the place to go now is probably Rice Pt Rd. 

Note there are also lots of shorebirds at Davis WTP-- dowitchers and a few Pectorals in the green/yellow wet grass. Park by the trees in the visitor parking area and walk back to the pond. 

good birding, 


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Greater White-fronts

Brewbird
 

Hi all,

Since I’m such a light sleeper, I got to enjoy the sounds of thousands of Greater White-fronted Geese heading south over the house. It seemed like there was never a time I didn’t hear them, all night long.

Michele Swartout 
Red Bluff

"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." - John Muir.

--
Michele Swartout
Red Bluff


Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area shorebirds

Steve Hampton
 

All, 

They have sculpted the large pond north of Rice Pt Rd at the YBWA (the pond where the gulls roosted last winter) into swales and islands. They've started putting water in the swales and shorebirds have found it. Yesterday evening there were 2 Baird's and 2 Pectoral Sandpipers out in the open. Full list at https://ebird.org/checklist/S73908732.

For a map of YBWA with Rice Pt marked, see here in the center column.  http://www.tertial.us/yolobirds/yolo.html

Construction on the main intake canal continues. This will facilitate water mgmt in the future. The bridge at the "Y" was open the other day but again closed for detour yesterday. Regardless, the place to go now is probably Rice Pt Rd. 

Note there are also lots of shorebirds at Davis WTP-- dowitchers and a few Pectorals in the green/yellow wet grass. Park by the trees in the visitor parking area and walk back to the pond. 

good birding, 


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Cosumnes birds the last three days of summer

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

On Saturday I did this month's Tall Forest bird survey.  In ordinary times this survey is the one opportunity for the public to visit behind the Farm Center gate.  But management at the preserve has decided that all docent-led activities are suspended until Covid-19 comes under control.  So for most of this year these have been solo surveys.  I really regret that I am unable at present to show the place to people who have never seen it before.

I tallied 77 species on a six-hour survey of the Accidental Forest, the Tall Forest and the surrounding rice and fallow fields.  There were no highlights really.  The better birds for this survey were these:
acorn woodpecker-  3
western wood-pewee-  5
loggerhead shrike-  1
yellow-billed magpie-  2
hermit thrush-  1
orange-crowned warbler-  1
common yellowthroat-  12
yellow warbler-  12
Audubon's warbler-  1 (FOS)
black-throated gray warbler-  7
Townsend's warbler-  4
Wilson's warbler-  16
western tanager-  15

The survey was notable for all the birds that were singing with gusto.  Not every individual of each of these species was really belting out its song, but some representatives of these species were: mourning dove, Virginia rail, red-shouldered hawk (these guys were going crazy!), Hutton's vireo, house wren, Bewick's wren, wrentit, house finch, lesser goldfinch, song sparrow, spotted towhee, and red-winged blackbird.  Song sparrow, at least, provided evidence that the breeding season is still upon us.  Two juveniles with swollen, yellow gape flanges were accompanied by an adult along Wood Duck Slough.

Yesterday I parked at the Accidental Forest and walked from there to the east side "edge" and then down Wood Duck Slough.  From the pump station I walked out the west side road to Oak Island, then made a big loop through the rice and along some ditches before getting back to the car.  I then visited the shack, at which point the air started distinctly to smell of smoke.  So I quit walking, checked the shorebird spots and called it a morning by 10:30.  The birding in the woods was slow, and there was evident turnover especially in the birds along Wood Duck Slough and at the shack.  The highlights included my FOS pine siskin, a blue-gray gnatcatcher and two lazuli buntings.  After yesterday's rather poor showing with bushtits, I ran into four big flocks this morning.  None had any associated migrants.  Birds of modest interest included these:
sandhill crane-  45 (27 north of the Pole Barn were my first on the ground)
killdeer-  33
long-billed curlew-  1
least sandpiper-  64
peep sp.-  20
long-billed dowitcher-  473
Wilson's snipe-  4
greater yellowlegs-  41
acorn woodpecker-  1
western wood-pewee-  1
western flycatcher-  1
ruby-crowned kinglet-  1
blue-gray gnatcatcher-  1
pine siskin-  1 (vocal fly-over just off the Equipment Pad)
orange-crowned warbler-  4
MacGillivray's warbler-  1
common yellowthroat-  7
yellow warbler-  2 
Audubon's warbler-  2
black-throated gray warbler-  5
hermit warbler-  1
Wilson's warbler-  10
western tanager-  12
lazuli bunting-  2

Today was the sort of day that I always hope for during migration, with lots of migrants to look through in the woods.  I started again at the Accidental Forest parking spot but instead I made the long walk south along the river to the southeastern margin of the Tall Forest, then back to the north along the east edge of the forest block, then back to the car along the road.  The only reliable time that I do this is on the CBC.  That took a couple of hours and the highlight was a bad look at a good bird, a long-eared owl flying away through the trees.  I had a few migrant songbirds on this loop but not many.  But migrants were packed in along Wood Duck Slough.  I had five fair or better mixed flocks, one was very good and another was super.  The highlight was in the super flock- a blackpoll warbler.  I also had my FOS golden-crowned sparrow.  It took three hours to go down Wood Duck Slough to the pump station and hustle back along the West Side Road.  Then I checked the shorebird spots.  These are just about toast, but in looking I found my FOS Say's phoebe and my FOS American pipits.  Today's mentionables then:
killdeer-  25
least sandpiper-  44
long-billed dowitcher-  1
Wilson's snipe-  9
greater yellowlegs-  4
long-eared owl-  1
western flycatcher-  2
Empidonax sp.-  1
Say's phoebe-  1 (FOS)
warbling vireo-  2
American pipit-  4 (FOS)
golden-crowned sparrow-  1 (FOS)
orange-crowned warbler-  12
MacGillivray's warbler-  1
common yellowthroat-  5
yellow warbler-  35
blackpoll warbler-  1
Audubon's warbler-  4
black-throated gray warbler-  12
Townsend's warbler-  4
hermit warbler-  2
Wilson's warbler-  18
western tanager-  15

Autumn begins at 06:30 PDT tomorrow.  I hope that there are some nice avian surprises in store for all of us.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


Cos white-crown sparrow

Sally M. Walters
 

Feeding on tube feeder not on the ground per usual

Sally Walters Schmoldt
Sacramento CA


Magnolia Warbler and others in Southern Yolo County

Andy Engilis
 

All – Today at 11am I found a HY Magnolia Warbler along Pumphouse Road west of South River Road near the town of Clarksburg.    My phone gps placed the location at coordinates 34.4311 and -121.53795. It was in the understory of oaks along the southern side of Pumphouse Road It was in a group of yellow warblers and one Hutton’s Vireo (which is also unusual for this area) at 11 am.  It offered a  quick look before it flited off – as did the yellow warbler.  It was very active and the small flock worked its way south across the slough; they were on the move.  I tried to relocate the bird up until around 11:30 with no luck.  Hopefully someone will find that bird again.

 

Just south Birding along Elk Slough was good, although they just mowed the sides of the levee.  There were dozens of Yellow and Orange-crowned warblers moving through, with many orestra type Orange crowns (gray heads).  Also amazing was a single male Varied Thrush with a flock of waxwings and robins along Elk Slough.  This is the earliest by far for Varied Thrush for me.  Could this bird be fire displaced?   Several Willow and PS Flycatchers.  Crowned sparrows were  in numbers today.

 

Good Birding

 

Andy Engilis

Elk Grove

 

 

 

Andrew Engilis, Jr.

Curator

Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology

Dept of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology

One Shield Avenue

University of California

Davis, CA 95616

USA

 

Office Phone:  530-752-0364

Cell: 530-902-1881

FAX: 530-752-4154

E-mail:  aengilisjr@...

Website:  http://mwfb.ucdavis.edu

 


Putah Creek fall arrivals and departures

kuschmanfred
 

To add to the multiple reports of White-crowned Sparrows showing up in people’s backyards in the last couple of days, a large group of at least a dozen of them suddenly showed up today at my seed feeder and on my lawn. Apparently they decided to forego a slow build-up in numbers as in past years and moved in in full force. Mixed in with them was a pretty Lincoln’s Sparrow although it stayed mostly on the margins of the group. No Golden-crowned yet although they are typically only “minutes” behind. A first Fox Sparrow showed up today at the warbler bathing spot where traffic is still fairly strong, still mostly Yellow Warblers, but also Wilson’s, Black-throated Gray, and Orange-crowned. The numbers of Yellow-rumped Warblers are increasing daily, still all first-year birds, and soon should overtake the Yellow Warblers whose migration should fade within the next week or so.

In my garden the breeding season has officially come to a close with the fledging of four Barn Swallows from the nest on my back porch that, as in the past 2 years, has hosted 3 broods. I take down used swallow nests during the winter since on occasion they have fallen down when re-used the following year. This particular pair of swallows has rebuilt their nest always in the same spot and has proceeded to successfully undertake three broods even though the youngsters of the last brood don’t get to leave the nest until all of the other swallows have left long ago. Even now, five days after their first flights they still return to the nest at night and sporadically during the day to be fed by their parents. Of the six pairs of swallows that nested on my house this year only one pair attempted a second brood which failed due to the excessive heat. So three successful third broods, producing 12 fledglings for three years in a row, are especially note-worthy.

Black-chinned Hummingbirds have all left for their wintering grounds in Mexico leaving behind only Anna’s in my garden although I still observed a Rufous hummer two days ago.



Manfred Kusch
South bank of Putah Creek
3 miles W of Davis





Re: Continuing Blackpoll SAC--Gristmill access, American River

Chris Conard
 

Hi folks, 

The bird continues at the same location at 1225.

Chris Conard
Sacramento
--please excuse this brief message sent with my phone

On Sun, Sep 20, 2020, 9:54 AM Chris Conard via groups.io <conardc=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi folks, 

Jeri Langham just found a/the Blackpoll Warbler just downstream of the Gristmill access. A few of us have seen it. 

From the entrance road over the levee to Gristmill, it's only about 200 yards downstream along the river. It has been foraging in an oak near a large broken-off walnut about here: 38.575701,-121.347509

Good luck, 

Chris 

Chris Conard
Sacramento
--please excuse this brief message sent with my phone


Re: Crowned sparrows

naturestoc
 

I had white-crowned Sparrows in rosemont, Sacramento County,  this morning. 
Dan Brown, 
Sacramento 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Brewbird <michele31@...>
Date: 9/20/20 8:24 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: Central Valley Birds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] Crowned sparrows

Hi all,
I’ve been enjoying watching the White-crown numbers gaining in my backyard, since the first couple showed up last Sunday. Today, I just had my first Golden-crowned Sparrow appear. I’ve also been graced by a cute, little Lincoln’s Sparrow, for a couple days now. A bird that has only been in the yard a couple times in the past.

Happy birding!
Michele Swartout
Red Bluff

"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." - John Muir.

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