Date   

Swainson's Hawk Nests?/Sightings?

Daniel Edelstein <edelstein@...>
 

Please help me (a biologist, who works in Oakland/Bay Area) with a tidbit of
information I'm seeking:

In order to conserve SWAINSON'S HAWKS' foraging habitat in the event of any
new development, the town of Rio Visita would like know the whereabouts of
active SWAINSON'S HAWK nest locations near Rio Vista, Solano County.

Can anyone help me?

You might know the contact information of someone I should contact?

Thanks, Daniel Edelstein
Project Biologist
Impact Sciences, Inc.

510-267-0494 x34 (work)
415-382-1827 (home)


Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area new hours

Steve Hampton <shampton@...>
 

The YBWA re-opened today with the following hours:
Mon - Fri: sunrise to 5:00 p.m.
Weekends: sunrise to sunset



Steve Hampton
________________
Resource Economist
Office of Spill Prevention and Response
California Dept of Fish and Game
PO Box 944209
Sacramento, CA 94244-2090
-----------------------------------
(916) 323-4724 phone
(916) 324-8829 fax


Fazio Yolo Wildlife Area locked up

tertial <shampton@...>
 

FYI, due to budget cuts, the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area between
Sacramento and Davis is currently locked up and closed. It may re-
open with limited hours. If you are outraged, feel free to contact
your local newspapers, representatives, legislators, etc.-- perhaps
even Vic Fazio himself (although I cannot find contact information
for him). They only use seasonals to manage the gates, but their
current budget is woefully inadequate for even that.

Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


early Yolo HAFL, 12-Apr-04

Jon King <jonrking@...>
 

Among a small wave of migrants early this morning at a private site a few
miles NNW of Winters was a Hammond's Flycatcher, which appears to be the
second earliest known spring record for Yolo County.

At this site small numbers of Black-throated Gray and Wilson's warblers,
and Ash-throated Flycatchers, have been daily for at least a week now,
apparently arriving earlier here than at some other locations in Yolo Co.

Cheers, Jon.


Yolo Co. migrants

ADAMSON, Roger H.
 

A check of the roads and sloughs between West Sacramento and Clarksburg (Bable Slough Rd, the Wood Duck ponds and Pumphouse Road) on sunday yielded a few migrants: Townsend Warbler on Babel Slough Rd; Black-throated Gray Warbler at the Wood Duck Ponds; an Ash-Throated Flycatcher on Pumphouse Rd; and numerous Bullocks Orioles on both Pumphouse Rd and on South River Rd at Clarksburg.

Roger


Davis migrants

Steve Hampton <shampton@...>
 

The last few days in north Davis have produced the first trickle of
migrants:
a few ORANGE-CR WARBLERS and COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, plus 1 WILSON'S and
1 BLK-THR GRAY WARBLER. Also of interest was a PURPLE FINCH on Saturday
morning.

good birding,



Steve Hampton
________________
Resource Economist
Office of Spill Prevention and Response
California Dept of Fish and Game
PO Box 944209
Sacramento, CA 94244-2090
-----------------------------------
(916) 323-4724 phone
(916) 324-8829 fax


Swainson's Hawks no longer at Ancil Hoffman Park

Ed Harper
 

Hello birders,

The excitement generated by the sight of Swainson's Hawks bringing
in nesting material to a eucalyptus tree at Ancil Hoffman Park along
the American River Parkway has fallen away to disappointment.
Although seen actively working on a nest on both April 5th and 6th,
repeated checks have failed to reveal further activity and the birds
have not been seen again. Perhaps an aggressive pair of Red-
shouldered Hawks in the vicinity prompted the Swainson's Hawks to
abandon their nesting attempt at that location. Nevertheless, the
event was intriguing and many of us were cheering for the success of
the birds.

A two-hour visit to Ancil Hoffman Park yesterday logged 57 species
but no Swainson's Hawks. Notable was a migratory movement of
Chipping Sparrows for the day and a singing Wilson's Warbler was the
first of the year for my observations along this portion of the
American River.

Enjoy the spring birding,

Ed Harper


Sutter County, Bobelaine Sanctuary

Kathryn <wordtiller@...>
 

My nature walk at the Bobelaine Audubon Sanctuary turned out to be quite exciting for me yesterday. I saw a Swainson's Hawk and a Forster's Tern, both lifebirds for me. Also a first - although not a bird - was something I thought was a snake until I saw the legs. It was about a foot long and I have tentively identified it as a (San Francisco) Alligator Lizard.

I arrived rather late at 9:45 and stayed until about 3:00. Although missing the "peak" times, the place was teeming with activity. Other species seen include White-tailed Kite, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Lesser Goldfinch, Mourning Dove, Western Kingbird, Western Bluebird, Red-tailed Hawk, Wood Duck (one was high in a tree), Ruby-crowned Kinglet, House Wren, Double-crested Cormorant, California Quail and many other species.

Of course, there were butterflies everywhere. The Pipevine Swallowtail and the Tiger Swallowtail were most frequently seen.

The trails have not yet been mowed and along the Oak and South Trails, the grasses were taller than my knees in places so you may not want to wear shorts. The mosquitoes and bugs are out in force - time to bring out the deet.

Good Birding,
Kathryn Sanderson
Marysville


Gristmill Rec Area / American River Parkway

davedlj1246 <Davedlj1246@...>
 

Fellow birders,

I headed to Gristmill Rec Area this morning and in 3 hours of birding
I tallied 52 species of which the highlights were: a somewhat late
adult BALD EAGLE was soaring fairly high over the American River as
he headed upriver being pursued and harassed by a SWAINSON'S HAWK
(the Bald Eagle was new for me for Gristmill Rec Area and only my 3rd
one for the American River Parkway, the first being an immature on
the ARNHA count at Sacramento Bar on 12/7/85 and the second an adult
on 1/21/96 at Upper Sunrise Park; the Swainson's Hawk is my 5th
sighting on the American River Parkway, the first 2 were in 1976 at
Discovery Park where a pair were occupying a nesting site, the 3rd
was last year here at Gristmill Rec Area in June, the 4th was also
last year in September at Ancil Hoffman Park); a couple of Forster's
Terns were first of the season for me on the American River Parkway;
the Barn Owl was in its nesting cavity in the cottonwood tree; and a
Hermit Thrush was only my second sighting at Gristmill Rec Area.

Good birding

Dave Johnson


Ancil Hoffman Park / American River Parkway

davedlj1246 <Davedlj1246@...>
 

Fellow birders,

Having read Ed Harper's post regarding nesting Swainson's Hawks on
the American River Parkway at Ancil Hoffman Park, I decided that
since I had planned on doing my survey there this Saturday, the
timing of this report was perfect. Now, if only the Swainson's Hawks
had known that I was coming. Alas, I watched the Eucalyptus Tree for
several visits during my stay there this morning into early
afternoon, but no activity. I managed to tally 52 species during my
5 1/2 hours that I spent at Ancil Hoffman Park of which the
highlights were: a pair of American Kestrels were perched along the
high fencing that borders the golf course driving range. I observed
the female fly to one of the nesting boxes that is mounted on the
tall posts that hold the high fencing and peer in the nesting box
without actually entering; observed as many as 2 Ash-throated
Flycatchers, my first of the season and my earliest record of one on
the American River Parkway; Barn Swallow was a new addition for me
for Ancil Hoffman Park having missed it there in 2003; still had a
Ruby-crowned Kinglet in the nature area; a female Common Yellowthroat
was new for me for Ancil Hoffman Park and my first of the season; and
a male Brown-headed Cowbird was in the nature area and was also a new
one for me at Ancil Hoffman Park having missed it there in 2003.

On a more or less non birdy note, I was observing a Spotted Sandpiper
standing on some vegetation near the edge of the American River in
the nature area (much of the area of exposed gravel bars were
submerged due to high releases of water coming from Folsom Dam
creating nesting difficulties for Spotted Sandpipers and Killdeers)
when the Spotted Sandpiper flew toward me and landed about 15 feet
away, very agitated about something. Putting my binoculars down, I
noticed an almost 5 foot Western Rattlesnake moving slowly toward the
edge of the river and approaching the Spotted Sandpiper. The
sandpiper stood its ground, in a vertical posture, and continuously
called. After a few minutes, the rattlesnake reversed direction and
slowly glided over the cobbles into the grasses higher up on the
floodplain.

Good birding

Dave Johnson


Redding Sewer Ponds

boliver@...
 

Greetings
John Coon and I spent about 3 hours at the Redding Sewer Ponds yesterday
morning (sorry I couldn't send this out sooner as my computer was down).
We saw 38 usual suspects and 2 surprises. The best sightings were one
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD and one BAIRD'S SANDPIPER. The Baird's Sandpiper
was in the next to last pond on the river side feeding with a small flock
of LEAST SANDPIPERS. Many will remember that we found a couple of Baird's
Sandpipers there last year.

G..d B.....g,
Bill.


House Wren House-

Ron Melcer <corvid88@...>
 

04/09/04 ~0645

Jack Hayden and I returned early this morning to Putah Sinks(Yolo County) to continue Breeding Bird Surveys. Birds today were consistent with the post from yesterday, however, we failed to turn up the Swamp Sparrow.
We were both suprised and entertained by a House Wren building its nest in the side of a Great-horned Owl nest. The owl was incubating as the wren continuously entered the side of the nest carrying small twigs.
Neither the owl, nor the wren seemed conscious of the others presence.

Good Birding-

Ron Melcer
Sacramento, CA


Ross' geese in Butte Co.

jhsnowden <jhsnowden@...>
 

24 Ross' at the Llano Seco area today, 9 Apr, is a late spring date
for Butte Co. One, an immature, had walking diffculty as it's left
foot is missing.


Re: [CVBirds] Birding/Bird groups in Fresno

Kevin Enns-Rempel <kennsrem@...>
 

Jeff Price wrote:

How is the birding like in the Fresno/Clovis region? Are there any
active bird groups there?

While I won't make the claim that Fresno/Clovis ranks among California's best birding hot spots, there are excellent birding opportunities here. Fresno County has a remarkable diversity of habitat, including some of the tallest mountains in North America, foothills, grasslands, wetlands, riparian and desert. A long one-day birding trip out of Fresno can cover a pretty remarkable assortment of habitat, and therefore a correspondingly remarkable assortment of bird species. We're only a short distance east of the Pacific Flyway, so large numbers of waterfowl are easily accessible, particularly during the winter.

Fresno Audubon Society sponsors regular field trips throughout the area, and has many good birders among its ranks. You can find out more about FAS at http://www.fresnoaudubon.org . Our site includes program and trip schedules, as well as suggestions for good birding locations in the surrounding area.

Let me know if you have any other specific questions.

--
Kevin Enns-Rempel, President
Fresno Audubon Society
Fresno, CA


Cosumnes birds

John and Glennah Trochet <trochetj@...>
 

Dear Birders,
Today at midday along Desmond Road at the Cosumnes River Preserve in southern Sacramento County were waterfowl and shorebirds of possible local interest. In the pond opposite the gate at 6500 Desmond were about 200 western sandpipers, with another 100+/- in the next pond to the east. Two days ago there were only a few of these around. This latter pond had dunlin in the low thousands and a single black-bellied plover about halfway molted into alternate plumage. The next pond to the east had most of the roughly 830 greater white-fronted geese to be seen, plus a male blue winged teal loafing on the western berm of the pond. I saw no whimbrel today.
I started the day in the Tall Forest. Excepting Oregon ash trees, the forest has leafed out early this year. I was stationed in the ash-dominated southeastern part of the woodland before dawn and noticed a small shower of warblers hitting the tree tops there. Of about a dozen birds seen landing, four were Nashville warblers, another a black-throated gray, two each were orange-crowns and Audubon's, and the others melted away before getting glassed. Also in the tree tops was a male western tanager, but I didn't see anything that large drop in. Later, but still early, I saw a Townsend's warbler in trees frequented all last month by one of the wintering birds there and a couple more Nashville warblers close to the ground. And that was about it for warblers this morning. I heard one or two warbling vireos sing from the cottonwoods at the south end of the forest a bit later, and, after hearing one call at dawn, I saw two singing male black-headed grosbeaks as I was leaving the woods. Lots of orioles and ash-throated flycatchers, a few Pacific-slope flycatchers and very few Lincoln's and fox sparrows today.
The season seems to have turned hard toward spring.
Best,
John Trochet


Lower Putah Creek Sinks-

Ron Melcer <corvid88@...>
 

04/08/04 ~1030-1330

Today I conducted breeding bird atlas at the Putah Creek Sinks in Yolo County, east of Mace Blvd. It was quite a productive visit with quite a few confirmed nesting birds including Red-tailed Hawk, Great-horned Owl, House Wren, Tree Swallow, Nuttall's Woodpecker, American Goldfinch...

On a migrant note, there were several singing Bullock's Orioles, 2 Black-headed Grosbeaks, 2 Black-throated Grey Warblers, 1 singing Cassin's Vireo, several Orange-crowned Warblers, and 1 Dusky Flycatcher. At times there were up to 7 Swainson's Hawks in view as they soared, diving and calling along the creek.

I had a very brief encounter with a Swamp Sparrow, I assume this is the same that was previously found by Andy Engilis on 3/24. The bird was associating with 3-4 Dark-eyed Juncos and a few "crowned" sparrows. The group was foraging in the riparian strip amongst low and thick willows and brambles. These birds were very difficult to view, as they skulked through the dense habitat. The rufous wings and contrasting gray on the face of the Swamp Sparrow was striking.

The Fremont Cottonwoods were seeding heavily along this section of the creek, and hundreds of American Goldfinches were taking advantage of this. I could barely hear myself think below the trees bearing the goldfinches.

Good Birding=

Ron Melcer
Sacramento, CA


Ash-throated Flycatchers in Winters-

Ron Melcer <corvid88@...>
 

03/08/04 0630

Today while checking nest boxes on private property along Putah Creek in Winters(Yolo County) 3 Ash-throated Flycatchers were observed, calling and foraging in the willow and walnut trees. These are the first few that I have observed this spring in Yolo County. At this elevation, Tree Swallows are starting to build nests. I also encountered a single singing Fox Sparrow.

Good Birding-

Ron Melcer
Sacramento, CA


Pacific Golden Plovers in Woodland

ed pandolfino
 

Daryl Coldren reported to me that there were 3 Pacific Golden Plovers among
the BB Plovers at the Woodland Water Pollution Control Facility On April 4 and
again yesterday.

Ed Pandolfino

Direction below are from Daryl.

To get there, take 80 to Woodland. Then take road 102 south until you hit E.
Gibson Road. The entrance is the road to the left opposite E. Gibson. Keep
driving until you get to the "Birder Parking" sign. Unfortunately, the ponds
are only open to birders from 7:30 to 3:00 on weekdays. Both times I went the
birds were around the 3rd and 4th pond with a large flock of Black-bellied
Plover and Dunlin.


Swainson's Hawk nesting? American River parkway

Ed Harper
 

Hi folks,

In my many years of birding the American River Parkway I had never
found nesting Swainson's Hawks. On both April 5th and 6th I found a
pair of Swainson's Hawks carrying nesting material to a tall
eucalyptus tree on the bluff overlooking Ancil Hoffman Park. The
tree is the tallest tree on the bluff and the nest location appears
to be about 8 feet below the crown of the tree, down from 12 o'clock.

Today I looked for activity from the pair during a visit between
10:30 and 12:30, but I did not see the birds. If you are visiting
Ancil Hoffman Park, keep an eye out for the birds and any nesting
activity. It would be great if the birds are actually going to
nest.

Thanks,

Ed Harper


Nesting Swainson's Hawk on American River Parkway

Ed Harper
 

Hi folks,

In my many years of birding the American River Parkway I had never found nesting Swainson's Hawks. On both April 5th and 6th I found a pair of Swainson's Hawks carrying nesting material to a tall eucalyptus tree on the bluff overlooking Ancil Hoffman Park. The tree is the tallest tree on the bluff and the nest location appears to be about 8 feet below the crown of the tree, down from 12 o'clock.

Today I looked for activity from the pair during a visit between 10:30 and 12:30, but I did not see the birds. If you are visiting Ancil Hoffman Park, keep an eye out for the birds and any nesting activity. It would be great if the birds are actually going to nest.

Thanks,

Ed Harper