Date   

Re: Burrowing Owl in Tulare County

Craig Swolgaard
 

Lowell & birders-

You probably are aware that Allensworth State Historic Park itself
has had a population of breeding burrowing owls for quite a few
years and is an excellent place to see them in the Central Valley.
In early spring I've counted as many as 12 pairs in the historic
town site and near the campground. There are good opportunities for
photography of these owls during that time. In addition, the park
is very close to Pixley National Wildlife Refuge, which has
excellent birding year round.

Good birding,
Craig Swolgaard
California State Parks
Sacramento, CA


--- In central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com, "Lowell Young"
<mtnfolks@...> wrote:

I have tried to post my Burrowing Owl sighting in Tulare County on
several different groups but for some reason I have not seen it on
any
of them. I don't think that the Owls will have moved on so here
goes
again.

On 10-21-07, I saw two Burrowing Owls in Tulare County at the
intersection of Road 84 and Avenue 36. To get there go to
Allensworth
State Historic Park. Turn onto the road that goes into the Park.
After you have crossed the Rail Road tracks turn left onto road 84
(the
first street) and go South to Ave. 36. The birds were in the NW
corner
of the field located in the SW quadrant of the intersection.

Lowell Young
Mariposa, CA


Placer next ten-reminder

ed pandolfino
 

Just a reminder to send me your predictions in the next two days for the
next species (top ten) to be found in Placer County during the Big Year (2008).
I'll be posting everyone's picks and we'll keep track of whose list has the
most correct guesses (with special consideration for correctly predicting
something really outrageous).

This is your chance to show your prognosticating prowess, gain untold fame
and earn the undying adulation of the birding community.

Again, the current Placer list for this purpose can be accessed either by
going to:
_http://www.sierrafoothillsaudubon.com/Birding/Placer_County_Bird_list/CHECKLIST.htm_
(http://www.sierrafoothillsaudubon.com/Birding/Placer_County_Bird_list/CHECKLIST.htm)

or by going to: _http://www.sierrafoothillsaudubon.com/_
(http://www.sierrafoothillsaudubon.com/) then clicking on 'Birding' and 'Placer County Bird
List'.

Pick species NOT on either the main list or on the list of three additional
species not yet accepted by the CBRC (at the bottom of list).



Ed Pandolfino



************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


Re: [CVBirds] Swans wanted

Bruce Webb <BruWebb@...>
 

At mid-day (10/30/2007), I estimated 125-150 Tundra Swans quite close to and easily visible from Hwy 99 in Sutter County. They were spread out over several of many flooded fields about 11 miles north of the Hwy 99/70 split. This location is just south of where Highway 99 has a brief east-west stretch near the relict town of Tudor. I did not see any swans or geese near the Dingville rice area (also Hwy 99) where they become fairly abundant later in the season.

I quickly scanned but did not see any neck collars on the swans or hundreds of Greater White-fronted Geese.

Later, one Ferruginous Hawk south of Marysville, perched on a fence, along Hwy 65 was good to see.

Bruce Webb
Granite Bay, California
BruWebb @ surewest . net

----- Original Message -----
From: "jhsnowden" <jhsnowden@yahoo.com>
To: <central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2007 4:09 PM
Subject: [CVBirds] Swans wanted


Please post on this site, or email me, any swan sightings in the
Sacramento Valley. Their location and an estimate of swan numbers will
be helpful.

Over 250 tundra swans were neck banded in Alaska this year, as were 355
last year. Most of the bands are blue with a white alpha/numeric code.
I will be searching for banded swans, as a USGS volunteer, this winter,
so any sightings of tundra swans in the Sacramento Valley will be a
good aid for me.

Thanks.

Jim Snowden, Butte Co.




Yahoo! Groups Links




Davis Hooded Mergansers

Charles Walker <cvwalker1066@...>
 

10/30/07

My wife and I saw 7 hooded mergansers, 1 male and 6 female plumage, today about noon on the pond on Rd 103, .2 mi north of 28H, which is the road going by the Yolo County Landfill north of Davis.

We also saw a female hooded merganser in the pond on Hwy 102 south of the Woodland WTP with 8-10 White Pelicans also present.

Good Birding,
Charley Walker
Roseville, CA


Davis Wetlands, Yolo Bypass, Putah Creek

Denise and David Hamilton
 

Hello all,

Made the rounds on Monday, finding the many ducks at the Davis Wastewater Oxidation Ponds as reported by Roger Adamson. We noticed a few Redheads in the mix. (Common or not-so-common?? We rarely see this duck ourselves, so not sure if they are worth reporting or not.) After a brief, but heavy downpour around 10:00 am, we scoped the Stormwater Lagoon where there was MANY shorebirds- quite a few Lesser Yellowlegs to compare along side of the Greaters, and we also saw the Ruff. If anyone still needs to see the bird, be sure to just look for BRIGHT ORANGE LEGS! While scanning the flocks, it was definitely the legs that caught my attention.

Next we headed over to Yolo Bypass. The majority of shorebirds were still in the mud by the hunters' trailer- nothing unusual to report. Ducks were concentrated in one area and most all were sleeping, so did not find anything unusual except for one lone Snow Goose. 6 Sandhill Cranes flew overhead.

At Lake Solano, we did not find the Red-necked Grebe. The Buffleheads were spread out all over now, and still no goldeneyes. We stopped at the fishing access points along Putah creek, but it was really quiet. We stopped under the bridge to check to see if the Dipper was around, and it was there 10 feet in front of us putting on quite the show feeding. Has it been seen lately? We were there sometime in Sept. and did not see it nor have seen any reports of it.

Good birding,
Denise and David Hamilton
Napa
napabirders@att.net


Swans wanted

jhsnowden <jhsnowden@...>
 

Please post on this site, or email me, any swan sightings in the
Sacramento Valley. Their location and an estimate of swan numbers will
be helpful.

Over 250 tundra swans were neck banded in Alaska this year, as were 355
last year. Most of the bands are blue with a white alpha/numeric code.
I will be searching for banded swans, as a USGS volunteer, this winter,
so any sightings of tundra swans in the Sacramento Valley will be a
good aid for me.

Thanks.

Jim Snowden, Butte Co.


Burrowing Owl in Tulare County

Lowell Young <mtnfolks@...>
 

I have tried to post my Burrowing Owl sighting in Tulare County on
several different groups but for some reason I have not seen it on any
of them. I don't think that the Owls will have moved on so here goes
again.

On 10-21-07, I saw two Burrowing Owls in Tulare County at the
intersection of Road 84 and Avenue 36. To get there go to Allensworth
State Historic Park. Turn onto the road that goes into the Park.
After you have crossed the Rail Road tracks turn left onto road 84 (the
first street) and go South to Ave. 36. The birds were in the NW corner
of the field located in the SW quadrant of the intersection.

Lowell Young
Mariposa, CA


Correction about Federal Duck Stamps

maryolo1
 

On re-reading the official information about the Federal Duck Stamp, I
see it allows free entry into Federal Wildlife Areas, not National
Parks. You could use it, for example, at the Sacramento NWR, where a
fee is now charged.
Mary Schiedt
Woodland / Yolo County


Garganey-Gate and Patagonization at YBWA

maryolo1
 

It's not unheard of for birders following up on a sighting to see a
different bird, confounding the sorting out process. Last fall we
posted our banding of an American Tree Sparrow, and that evening
Roger Adamson and Joan Humphrey showed me the digital image on their
camera. It was indeed an American Tree Sparrow, but with a greyer
face. By the next day birders were seeing BOTH sparrows together.
Unless there is a "person-to-person" pass-off of a bird that's
difficult, we'll always have some doubt as to whether the
discussions are all on the same bird.
The Patagonia Picnic Table Effect is delightfully in effect at Yolo
Bypass WA. The more of you out there with discerning eyes and
esoteric knowledge, the more likely we are to find something else to
get excited about.
Now for a "commercial"....if you are out there on a hunt day
(Saturday, Sunday or Wednesday, consider buying a California Duck
stamp ($15.25 cash) and/or a California Upland Game Bird stamp
($7.25 cash) at the Hunter Check-in Station. The duck stamp allows
free entry at state facilities in lieu of a fee, such as at the Auto
Loop at Gray Lodge. The stamps generate money for habitat purchase
or maintenance. Last year two large pumps at YBWA were puchased for
adding water to habitat with "stamp money". Federal Duck stamps can
be purchased at many US Post Offices for $15.00, and 98% of that
goes to habitat AND gets you admission to some federal parks.
Let's join the hunters in supporting what we enjoy.
Mary Schiedt
Woodland / Yolo County


Great -tailed Grackles in numbers

Andy Engilis
 

I realize that Great-tailed Grackles are becoming more numerous and that they are in the Central Valley to stay. We have been tracking their population in the Elk Grove area over the past decade, and their numbers continue to grow. However, recently at evening soccer practices for my youngest , a new picture has emerged as to what is really happening in Southern Sacramento County. I am today reporting that flocks upon flocks are now visible as they fly to their evening roosts along Laguna Creek (west of Hwy 99 and east of Big Horn road). Up to 10-30 birds per flock can be seen, and at one time I counted over 400 birds flying overhead to roost. I would not be surprised if I paid more attention to the flocks and less to the girls playing soccer, that I could double this count.

Good birding Andy Engilis
Elk Grove

=====================================================================
Andrew Engilis, Jr.
Museum Curator
Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology
Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology
One Shields Avenue
University of California, Davis
Davis, CA 95616

Phone: (530) 752-0364
Fax: (530) 752-0364
E-mail: aengilisjr@ucdavis.edu


Re: [CVBirds] Re: (Possible) Garganey at Yolo

Chris Conard
 

Folks,

Scott makes two excellent points. It is certainly possible that he saw a
different bird than the "garganish" bird seen Saturday morning. In the
field, as in the photos, the Saturday morning bird was structurally
identical to nearby Green-winged Teal. I wavered back and forth, but
believe with near certainty that the bird in my photos is a Green-winged
Teal.

On Scott's second point, it has been a good learning experience--both in
preparation for the next "possible" Garganey and for understanding the often
overlooked range of characteristics shown by one of our most common species.

All the best,

Chris Conard
Sacramento


On 10/28/07, shoppeco <shoppe01@earthlink.net> wrote:

Since I was the one who reported the (possible) Garganey on Friday,
10/26, I thought I would interject a few comments on my observations...

There is a slight possibility that the bird that was viewed and
photographed on Saturday is not the same bird I saw on Friday...

I think the best thing out of all of this is that it gets dialog going
on identification. And perhaps birders (incuding myself) will learn a
little more about the finer aspects of bird i.d.


Re: [SPAM] [CVBirds] Re: (Possible) Garganey at Yolo

Todd Easterla <tje6969@...>
 

Birders,

Just returned from a weekend in Monterey.

The bird in Chris Conards photos is definitely not a Gargeny. The bird that I saw a week or so ago was as big if not slightly bigger than the Blue-winged and Cinnamon Teal it was associating with. The bill was not small like a Green-winged would show.The lower check bar was broken and being strongest behind the eye and in front of the eye. The tertials, undrtail coverts, supercilium and throat were ann off white and not too buffy. I never saw the bird in flight even though it flushed.

I still feel it is probably a female gargeny but would like longer looks to see all of the field marks for sure. It is fairly common to see Green-winged Teal with a face pattern that resembles a Gargeny.



Todd Easterla

----- Original Message -----
From: shoppeco
To: central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2007 11:42 AM
Subject: [SPAM] [CVBirds] Re: (Possible) Garganey at Yolo


Since I was the one who reported the (possible) Garganey on Friday,
10/26, I thought I would interject a few comments on my observations.

Regarding Joe Morlan's excellent pointers on important field marks:
while I didn't see the bird in flight, I did see it stretch its wings a
couple of times and, indeed, I did see bold white tertial edgings as
well as gray primaries. And I viewed the bird from just about every
angle, both while it was standing on land and swimming, and at no time
did I note any white on the sides of the tail.

I also noted a dark eye patch that flared above to interrupt a pale
supersilium.

Now for the real controversy. I was feeling relectant to mention this,
but, what the heck. Everybody ready for another "Garganey-gate"?:
There is a slight possibility that the bird that was viewed and
photographed on Saturday is not the same bird I saw on Friday. I know
it doesn't sound very plausible. But when I saw the photos that Chris
Conard posted, my first two thoughts were - "that's not the bird I saw"
and "that bird looks like a Green-winged Teal" (head-stripes
notwithstanding). The shape of the head has that compact, squarish,
Green-winged look, while Friday's bird reminded me more, structurally,
of a Blue-winged. Also, I don't really see the dark eye patch in the
photos.

Then, when I saw the photo of the "real" Garganey in France that
Richard Hall posted, I thought - "that reminds me of the bird I saw".

I realize these are only impressions, and they don't hold much water,
especially without any further documentation. But I thought I would put
the idea out there anyway.

I think the best thing out of all of this is that it gets dialog going
on identification. And perhaps birders (incuding myself) will learn a
little more about the finer aspects of bird i.d.

Scott Hoppe
Newcastle, CA


Re: [CVBirds] (Possible) Garganey at Yolo

Rusty Scalf <rfs_berkeley@...>
 

The bird is a real conundrum. When I got home from viewing this bird I
looked at images of Garganey, and the species does have a relatively
large bill, rather like a Cinnamon Teal; Not small and compact like a
Green-winged Teal. The bird I saw had a bill which seemed about
identical to the surrounding Green-wings.

Twice I saw the bird scratch it's face and the legs and feet were jet
black. Both times the view was in good light. Garganey are supposed to
have dark grey legs and feet, while Green-winged Teal have legs that
vary from light olive gray to light gray brown. Below are a the images
I managed find online showing Green-winged Teal legs. Always light.

Rusty Scalf
Berkeley, CA

http://greennature.com/gallery/duck-pictures/female_green_winged_teal.html

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/38/Green-Winged_Teal.jpg/800px-Green-Winged_Teal.jpg

http://www.stevenround-birdphotography.com/images/green-winged-teal-1.jpg

http://www.greglasley.net/Images/Green-winged-Teal-F5.jpg

http://www.parklandpublishing.com/skphotos/birds/slides/br-1-71_greenwinged_teal.jpg

http://faculty.ucr.edu/~chappell/INW/birds1/greenwing%20teal.jpg

http://www.clarkstanton.com/images/greenwingtealwebpost.jpg

http://leahy.to/birds/green-winged%20teal.html#2


Sutter County 10/28

Steve Glover <countylines@...>
 

Hi all,
Today Frances Oliver and I headed up to Sutter County.
Only a few birds seemed terribly noteworthy:
Along Hwy 99 in the flooded fields across the highway
from Laurel Rd. (the road to Bobelaine) were 4000+
White-faced Ibis and a first-winter Glaucous-winged
Gull, a new bird for each of us and I guess an unusual
find for Sutter.
At the cemetery in the town of Sutter (just south of
the buttes) we had a couple of fly-over Lawrence's
Goldfinches.
Sandhill Cranes were heard on the west side of the
buttes and a small flock of about 30 were on the east
side.
Finally, we had a Peregrine Falcon at the Sutter
Bypass. Neither of us was exactly sure where we were,
however. We took the east levee along the bypass south
from Hwy. 20 for a short distance before coming to a
road which dropped down to the right into the bypass.
We originally supposed this road to be Sutter NWR but
it turns out that is significantly further south.
Looking at a map, it appears this was Franklin Rd. The
bird was on the transmission towers. Although Frances
already had PEFA for the county, it was my 200th
species for the county, at long last.
On the ponds on the west side of Sutter NWR west of
the levee was a Snow Goose which is probably injured
as it summered here.
Good birding,
Steve Glover
Dublin, CA


Yolo Co Lewis' Woodpeckers, another Roadrunner

ADAMSON, Roger H.
 

Davis Wastewater Oxidation Ponds are host to thousands of (mostly) Northern Shovelers and various other expected ducks. Also present were 9 Cackling Geese in the middle pond. I could not refind the Franklin's Gull reported yesterday at the landfill pond.
A search for Mountain Plover near Road 17 and Highway 113 was unsuccessful.
I found Lewis' Woodpeckers (first that I know of for the Yolo calendar year) on County Rd 86 about 0.3 mi north of Rd 4.
We have the return of a popular bird to Rd 16. I spotted a Greater Roadrunner on the south side of Rd 16 about a quarter mile west of I-505, somewhat west of the bee boxes. About three years ago a Roadrunner was see near this spot numerous times, but has not been seen the last couple of years.
I looked for the Chestnut-collared Longspurs reported by Easterla at the corner of 90B and 15B but found only about 30 Horned Larks out with the sheep. [For those of you who know the corner--what we thought was to be a vineyard, southwest of the corner, appears to be an olive orchard.]

Roger Adamson
Davis


RNGR continues at Solano Lake, Yolo Co.

Gil Ewing
 

The Red-necked grebe continued at Solano Lake, not far upstream from the dam, on Sunday. It stuck to the Yolo Co. side of the lake, and kept close company with 7 Hooded mergansers and 4 American wigeon. Other birds not far away included 2 Ring-necked ducks, 1 Western grebe, 106 Bufflehead, and 1 Osprey. I saw no mergansers or goldeneyes yet, all the way up to Lake Berryessa at the dam.

Also, at Vic Fazio refuge, the area that had helf the Sharp-tailed sandpiper earlier in the week had mostly dried up by Saturday. They've put some water back in and it is again attracting thousands of shorebirds, but the ST sandpiper was not seen today, according to Mary Scheidt.

Gil Ewing


Putah Creek10-28

kuschmanfred
 

While most of the local and not so local birders were taking turns scoping and debating a
puzzled female duck (so much seems undisputed) at the Vic Fazio Wildlife Area, I found
nothing but identifiable local birds during my walk along Putah Creek this wonderful Fall
morning. There were the riparian zone raptors: Red-shouldered, Red-tailed, Sharp-
Shinned, and Cooper's Hawks, and a Great Horned Owl and 2 American Kestrels, and on
the smaller scale, the scene was dominated by numerous Yellow-Rumped Warblers and
Ruby-crowned Kinglets, and the usual flocks of Bushtits. But traveling with them I still
observed 2-4 Black-throated Gray, 2 Orange-crowned, and most surprisingly 1 late Yellow
Warbler. Besides the common (around here) woodpeckers, Nuttall's, Downy, and Northern
Flicker I have been observing a Red-breasted Sapsucker during last week, a bird that has
also shown up in the posts of others recently. White-breasted Nuthatches continue to be
present, as are Black Phoebe, Belted Kingfisher, Great Blue Heron, and as yet unidentified
sparrows that dart in and out of the sedges along the water, never remaining visible long
enough to be reviewed. The many Wood Ducks that had recently congregated on the
secluded pond-like section of the creek are suddenly gone. I suspect that the opening of
the waterfowl hunting season may have something to do with their disappearance
although nobody around here hunts them on the creek. This is the reverse of what I
observe at the beginning of dove season on Sptember 1 when gun fire erupts in the
orchards south of my place and large numbers of suddenly skittish doves seek refuge in
the woodland along the creek.
In my garden, flocks of White-Crowned and Golden Crowned Sparrows and a few Lincoln's
Sparrows have settled in for the winter. The Say's Phoebe returns to its sleeping spot
under the porch roof every night, House Finches, superabundant during the spring and
summer, persist in reduced numbers, Western Bluebirds hunt for insects in the native
grasses, and Nuttall's Woodpeckers occupy their nestboxes at night. After a lull marked by
the departure of Rufous and Black-chinned Hummingbirds, hummer activity has picked
up dramatically. Numerous Anna's Hummingbirds have converged on the garden,
attracted by the many flowering salvias and expansive patches of California fuchias, all at
their peak now, and their abundance can be measured by the consumption of sugar water
at my feeder: a quart will now barely last 2 days.
"And in the mammal department," the local coyotes have been celebrating the full moon
during the past few nights with their exuberant and haunting song, underscoring the
beauty of this season in the central valley.


Manfred Kusch--
Davis/Winters


Re: (Possible) Garganey at Yolo

shoppeco <shoppe01@...>
 

Since I was the one who reported the (possible) Garganey on Friday,
10/26, I thought I would interject a few comments on my observations.

Regarding Joe Morlan's excellent pointers on important field marks:
while I didn't see the bird in flight, I did see it stretch its wings a
couple of times and, indeed, I did see bold white tertial edgings as
well as gray primaries. And I viewed the bird from just about every
angle, both while it was standing on land and swimming, and at no time
did I note any white on the sides of the tail.

I also noted a dark eye patch that flared above to interrupt a pale
supersilium.

Now for the real controversy. I was feeling relectant to mention this,
but, what the heck. Everybody ready for another "Garganey-gate"?:
There is a slight possibility that the bird that was viewed and
photographed on Saturday is not the same bird I saw on Friday. I know
it doesn't sound very plausible. But when I saw the photos that Chris
Conard posted, my first two thoughts were - "that's not the bird I saw"
and "that bird looks like a Green-winged Teal" (head-stripes
notwithstanding). The shape of the head has that compact, squarish,
Green-winged look, while Friday's bird reminded me more, structurally,
of a Blue-winged. Also, I don't really see the dark eye patch in the
photos.

Then, when I saw the photo of the "real" Garganey in France that
Richard Hall posted, I thought - "that reminds me of the bird I saw".

I realize these are only impressions, and they don't hold much water,
especially without any further documentation. But I thought I would put
the idea out there anyway.

I think the best thing out of all of this is that it gets dialog going
on identification. And perhaps birders (incuding myself) will learn a
little more about the finer aspects of bird i.d.

Scott Hoppe
Newcastle, CA


Re: [CVBirds] Re: (Possible) Garganey continues at Yolo Wildlife Area

Joe Morlan
 

Another controversial teal, May 2004, from Humboldt County created quite a
stir at the time. The bird was eventually identified as a Green-winged
Teal, possibly of the Eurasian race which also has white along the leading
edge of the green speculum. There was also a dispute about whether this
was the correct bird. Some observers insisting that there was also a
"real" Garganey. Some locals called the controversy "Garganey-Gate."

Another possible Garganey was reported earlier this the month at the
Helendale Sewage Ponds, near Silver Lakes, but was retracted by the
observer the same day after discussion with Jon Dunn. Two important
features to look for on female Garganey are bold white edgings to the
tertials and gray primaries in flight. Green-winged Teal almost invariably
shows white along the sides of the tail and lateral undertail coverts. Both
species may show double facial stripes.

A helpful article is:

Jackson, G. D. 1992. Field Identification of teal in North America:
Female-like plumages. Part II: Garganey and Baikal Teal. Birding
24:214-223.

On Sun, 28 Oct 2007 03:05:56 -0000, "Matt Brady" <podoces@yahoo.com> wrote:

Hi CV Birders. I was one of the co-finders of the 2003 Baker STP
"Garganey". That bird was NOT accepted by the CBRC, and I have since
reidentified it as a probable Common Teal, the Eurasian counterpart to
our Green-winged Teals. Please use discretion when comparing the
current Yolo bird to that one.

Matt Brady
Mendocino County


--- In central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Conard"
<conardc@...> wrote:

Folks,

This morning (10/27/07) a little before 1030, Kimya Lambert and I
found a
large group of birders. They were scoping the putative female-type
Garganey
from what I believe is Lot C (the lot on your right as you are heading S
along the loop portion of the auto tour).

I have never seen a Garganey [before], so for what it is worth, I
like the
pattern on the face. The bill appeared a little smaller than I
would like.
The bill was all dark. At times green showed in the speculum (wing
folded)--I didn't get good views of the bird flapping as seen by
others. I
like the white edging to the tertials.

The bird was farther away than I would have liked, but a few of my
digiscopes might be useful:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/conardc/

As additional food for thought, a possible Garganey was photographed
at the
Baker Sewage Ponds in 2003. Photo here:
http://fog.ccsf.cc.ca.us/~jmorlan/garg.htm<http://fog.ccsf.cc.ca.us/%7Ejmorlan/garg.htm>

Thoughts welcome.

While we were there, nobody saw a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper. One Pectoral
Sandpiper was found by another birder on the return leg of the loop ~150
yards S of Lot B.

Chris Conard
Sacramento



--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA 94044 jmorlan (at) ccsf.edu
Fall Birding Classes start Sept 5 http://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/
California Bird Records Committee http://www.wfo-cbrc.org/cbrc/


poss Garganey

Richard Hall
 

Hi CVbirders,

I've been following the recent bonanza of good Yolo County birds with
interest (and a little bit of jealousy). Regarding Chris Conard's photos of
the poss. Garganey, I liked the head pattern on one side of the face, but it
looked less convincing on the other side and when the bird was out of direct
sunlight. I also feel that the bill on this bird is too small. For
comparison, here's a photo of a 'real' female Garganey taken in France this
year:
http://www.surfbirds.com/blogs/rjhall/garganey_pair.html

... and here are several shots of a bird I saw at North Davis pond in 2005,
which after an initial scare I decided was a strongly-marked female
Green-winged Teal.
http://www.surfbirds.com/blogs/rjhall/archives/2004/08/davis_north_pond.html

It's not unusual for ducks to display variants in the face pattern; for
example female Tufted Ducks fairly frequently show a white 'face'
reminiscent of female Greater Scaup.

Here's hoping your next candidate Garganey is an adult male!
Cheers
Richard Hall

Orsay, France

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