Date   

Re: Hybrid waterfowl Butte County 1/11/22

tgmiko@gmail.com
 

Andy and Liam,
Before I say anything, let me preface it by saying that I'm not a professional biologist, I'm only a nuclear inspector. Looking at one of Liam's photos on a 18-inch computer screen one of the cackling geese is facing towards me but looking past my right shoulder. That bird, in the middle of the photograph, has a white patch that is not the same shape as that of cackling or Canada geese that I have looked at before. I have seen thousands of cackling geese in Europe. The bird in the middle of the photo also has a white patch on the forehead. I don't know what that means, but I can see why somebody would state that this bird is a hybrid, specifically that it has barnacle goose genes.

Thomas Geza Miko
Claremont, LA County
909.241.3300
"Lasciate ogni speranza o voi che entrate."--Dante Alighieri


On Wed, Jan 12, 2022, 11:56 AM Andy Engilis via groups.io <aengilisjr=ucdavis.edu@groups.io> wrote:

The bird you are calling a hybrid Cackler x Barnacle I am not seeing in your photo.  All birds in the photo fall within the character trait range of the minima group in my opinion.

 

Andy

 

Andrew Engilis, Jr.

Curator

Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology

Dept of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology

One Shield Avenue

University of California

Davis, CA 95616

USA

 

Office Phone:  530-752-0364

Cell: 530-902-1881

FAX: 530-752-4154

E-mail:  aengilisjr@...

Website:  http://mwfb.ucdavis.edu

 

From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Liam Huber via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2022 10:53 PM
To: centralvalleybirds@groups.io
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] Hybrid waterfowl Butte County 1/11/22

 

Hey folks,

 

I spent a few hours today searching for new waterfowl hybrids at Llano Seco in Butte County. This tends to be one of the better spots in the valley for hybrids, but I have never had a day anywhere that was this fruitful! About an hour of wigeon scanning yielded SIX American x Eurasian Wigeon males!! This is an incredible count anywhere in the north valley... most I've ever had in an entire day was 3! A textbook male Mallard x Northern Pintail was a fun addition, showing a full green head, pale gray bill, and classic pintail body. The real prize however, among a large flock of Cackling Geese, was a probable Cackling x Barnacle Goose!!! This would be the 2nd record for western North America (on eBird)! Details and photos are in this checklist:

 

 

 

 


--
Liam Huber

Butte Co.


Re: Hybrid waterfowl Butte County 1/11/22

Andy Engilis
 

The bird you are calling a hybrid Cackler x Barnacle I am not seeing in your photo.  All birds in the photo fall within the character trait range of the minima group in my opinion.

 

Andy

 

Andrew Engilis, Jr.

Curator

Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology

Dept of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology

One Shield Avenue

University of California

Davis, CA 95616

USA

 

Office Phone:  530-752-0364

Cell: 530-902-1881

FAX: 530-752-4154

E-mail:  aengilisjr@...

Website:  http://mwfb.ucdavis.edu

 

From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Liam Huber via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2022 10:53 PM
To: centralvalleybirds@groups.io
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] Hybrid waterfowl Butte County 1/11/22

 

Hey folks,

 

I spent a few hours today searching for new waterfowl hybrids at Llano Seco in Butte County. This tends to be one of the better spots in the valley for hybrids, but I have never had a day anywhere that was this fruitful! About an hour of wigeon scanning yielded SIX American x Eurasian Wigeon males!! This is an incredible count anywhere in the north valley... most I've ever had in an entire day was 3! A textbook male Mallard x Northern Pintail was a fun addition, showing a full green head, pale gray bill, and classic pintail body. The real prize however, among a large flock of Cackling Geese, was a probable Cackling x Barnacle Goose!!! This would be the 2nd record for western North America (on eBird)! Details and photos are in this checklist:

 

 

 

 


--
Liam Huber

Butte Co.


Hybrid waterfowl Butte County 1/11/22

Liam Huber
 

Hey folks,

I spent a few hours today searching for new waterfowl hybrids at Llano Seco in Butte County. This tends to be one of the better spots in the valley for hybrids, but I have never had a day anywhere that was this fruitful! About an hour of wigeon scanning yielded SIX American x Eurasian Wigeon males!! This is an incredible count anywhere in the north valley... most I've ever had in an entire day was 3! A textbook male Mallard x Northern Pintail was a fun addition, showing a full green head, pale gray bill, and classic pintail body. The real prize however, among a large flock of Cackling Geese, was a probable Cackling x Barnacle Goose!!! This would be the 2nd record for western North America (on eBird)! Details and photos are in this checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S100572762





--
Liam Huber
Butte Co.


Re: Glenn & Colusa Co. 1.10.21

Denise and David Hamilton
 



---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Denise Hamilton <napabirders@...>
Date: Mon, Jan 10, 2022 at 9:09 PM
Subject: Glenn & Colusa Co. 1.10.21
To: Central Valley Birds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>

NOT SURE HOW I SENT THIS before finishing it!

Hi all,

We went on our annual trip over to Sacramento & Colusa NWRs.  First drove out to the Maxwell Cemetery to check on the male Vermillion Flycatcher from past years, since we've seen no reports.  Did not see him!

At Sacramento NWR in a slough at the beginning of the route, saw 3 racoons along with an AMERICAN BITTERN. The most plentiful pond was the one to the right of the viewing platform on the first stretch of the auto route. Scope is definitely helpful!   WILSON'S SNIPE, lots of LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS, CINNAMON TEAL, a few CANVASBACK,  a male EURASIAN WIGEON among all the geese and other ducks. Quite a few BALD EAGLES of various ages.  Saw a LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE with a mouse almost as big as it is (a first for us.)  Lots of SNOW & GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE, & some ROSS'S GEESE were all around.

At Colusa NWR we saw one lone BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON in the spot where the hundreds of them used to roost.

Then, thanks to eBird reports posted by Cameron Tescher and Frank Fabbro, we headed down to Tule Rd. (outside Arbuckle) in the late afternoon.  Saw our only YELLOW-BILLED MAGPIE of the day, and  around 4:15 pm, a hunting SHORT-EARED OWL appeared.  Then we continued on to Poundstone Rd. South.  There we had for the day:  TUNDRA SWANS, 20+ SANDHILL CRANES & at least 3 more SHORT-EARED OWLS.  They were out hunting and perching while the sun was still up.  It was the best views of them we've had in years!  Heading back to Arbuckle when it was getting dark, we stopped at the row of trees on Tule Rd at the small bridge over a creek where we heard a pair of GREAT HORNED OWLS hooting.  It was a great way to end the day.

Happy 2022 birding!
Denise and David Hamilton
Napa


Glenn & Colusa Co. 1.10.21

Denise and David Hamilton
 

Hi all,

We went on our annual trip over to Sacramento & Colusa NWRs.  First drove out to the Maxwell Cemetery to check on the male Vermillion Flycatcher from past years, since we've seen no reports.  Did not see him!

Most plentiful pond at Sacramento NWR was the one to the right of the viewing platform on the first stretch of the auto route. Scope is definitely helpful!   


Lake Yosemite CBC Results

Nathan Parmeter
 

Hello all Central Valley Birders,

The Lake Yosemite/Merced CBC was held on January 4, 2022 under mostly-clear skies with mild temperatures. Nevertheless, 12 participants saw a total of 101 species across the count circle in Merced and Mariposa counties. Count day highlights included a Golden Eagle at Henderson Park along the Merced River, a Short-eared Owl and 3 Burrowing owls at the UC Merced Vernal Pools and Grassland Reserve, 2 Lewis's Woodpeckers below the Lake McSwain dam, a male Vermilion Flycatcher that has frequented Lake Yosemite lately, and a Slate-Colored Junco and 2 Chipping Sparrows hanging out in a giant flock of Oregon Juncos at Henderson Park. Please let me know if you might be interested in participating in a future iteration of the Lake Yosemite CBC. 

Nathan Parmeter
Fresno, CA


possible Rough-legged Hawk on Rt. 128, Yolo County, 1/8/21

L Markoff
 

Sorry I didn’t have time to post this until now.  Yesterday afternoon about 3:30, Saturday, 1/8, I was traveling east on 128 near the Putah Creek fishing access in Yolo County.  I saw what I think was a light morph female/immature Rough-legged Hawk sitting on the top of a power pole.  I couldn’t stop because my husband and I were hurrying to pick up our son in Folsom before dark. 

 

It was one of those moments when you are already past a bird and by the time that it registers as to what it was that you saw, you are already half a mile down the road.  If I was by myself I would have made a quick u-turn and zipped back there to double check, but my non-birder husband wouldn’t be impressed enough to do so, so I didn’t even ask. 

 

The bird had a light head and chest with a dark belly.  It has been a while since I saw Rough-legged Hawk in person, think it was 2015 in Joseph, Oregon when I went there on a chase for a Gyrfalcon.  But I saw a bunch there and they sort of stuck in my brain, and yesterday’s bird looked like the Joseph Rough-legged Hawks to me. 

 

Just thought that I would mention it, fwiw.  Sorry it took so long to do so.

 

Lori Markoff

Citrus Heights


Cosumnes birds this weekend

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

Yesterday I pinch hit for Jim Rowoth, who is unable to do his River Walk bird survey this month.  In his stead I turned up 85 species on a route that includes the public trails and the TNC Barn ponds.  Highlights included five blue morph snow geese scattered among some 1650 of that species, an Eurasian green-winged teal in front of the distant house at 7000 Desmond Road, and four Lewis's woodpeckers in the savanna north of 'the Point," well to the east of the public trail.  

After the survey and not on the preserve but of some interest, the eastern phoebe finally deigned to come out for observation at its previous, continuing location at the south end of Tyler Island Road after about 45 minutes MIA.

Today I visited a private ranch in southeastern Sacramento County on which the preserve, the former owner, now holds a conservation easement.  I was accompanied by Chris Conard.  According to Chris, we walked some 15.5 miles.  We had several nice finds:
band-tailed pigeon-  35
bald eagle-  2 (at least)
golden eagle-  2
ferruginous hawk-  6
rough-legged hawk-  2
Lewis's woodpecker-  84
prairie falcon-  1
loggerhead shrike-  3
mountain bluebird-  3 (all males)
white-throated sparrow-  1 (off the top of my head, I think Chris's find was a first for the ranch)
rufous-crowned sparrow-  2
tricolored blackbird-  45

Also today, two TNC employees refound the hooded warbler in Orr Forest.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


Sacramento County eBird Hotspots for Stakeouts and this Listserve

Chris Conard
 

Hi folks,

A lot of people have been visiting rarely-birded Delta portions of Sacramento County for the Eastern Phoebe on Tyler Island and the Neotropic Cormorant just off Brannan Island Rd. There are now eBird hotspots for each location. For data retrieval it would help to have the lists combined into the hotspots rather than numerous, sometimes overlapping and, therefore, unreachable dots. If your list is at a nearby hotspot, such as the one for Tyler Island, that's great, but if you have a single list at the exact Eastern Phoebe location, I hope you will consider using the hotspot for future visits and even editing the location of your past lists to the new hotspot.

To add a little bird reporting to this message, Kimya and I had a great experience with the cormorant on January 1st. The photos are so-so, but it was quite active (preening, flying, even catching a fish) while we were there. We were told it had been absent for the previous two and a half hours:  https://ebird.org/checklist/S99880852

Please also consider occasionally reporting to this listserve. It has a great history and useful, searchable archive going back over 20 years. There has been a trend toward county-specific reporting through other media, or only reporting through eBird, but this list serves a function as a regional reporting site on what's happening throughout the Valley, and also allows for more narrative description than are found in most eBird reports. 

BTW, the aforementioned Neotropic Cormorant off Brannan Island Rd and the Eastern Phoebe at the southern tip of Tyler Island continue to be reported, as does the Long-tailed Duck at the Nimbus Hatchery, mostly present under the Hazel Ave Bridge (where extraordinary breath holding ability can make it a challenge to find on the water's surface).

Thanks a lot,

Chris Conard
Sacramento


Six Anatidae family taxa (ducks, geese, swans) @ Colusa National Wildlife Refuge

Daniel Edelstein
 

Sorry for the tardy post from Monday, 1/3/22….(but “io” listserv discombobulations/technical difficulties).

Highlights via a private tour I led for two Australian birders at the Colusa National Wildlife Refuge “auto tour” 
area including the platform by the open water region — PHOTOS at my eBird checklist: 


Six Anatidae family members:

- SNOW GOOSE

- ROSS’S GOOSE

- CANADA GOOSE

- GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE

- ALEUTIAN CACKLING GOOSE (Branta hutchinsii leucopareia)

- CACKLING CACKLING GOOSE (Branta hutchinsii minima)

Regards, 

Daniel Edelstein

Novato, CA (SF Bay Area)


Putah Creek Christmas Bird Count 2021 Summary

Bart Wickel
 

The 51st Putah Creek Christmas Bird Count was held on December 19, 2021. Area leaders sought to cover all usual routes with teams of experienced birders accompanied by new or less experienced birders. While the count was open to the public we adhered to a modified protocol due to covid recommendations, which limited this resulted in lower participation than in pre-covid years with 73 participants compared to the usual average of 85.

The count was successful in covering all the usual routes with a combined 187 party hours during which we collectively traveled 110 miles on foot and 209 miles by car. Conditions were colder than usual and foggy, especially in the early hours of the day.

A new eBird feature that was introduced this year was the trip-report function. This allows the creation of a summary of all lists for a particular day, which turned out to be particularly helpful for a Christmas Bird Count. While not all of the observations this year were covered, we managed to get close to the count totals for most species. The day report can be found at: https://ebird.org/tripreport/26130

During this year’s count we observed 138 species which is typical for this count circle. We observed unusually high numbers of waterfowl and gulls, likely due to these foggy conditions. In contrast to previous years, owl-counts were low.

Among water fowl record high-counts were observed for: Snow Goose (826), Greater White-fronted Goose (693), Green-winged Teal (449), Common Merganser (357), Lesser Scaup (25), and a first observation of a mute Swan on Putah Creek.

Among gulls we observed record high counts for: California Gull (316), Herring Gull (54) as well as a first observation of two Glaucous-winged Gulls in two distinct locations.

Multi-year trends of increasing numbers of insectivores and fructivores, correlated with warmer winters and a lack of overnight freezes, seem to persist with continued high counts for Western Bluebird, Anna’s Hummingbird, White-breasted Nuthatch, Sora and Virginia Rail.

A record number of Common Raven (679) was also observed. Along Putah Creek at the fishing accesses a record number of 5 Pacific Wrens were counted.

The impacts of the LNU Lightning Complex megafire in August 2020, which burned approximately 60% of the count circle, are clearly marked by sustained low numbers of American Robin, Wild Turkey, Wrentits, Canyon Wrens and an all-out absence of Pileated Woodpeckers.

Thanks to all the area leaders for assembling thorough coverage under pandemic conditions! We hope next year we can invite all birders and birders-to-be and finish the day with the traditional potluck.

Bart Wickel
Davis, CA


count week explorations at Cosumnes

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

I spent the last two days visiting portions of the Rio Cosumnes CBC circle in search of count week birds.  Yesterday I went to the Denier and Shaw Forest parcels north of Twin Cities Road and today I visited Orr Ranch.  These are all parcels of limited access.  At Denier/Shaw I found a blue-gray gnatcatcher and heard a fly-over pine siskin.  I also had a sapsucker that called at long intervals over a span of roughly 10-15 minutes, but I could not find it overhead.  Today I had three Lewis's woodpeckers, two (more) white-throated sparrows and in very quick succession the continuing hooded warbler (certainly the same bird first found in November) and a roost of at least eight long-eared owls.  I twice heard something very like the mewing call of a green-tailed towhee but failed to get visual confirmation.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


Neotropic Cormorant continues

Mike Curry
 

Thursday 6 January, 2022

Dear fellow birders,

The Neotropic Cormorant showed up at the dilapidated dredge off West Brannan Island Road this morning at 10 o’clock. I posted the sighting on Ebird for those who want to get more exact location info.

Good birding!
Mike Curry
Willits, CA


Lake Solano and Park

rosita94598
 

Mount Diablo Audubon held a field trip to Putah Creek Wednesday Jan. 5.  We stayed on the Solano County side of the creek, starting toward the lower dam off Putah Creek Road and walking through both the day-use and campground sides of the park.

We had plenty of Buffleheads, no doubt about that.  Also quite a few Hooded Mergansers and Common Goldeneyes.  It took a long time, but we finally found a pair of Wood Ducks under some branches on the north side of the creek.

Phainopeplas were in the day-use area of the park, but our only Lewis's Woodpeckers were across the creek.  Sixty-five species were seen by the group.

Most of the group headed home following the completion of our checklist, but a few of us drove to the west bridge and Monticello Dam.  From the bridge toward the dam there were at least twenty female Common Goldeneyes without a male in sight.  I was thinking maybe a Ladies Day Out?  We saw no Dipper up or downstream.

On my return from the dam, I pulled off immediately past the RV park where there is a smallish red structure.  Lots of Goldeneyes in the water there, including three male and one female Barrow's Goldeneys.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: red-naped sapsucker

Andy Engilis
 

The sapsucker was present today at 4pm in the Cork Oak marked as Michael states,  a blue face mask is tied to sticks at tree base.  It looked good for Red-naped,  the black bib is not well formed but the facial lines are sharp.  It appeared to me to be a female.  The views were fleating as the bird was wary and stayed high in the tree.

Andy Engilis
Elk Grove

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
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From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> on behalf of Michael Perrone via groups.io <michaelperrone10@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 4, 2022 3:59:31 PM
To: Central Valley Birds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] red-naped sapsucker
 
An apparent red-naped sapsucker male was a bit north of Courtland, but in Yolo County, yesterday, January 3, along Waukeena Road (also called Road 145) a few hundred yards east of its junction with North Courtland Road (also called Road 157), in live oaks just past the first driveway east of the road junction.  The driveway is marked by two white poles, and the tree the bird was in most of the time is marked by crossed sticks and a small colored flag at the base of its trunk.  This is a paved levee road with very little vehicular traffic.  The sapsucker stayed high in the trees and moved around a lot, and so was hard to see well.

  It seemed faithful to the spot.  We found it as we walked north along Waukeena at about 9 AM, saw it again an hour or so later as we returned south, and again ten minutes later when we returned by car and got out to look for it.  Twice the bird flew across the slough to trees on the other side--and we feared it was gone for good--but each time it returned.

Michael Perrone
Davis


red-naped sapsucker

Michael Perrone
 

An apparent red-naped sapsucker male was a bit north of Courtland, but in Yolo County, yesterday, January 3, along Waukeena Road (also called Road 145) a few hundred yards east of its junction with North Courtland Road (also called Road 157), in live oaks just past the first driveway east of the road junction.  The driveway is marked by two white poles, and the tree the bird was in most of the time is marked by crossed sticks and a small colored flag at the base of its trunk.  This is a paved levee road with very little vehicular traffic.  The sapsucker stayed high in the trees and moved around a lot, and so was hard to see well.

  It seemed faithful to the spot.  We found it as we walked north along Waukeena at about 9 AM, saw it again an hour or so later as we returned south, and again ten minutes later when we returned by car and got out to look for it.  Twice the bird flew across the slough to trees on the other side--and we feared it was gone for good--but each time it returned.

Michael Perrone
Davis


recent Sacramento area birds

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

I have helped out on CBCs the last two days, so I moved up my monthly Lost Slough bird survey at the Cosumnes River Preserve to New Years Day.  This route was instituted by Gary and Jeri Langham in the early 1990s and is often dead in summer (but it only takes one!) and great in winter.  It was pretty good on Saturday.  The loop was still slightly flooded in the south and west, so I couldn't quite get everywhere I usually go.  The most striking bird was a spotted towhee with bright yellow irides.  Waterfowl were pretty good, with a few blue-winged teal visible from the low deck opposite the Visitor Center, two drake Eurasian wigeons not visible from the public trails, one drake Eurasian green-winged teal, and one drake redhead.  The teal and redhead were in a pond most of which is visible looking southwest from near the end of the boardwalk trail.

On Sunday I covered a portion of the Folsom CBC circle east of Folsom Lake in El Dorado County.  I parked at the Sweetwater Creek crossing on Salmon Falls Road and worked public land downstream and private property above the road.  The latter has very nice chaparral slopes that I'm sometimes able to pull good birds from and a stretch of creek that hosts an American dipper or two most years.  No dipper this year, but I did get California thrasher, Lawrence's goldfinch and Bell's sparrow from the chamise and Pacific wren and rufous-crowned sparrow from near the creek.  A hairy woodpecker and a slate-colored fox sparrow were also pretty good for the count.  Perhaps the most interesting thing was a mixed flock before sunrise (it was really cold then, 26 degrees F. or colder) working the lakeside willows whose bases are now submerged by the rising lake water.  Almost all of the birds were within inches of the water surface, where it was no doubt warmest, 20-100 feet from shore.  The flock included oak titmouse, ruby-crowned kinglet, house wren, hermit thrush, Oregon junco, white-crowned sparrow, golden-crowned sparrow, Savannah sparrow (my only one), song sparrow, Lincoln's sparrow, and myrtle and Audubon's warblers!

Yesterday I participated in the Rio Cosumnes CBC, unsurprisingly covering the area behind the Farm Center gate.  Flooding that recently covered some three-quarters of the area receded astonishingly in the preceding 48 hours.  I was still unable to wade to the Accidental Forest and there was too much water running over the berm on Wood Duck Slough to cross, but knee boots were enough to get to everywhere else that I usually visit, and more.  The bigger surprise was that there were birds already back in the Tall Forest.  It has been my previous experience that once the river has been flowing through that woodland there is a lag of several days to perhaps two weeks before forest bird variety and numbers recover.  And it seemed to be one of those rare days when I made all the right choices in turns this way or that, because I ran into many bushtit flocks accompanied by good birds.  I can't neglect to say that the areas still covered by floodwaters had some good birds, too.  The long day's highlights included a (the same?) hybrid male blue-winged teal x northern shoveler, 29 lesser scaup (small potatoes compared to 25 years ago but a good number anymore), a white-throated swift, a pleasant fly-in of hundreds of sandhill cranes after sunset, a Harlan's red-tailed hawk, an intergrade northern flicker, a merlin that deviated from its flight path to take a shot at a perched red-tailed hawk before resuming course, a peregrine falcon flashing over legions of green-winged teal, a loggerhead shrike, a yellow-billed magpie, a golden-crowned kinglet, two tricolored blackbirds and seven wood warbler taxa (!): orange-crowned warbler, common yellowthroat, myrtle warbler, Audubon's warbler, black-throated gray warbler, Townsend's warbler and, completely unexpected, a Nashville warbler!

Good birding to all in this New Year.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


Mountain Plovers

Roger Dunstan
 

This afternoon I saw a flock of Mountain Plovers in a field off of Woodbridge road.  This is the link to my checklist and it has details on the location.







CV Counties 2021 Big Year Summary

Liam Huber
 
Edited

Hi folks,
 
I've had requests from a few friends to post a summary of my 2021 big year, so hopefully here & countybirders are acceptable places for that. 
 
I attempted to break big year records for 7 counties this year: Butte, Tehama, Plumas, Yuba, Glenn, Colusa & Sutter. In hindsight, cutting this down to about 3 or 4 would have optimal, but I had a ton of fun regardless of the results! Had to drop a few counties as the second half wore on to make it all work. Fire also had a major impact in Sierra counties for a few months. Drove just under 55,000 miles, hiked about 1,300. 
 
 
I'll just include the numbers along with best birds and biggest misses. Mute Swan does not count towards these numbers. *denotes 1st county record find. 
 
Tehama
Previous Record: 245 (Michele Swartout) *249 now, set by Michele in 2021
My total: 240
-Best Birds: Surf Scoter, *Sabine's Gull, *Emperor Goose, *Lesser black backed Gull, Sanderling, Pine Grosbeak, Costa's Hummingbird, Red-necked Grebe
-Biggest Misses: White-tailed Kite, Eurasian Wigeon, Greater Roadrunner, Canada Jay, Common Nighthawk, Black-bellied Plover, Hooded Oriole, American Bittern, American Avocet
 
Glenn
Previous Record: 231 (Logan Kahle)
My total: 235
-Best birds: *Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, *Sabine's Gull, *Lesser black backed Gull, Red-breasted Merganser, Red-necked Grebe, Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Trumpeter Swan, Baird's Sandpiper, Allen's Hummingbird, Sanderling
-Biggest Misses: White-tailed Kite, Northern Pygmy Owl, Greater Roadrunner, Green-tailed Towhee, Vesper Sparrow, Swainson's Thrush
 
Colusa
Previous Record: 230 (Jim Holmes)
My total: 225
-Best birds: *Sabine's Gull, Surf Scoter, Trumpeter Swan, Red-breasted Merganser, Semipalmated Sandpiper
-Biggest Misses: Burrowing Owl, Greater Roadrunner, Common Loon, Hammond's Flycatcher, Blue Grosbeak, Forster's Tern, Hooded Oriole

Sutter
Previous Record: 210 (Jim Laughlin)
My total: 204
-Best birds: Brant, Common Loon, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Trumpeter Swan, Canyon Wren, Iceland Gull, Baird's Sandpiper
-Biggest Misses: Varied Thrush, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Burrowing Owl, Glossy Ibis (i was out of state), Hooded Oriole, Horned Grebe

Butte
Previous Record: 257 (Liam Huber)
My total: 265
-Best birds: Barred Owl, Surf Scoter, Pine Grosbeak, *Lesser black backed Gull, *Western Gull, Common Tern, Sanderling, Snowy Plover, Sage Thrasher, Purple Martin, Franklin's Gull, Pacific Loon, Red-necked Grebe, Costa's Hummingbird, Northern Shrike, Long-eared Owl, Red-breasted Merganser
-Biggest misses: Gray Flycatcher, Canada Jay, Pygmy Nuthatch, Clark's Nutcracker

Plumas
Previous Record: 251 (A&S Edwards)
My total: 216 (dropped in Oct)
-Best birds: Cordilleran Flycatcher, Black throated Sparrow, Least Flycatcher, Brambling, Common Redpoll, Snowy Plover, Sanderling, Baird's Sandpiper, Marbled Godwit, Lesser black backed Gull, Pacific Loon
-Biggest misses: Ross' Goose, Black-bellied Plover, Semipalmated Plover, Red-necked Phalarope, Golden Eagle, Great Horned Owl, Black-backed Woodpecker, Clark's Nutcracker, Varied Thrush
 
Yuba
Previous Record: 241 (Asher Perla)
My total: 225
-Best Birds: Blue-winged Teal, Marbled Godwit, Neotropic Cormorant, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Brewer's Sparrow, Costa's Hummingbird 
-Biggest misses: Red Crossbill, Burrowing Owl, Rough-legged Hawk, Redhead, Greater Scaup, Black Tern, Mountain Bluebird, White-throated Sparrow
 
Wishing everyone happy holidays and a 2022 full of amazing birds!

--
Liam Huber
Butte Co.


Re: SAC Neotropic Cormorant along Brannan Island Rd

Chris Conard
 

The bird continues on the wire on the dredge where Brannan Island Rd turns north from the San Joaquin River. Luckily for us, it flew in as we drove up at 3pm after it was elsewhere for a couple of hours. It preened, flew down, caught a fish, and flew back to the dredge. Back on the wires among the Double-cresteds.

Chris Conard
Sacramento
--please excuse this brief message sent with my phone

On Fri, Dec 31, 2021, 6:50 PM John and Glennah Trochet <trochetj@...> wrote:
Dear Birders,

Thanks, Chris, for getting the word out promptly.  Looking at Google Earth, these seem like the coordinates for the Neotropic cormorant to me: 38.108287°, -121.614077°

That this bird returned to the same spot after flying off is encouraging, I think, for folks who might wish to chase it.

If you're down that way, I encourage you to look also for a sapsucker that got away too quickly to be identified, at least by me.  But it's not a red-breasted sapsucker.  My impression was that the red throat was completely encompassed laterally and inferiorly by black.  That bird crossed the road about here: 38.102185°, -121.568513°.  It ducked into the trees west of the road.  I spent an hour hoping to run into it again, but I didn't.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento

On Fri, Dec 31, 2021 at 3:08 PM Frances Oliver <hummer52@...> wrote:
Hi all!

Pat Bachetti & I are doing the CBC area directly across from where John Trochet found the NECO.  We ended up stopping our count long enough to check out his report. We found a group of DC Cormorsnts sitting on a drege in the river S of the marina along Brannan Island Rd. With these Cormorants was a much smaller one that appeared to be the NeoTropic Cormant. Hopefully the photos will come.out. 

GPS: 38°06'30.6"N 121°36'47.0"W

Frances 
Lodi, CA 

On Dec 31, 2021, at 1:36 PM, Chris Conard <conardc@...> wrote:


Hi folks,

John Trochet called, saying he found a perched Neotropic Cormorant with a small group of Double-crested Cormorants along Brannan Island Rd in the Sacramento County portion of the Delta a little after 1pm today, 31 Dec 2021. If I understood the directions correctly, it was about here (38.108488, -121.613045), where Sevenmile Slough heads north off of the San Joaquin River. There is a large dredge nearby. Unfortunately, as I was typing this up, John called again, saying the bird had left. It may come back or continue in the area.

Take care,

Chris Conard
Sacramento



--
John Trochet
Sacramento, California
trochetj@...

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